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Lakeland 

Newspapers 

„01 094- A Schrbodor Publlcalton 



VOL 108 NO. 10 



ANTIOCH MARCH 11, 1994 



THREE SECTIONS-80 PAGES 



50 GENTS 




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Eminonsyote 

School asks voters Jielp 
'■•■' tpldeal with crowding 
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Voters to make many choices at polls 



MARY FOLEY 
Staff Reporter 

Voters in Antioch have a lot to 
think about 011 March 15. Besides 
the Ilepu'bllcan battle for County 
Board, several precinct 
committeemen spots arc up for 
grabs. And, if that's not enough 
to get you out to vote, in this 
election, voters in Antioch arc 
facing the . Chain O" Lakes 



Waterway Management Agency 
referendum, the Antioch" 
Community High School 
education fund referendum, 
along with the Emmons School 
building referendum. 

A three-way race has 
developed among incumbent 
Jim Fields, Judy Martini, arid 
Kenneth Domanchuk over the 
District 1 county board- scat. 



Grant Farrell, the Democratic 
candidate; Is running 
unopposed. 

There arc several battles in 
the precincts. In precinct 1, 
Catherine Phillips and Roy 
Sackschcwsky arc vying for the 
spot, while in precinct 4 it is 
Norma Lowe and Larry Hanson. 
Precinct 7 has Frank Bessette and 
Jim Leonhardt, precinct 8 has 



Raymond Schultz battling Philip 
Riciawski, while in precinct 9 Jo 
Ann Osmond and Patty Bletsch 
are challenging each other. . In 
precinct 10 it Is Frank Benes 
versus Leon Booth, and for 
precinct 12 it is Jim Fields and 
Wayne Forrcsta 

The Lake County Sheriff's 
race has been heating up in the 
Sec VOTERS page A10 




Jazz 
legend 

Tribute 
tpBix 

Biederbecke 
RA.GEB18 



■.-Vj.V.I'i^H?.'.':. 1 : • 



Antioch Hidi referendum fete in voters' hands 



BUSINESS 




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Bay Oaks Development 
offers open space - 
option. RAGE CI 

INDEX 

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/BusiNESs ....;:. CI 

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ALEC JUNGE 

Staff Reporter 

Antioch Community High 
School is asking for an increase 
in the education fund saying the 
funds are desperately needed . 



The plan calls for an increase 
in the education fund raising the 
rate from $1.32 to $1.67 which 
translates to about $104 for a 
$100,000 house per year. 

District 117 has committed 



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1919 Award Winner 



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to spending the funds to 
eliminate the deficit, for activity 
programs, to add new curricular 
programs, to add new technology 
and to increase the amount of 
teachers to keep pace with 
enrollment increases. 

Enrollment at the high school 
is currently at 1,755. School 
officials estimate the school will 
have 1 ,835 by next year and 2,000 
students by 1997. The numbers 
arc based on the enrollments of 
the feeder schools. 



School officials explain state 
aid has decreased from $1.9 
million in 1990 to $890,000 in 
1992-93. The cost per pupil is at 
$6,490 for 1992-93 school year, a 
$700 decrease in the 1991-92 
cost 

. School officials say 300 
students were kept from 
participating in athletic events 
because of budget cuts. There arc 
only varsity and junior varsity 
levels for children to compete. 
See REFERENDUM page A10 



Zoning hearing draws 
concerned residents 



MARY FOLEY 



Tie dying 

Ben Hatfield, a sixth grader at Woodland School, conducts 
a radial chromatography experiment With the help of 
Melissa Becker, a sophomore at Aritloch Community High 
School. The Visiting grade school students were paired with 
ACHS students' for the experiments. —Photo by Bill Dermody 
Jr. 



Staff Reporter 

It was standing room only at 
the first of several Lake County 
Zoning Board of Appeals public 
hearings scheduled for Antioch, 
Lake Villa, and Grant townships. 
The hearings are to consider 
rczoning certain parcels of land 
that may have been 
inappropriately zoned in 1988. 
_ The purpose of the hearing is 
to review zoning classifications 
of those parcels where conflict 
may exist between the existing 
land use and the zoning. When 
the hearings are completed, the 
Zoning Board of Appeals will 



make recommendations to the 
County Board. 

7 Property owners received 
certified letters, while adjoining 
property owners were sent 
postcards of notification. Notice 
was also published in the 
newspaper. Roughly 30 areas 
and 300 parcels, are being 
evaluated, 

A large contingent of people 
attended the meeting because 
they had concerns about the 
rczoning of land owned by 
Republican County Board 
candidate Kenneth Domanchuk 
and his wife, Lisa Rudak. Most of 
See ZONING page A10 



COMMUNITY LAldANd Newspapers M*nch 11, 1994 



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Officials warn o 




TINA I. SWIECH 



Staff Reporter 

Late last week, county and 
state officials put a serious warn- 
ing out about predicted flash- 
floods, but so far, conditions look 
a little brighter. 

"It looks like right now we're 
in pretty good shape/' said 
Captain Tom Gardener, Lake 
County ESDA (Emergency 
Services and Disaster Agency) 
Coordinator. 

Slow weekend thaws and the 
absence of predicted heavy rains 
were no doubt the reason. 

At a press conference at the 
Lake . County Sheriffs 
Department office In Libertyvillo 
March 4, John Mitchell, Illinois 
Emergency Services director, 
traveled from Gov. Jim Edgar's 
office In Springfield to spread the 
word about foreseen floods.. 

"The state is prepared to 
assist in any way we can," said 
Mitchell. 

Reporters and television 
crews from all over the county 



and the Chicagbland area were 
invited to get the word out 

It Is anticipated that the Chain 
0' Lakes, Round Lake, Antioch 
Township, and the community 
that surrounds Slocum Lake In 
Wauconda Township, as well as 
areas around the Fox River in 
Cuba Township will be most 
affected by the floods. 

The ESDA coordinator said 
that the Fox River/ Chain O' 
Lakes Is still 14 Inches above 
flood stage at the McHenry Locks. 

Some good news was 
announced about the Des Plalnes 
River, — as of March 4 it was 1 .5 
feet below flood stage. 

At the conference, Gardener 
explained there was nearly four- 
times the normal snowfall 
amount this year. Coupled with 
the likely rains, flash flooding is a 
very good possibility. 

Triggering the concern was 
the start of floods at the sheriffs 
Marine Base on Rte. 12 in Fox 
Lake. 

As a precaution, the building 



has been sandbagged, people 
have been evacuated and the 
contents removed. Flooding at 
the Marine Base was bad last 
year, and also In 1986, explained 
Capt Gardener. 

Last year, Meyers Bay resi- 
dents on the Chain, "were seri- 
ously affected by the floods," said 
Gardener. "Now, they're getting 
nervous as the water rises again." 

Grant Highway Department 
Director, Jack Kiesgcn, and Pete 
Jakstas, the Fox Lake ESDA coor- 
dinator arc working, diligently 
with residents in any way they 
can help, Gardener announced. 

If the predictions do come 

- true, The county, the townships 

and the municipalities must work 

together in cooperation with 

each other," Mitchell said. 

Sandbags will be available 
from the township for unincor- 
porated residents, or the villages 

However, "It all depends on 
the next three or four weeks," 
said Capt. Gardener. 




Mix and match 

Emily Flores, left, a sixth grader at Woodland School carefully pours a solution under the watch- 
ful eyes of Alyssa Bartelson, a Junior at Antioch Community High School. AHCS was hosting the 
sixth graders and pairing them with high school student teachers. —Photo by Bill Dermody Jr. 



Lakeland ^ sps ; 

n££p«, 027-080) 

Antioch News-Reporter 

Founded 188$ 

Offloa of Publlurtion: 30 South WhHnoy SI., 
Grayalalta, IL 80030. Phorw (708)223-0161. 

Pubflihtd waaWy, aaoond otoi poataoa paid at 

Qrayiltk*, IL 60030. 

Mall Subscription Hataa; 818.50 Par Yav by Mall 
paU in advarwa In Laka, Cook, Konoaha and 
MoHaniy Courttiaa; afcawnara 827,00 Par Yav 
by Mall paid in advance. 

Poatmaatan Sand addraae chanaaa to Antioch 
Nawt-Raportar. 30 South Whrtnay Straat, P.O. 
Box 268, Orayalaka, llllnola 6003ft 

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Waterway to hold public 
meeting on channel dredging 



Antixh Ntwt-Raporiir 
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MR. SCHROEOER 

FoundeM9Q4-1B66- 

WILUAM H. SCHROEDER 

,. Pubiiarw/PrwWanl 

WILLIAM M. SCHROEDER 

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BILL BAUER BOB SCHROEDER 



JO DAVE ANN U. ROBERTS 



SHARON ZA8ADL ELEAflETH EBERT 

NfeAMiirtfcMrfay, 

RHONDA VWANT 

CaVMt-CW 



TINA L. SWIECH 

Staff Reporter 

Hie Waterway Management 
Agency Is going frill-steam ahead 
with plans to present an exten- 
sive dredging project for the 
board to hear, despite the possi- 
bility it will be voted out of exis- 
tence. 

On March 17, at 7:30 p.m., at 
Grant Community High School, 
the board of the Chain O' Lakes 
Fox River Waterway Management 
Agency will hold a public meeting 
for all to attend and comment on 
channels that may be in need of 
dredging. 

A proposed 11 -page 1994- 
1995 Maintenance Plan has been 
composed, which will target the 



areas in both Lake and McHenry 
Counties. 

Antioch Township channels 
are part of the plan, as well as 
Vista channels in the northeast 
portion of Nippersink Lake; 
Algonquin Township; Cuba 
Township; Nunda Township; and 
McHenry Township. 

Portions in Grant Township 
and Lake Villa Township are also 
included in the plan. 

Karen Kabbes, executive 
director of the waterway agency 
said the agency's own resources 
will be used to do the project 

. Even If the agency is voted 
down, it can still operate until 
Dec. 31. 




Crime Stoppers crime of the week 

Crime Stoppers ana the Antioch Police Department are seeking 
information regarding a burglary investigation. On Feb. 19, between 
7:45 and 11:45 p.m., unknown offender(s) forcibly entered upon the 
property of the Antioch Tire Inc., 22161 W. Rte. 173, and removed a 
large quantity of Dunlop truck tires size 1 1R x 22.5 and numerous rims. 
Contact Crime Stoppers at 662-2222 with information. 



Pete Jonltes helps county board candidate Judy Martini put up a 
sign where the rlverboat casino would have gone. Martini was a 
staunch opponent of the proposed rlverboat.— Photo by Mary 
Foley 

Four want county seat 



MARY FOLEY 



Staff Reporter 

The signs arc all over, often, 
side- by-side. County board 
incumbent Republican, Jim 
Fields, is facing a duel challenge 
by Judy Martini and Kenneth 
Domanchuk for the Republican 
spot on next November's ballot 

Jim Fields, who has been 
given the party nod, has had a 
long history of political service In 
Antioch. 

Born in 1929 in Waukegan, 
-Fields has lived ^h^wc" Antioch 
area all his life. Fields has been 
the Antioch Township 

Supervisor for 16 years. Two 
years after taking the supervi- 
sor's position, he was elected to 
the Lake County Board and has 
been there ever since. 

Fields is past chairman of the 
County Board, and holds numer- 
ous positions on various county 
committees. He is chairman of 
both the Building and Health, 
and Public Service Committees. 
He is also a member of the Forest - 
Preserve Land Preservation and 
Acquisition Committee and the 
Enterprise Committee. 

As far as the election is con- 
cerned, Fields, despite his 
incumbency, Is not taking the 
challenges lightly. 
. "I never have gone into an 
election that I did not think 
would be difficult" said Fields. 
"This one will not be any differ- 
ent" 

Judy Martini, age 41, has lived 
in the Antioch area for the past 
17 years. She graduated from 
Richmond-Burton High School 
and studied environmental hor- 
ticulture at the College of Lake 
County. 

A licensed personal assistant 
and Realtor at RE/MAX 
Advantage in Antioch, she is also 
a member of St Peter's Church. 
Martini lives with her son, Jesse. 

Martini is a director on the 
Chain O' Lakes Fox River 
Waterway Management Agency. 
She is an appointed member of 
the Special Area Management 
Planning Commission (SAMP), 
which is a consortium of govern- 
mental units evaluating water- 
way-related problems. 

One of the key issues in 
Martini's campaign is represen- 
tation. She is particularly proud 
of her availability to her con- 
stituents. 



"My record stands for itself," 
says Martini. "I've always been 
there to help people when they 
need mc. I will treat the position 
of Lake County Board member as 
an honor. It is a privilege - a priv- 
ilege I will welcome with open 
arms and an open car." 

Kenneth Domanchuk, age 50 
and owner of Antioch Antiques, 
is a 12-year resident of Antioch. 
He attended Tulcy School in 
Chicago, and then went on to 
Wright College. In college, he 
majored In ' * Business 

Administration. While he has no 
political experience, he is a 
member of the Antioch VFW and 
a Vict Nam veteran. Domanchuk 
is also a member of St Peter's 
Church. 

"I think there arc issues that 
specifically concern the residents 
of Antioch Township," 
Domanchuk explained. "Sewers 
and water, protection of the wet- 
lands, and controlled growth arc 
very important" 

Domanchuk promises to 
work full-time at the Job of 
County board member. More 
Importantly, he has pledged to 
use whatever salary he receives 
to open and staff a local office in 
the building where his business 
is located in the old Channel 
Lake School. By having his board 
office so close to his business, he 
is confident he can provide easi- 
er access to residents and the 
County Board. He also hopes to 
hold township meetings, inviting 
neighborhoods to voice their 
County concerns. 

Whoever wins the Republican 
primary will be facing 
Democratic candidate Grant 
Farrell. Farrell has a unique 
blend of experience in both con- 
struction trades and business 
management 

Farrell is a resident of 
Antioch, where he lives with his 
wife Debra and their sons 
Andrew and Bret Farrell was 
raised in Waukegan and attend- 
ed Roosevelt University. 

Farrell is currently serving his 
third term as an elected official 
on the executive Health and 
Welfare board for the Plumbers 
Local 93. He is a member of the 
■ Experimental Aircraft 

Association and is finishing his 
second term as president of the 
Illinois Branch of the Orton 
Dyslexia Society. 




"COMMUNITY UkclANd Newspapers Makc* 11, 1*94 

School BmEfs— 



Holiday reminder 

A reminder to parents that there will be no school at 
Antioch Community High School from March 26 tlirough April 
3. That week will be the students' Spring Break. 

Kindergarten registration 

Kindergarten registration at Grass Lake School will be held 
on Tuesday, March 15, from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. To be eligi- 
ble to attend kindergarten, a child must be 5 years of age on or 
before Sept. 1, 1994. A birth certificate and proof of residency 
must be presented on the sign-up date. Forms will be issued to 
each parent for the child's physical examination and immuniza- 
tion record which must be completed before a child may enter 
school in the fall. Children must also show proof of lead screen- 
ing test. Children will be evaluated and school fees will be col- 
lected during the annual fall registration in August. 

School closing information 

Parents of students in Antioch's Community Consolidated 
School District 34 and ACHS arc reminded that school closing 
announcements due to inclement weather will be made locally 
on channels WKKS-WXLC 1220 AM, WNIZ 97 PM, and WLIP- 
WJZQ 1050 AM and 95.1 FM. 



Swing on into ACHS cafe 



MARY FOLEY 

Staff Reporter 

The Antioch Community 
High. School Fine Arts. 
Department will be adding some- 
thing new to the annual "Swing 
Street Cafe"- held at the school. 
This year there be a dance floor 
and two different sets of music to 
dance to. Performing this year 
will be the ACHS Jazz Ensembles, 
the Concert and Symphonic 
Bands, along with an array of 
soloists, theater members, and 
Madrigals Choirs. 

John Olisar will be directed 
the bands, while the choirs will be 



under the direction of Keith Cox. 

Hie south gym of the high 
school is transformed into a 
swinging cafe on March 11 and 
12. The cafe opens at 7 p.m. On 
the menu will be pizza, snacks, 
dessert, and beverages. 

The cost of Swing Street Cafe 
is $G for adults and $4 for stu- 
dents and senior citizens. The 
money generated by this fund 
raiser goes toward the instru- 
mental music programs at ACHS. 
There will be no advance sales 
and tickets will be sold at the 
door. 



Hopping good time ahead 



MARY FOLEY 



Staff Reporter 

Antioch is the place to be this 
year to celebrate Easter. The fes- 
tivities begin on Friday, March 
11, when the famous Easter 
Bunny takes time off from basket 
preparation to visit with children 
from 3 to 7 p.m. on Fridays, and 
1 1 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday and 
Sunday. 

Easter festivities arc spon- 
sored by the Antioch Chamber of 
Commerce and Industry. As a 
result of our quixotic weather, 
new Chamber member Brans Nut 
Company has graciously set aside 



space inside their store for Bunny 
visits. 

Brans Nut is located at the 
corner of Main and Lake Streets. 
While the kids arc talking to the 
Bunny and having their photo- 
graph taken, parents can do some 
of that all important Easter shop- 
ping. 

On Saturday, March 26, the 
Easter Bunny visits will be held 
from 1 to 4 p.m. to allow the 
Bunny to star in the Easter parade 
at 1 1 a m. Kids, grab your parents 
and come to Antioch for a visit 
with the Easter Bunny, and don't 
miss the parade. 



LAkElANd ClASsifieds 
(708)227-8161 



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Emmons asks voters for addition 



MARY FOLEY 



Staff Reporter 

As a result of extreme over- 
crowding, Emmons School District 
has placed a building addition ref- 
erendum for $1.4 million.. 

Emmons School currently has 
12 full-sized classrooms, one 
multi-purpose room used as. a 
lunch room, gymnasium and 
stage, and a portable classroom 
unit and is simply bursting at the 
scams. Teachers have offices in 
closets, band is taught prccari-. 
ously on the stage, a combination 
third and fourth grade was creat- 
ed to handle additional students, 
and the coatrooms have been 
moved out into the hall to allow 
for more classroom space. 

The district has experienced a 
large increase in its enrollment 
this year. According to 
Superintendent Matt Tabar, the 
increases are a result of home- 
owner turn-over of existing 
homes and new homeowners in 
the Heron Harbor and Fairway 
Estate's subdivisions. 

Emmons instituted numerous 
changes before going to the tax- 
payers. Community Committees 
have spent the past several years 
looking for solutions to the 
Emmons overcrowding situation. 
In 1990 the school undertook a 
life safety project that added two 
additional classrooms. 

Administrators increased the 
class size as well as added the 



relocatable classroom. Presently, 
the portable classrooms hold the 
school's library as well as some 
special education classes. 
Essentially, Emmons has run out 
of space. 

Officials even considered 
using the gymnasium for class- 
rooms. The school would then 
build a pole barn to house the 
gym. However, that plan was not 
really practical-. 

"It was not a viable idea," said 
Tabar. "It turned out not to be 
much cheaper than our building 
plan." 

After trying almost every fea- 
sible' alternative to combat the 
space problem the school board 
has authorized a 19 cent building 
referendum for the March ballot. 

"Tliis will be basic space for 
students," explained Tabar. "We 
had an architect look at design 
possibilities and we came to the 
point we arc now. We waited as 
long as we possibly could. Wc 
have exhausted all the possibili- 
ties. That is why wc arc on the 
ballot this March." 

The estimated cost for the 
project is $1.5 million, however 
voters will be asked to approve 
$1.4 million to be financed over a 
fifteen year period. , Impact fees 
of $110,000 collected over the 
past four years will be used to off- 
set the costs. 

■ The Emmons School building 
addition would include 14 class- 



rooms to meet the needs of 
increased enrollment. The pro- 
ject would Include two sets of stu- 
dent washrooms, an elevator 
(required under ADA laws), a 
sprinkler system, a new septic 
field, lot improvement, and 
equipment to furnish classrooms 
such as desks, chalkboards, bul- 
letin boards, book shelves, and 
closets. 

With a successful referendum 
in March of 1994, students will be 
able to occupy the addition in the 
fall of 1995. The foundation 
would be installed in the summer 
of 1994 and the project would be 
under roof in the fall of 1994. 

Tabar Is confident that if the 
referendum passes, the school 
will not be asking voters for more 
money next year. "We have 
enough to support the education 
fund," said Tabar. "Wc will not 
need additional money for the 
education fund in the foreseeable 
future. We have healthy growth." 

Emmons School seems to 
have a combination of involved 
parents and academic achievers. 
Parents several months ago gath- 
ered together to rebuild the play- 
ground at the school. The school 
also received excellent marks 
from the state when ranked in the 
state school report cards. 
Emmons eighth-graders scores 
were up in all categories from last 
year as well as above the state 
averages. 



Parent's group gets donation 



MARY FOLEY 

Staff Reporter 

The ALL (Antioch, Lake Villa, 
Lindcnhurst) Parent Network ' 
received a donation of $1,000 
from the Village of Antioch for the 
annual post prom party. ALL has 
been sponsoring the party for the 
past three years, and also is 
responsible for the parent direc- 
tory. 

This year's post prom party 
will be at Second City theater in 
Chicago. Participants will be 
bused from the prom in Palatine, 
to Chicago, returning to Chicago 
around 5 a.m. It is hoped that an 
additional bus will be available 
from Antioch to Chicago for 
those students who wish to par- 
ticipate in the post prom activi- 



ties but not attend the prom. 

"A lot of students take a limo 
to the prom," said Ellen Ipscn, of 
ALL. "This will save them a lot 'of 
money. It will only be a one-way 
trip." 

This will be the fourth year 
ALL Parent Network has spon- 
sored the post prom party. The 
group began when some parents 
learned exactly where their stu- 
dents spent their hours after 
prom. 

"When my daughter was a 
freshman, students used to rent 
hotel rooms to stay out all night," 
said Ipscn. "Parents allowed this 
because they Figured it was safer 
than having them drink and 
drive. 

The group is primarily funded 



by donations from villages and 
large organizations; Lake Villa 
gave the group $500, Lindcnhurst 
is paying for one bus, the Antioch 
Rotary has given $500, the 
Antioch lions Club gave $500, as 
well as a donation from the 
Lindcnhurst Men's Club. 

The cost to students is very 
reasonable. For $15 a person, 
students will receive transporta- 
tion to and from Second City, 
food, non-alcoholic ' beverages, 
and a two hour performance by 
Second City. It is a great way to 
spend prom night safely. 

"We encourage the kids to 
come," said Ipsen. ALL besides 
looking for donations is also 
looking for adult chaperones. 



You 

Is My 



r ouccess 




usiness 



After 1 8 years of advertising sales experience here in Lake County 
I am proud and excited to nave joined the dynamic sales staff at ■ 
Lakeland Newspapers. 

Joanne Norton 

Antioch News- Reporter 
Lake Villa Record 
Lindenhurst News 

Lake County Community News 
Since 1886 



30 S. Whitney St. 

P.O. Box 268 

Grayslake, IL 60030 



Contact 



Joanne Norton 
(708)223-8161 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



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PolicE Beat 



Persons charged with a crime are Innocent until proven - 
guilty in a court of law. 

ANTIOCH 

Woman stopped for speeding 

Marie Kamin, age 40, of Trevor was stopped byAntioch 
police on March 5 when she was observed traveling at a high 
ratcof speed southbound on Trevor Road. Police then discov- 
ered Kamin was driving on a suspended license. She was ticket- 
ed for both offenses and released on bond. 

> - ' • 

Purse stolen at store 

A temporary demonstrator had her purse stolen while work- : 
ing'a't the Piggly Wiggly on March 5. Inside the purse was $47 in 
cash and a bank card. Police are investigating. 

Men arrested for DUI 

In two separate incidents James King, age 48, Waukcgan and 
Edward Dawson, age 27, of Antioch, were arrested for driving 
under the influence of alcohol on March 5. Both were 
processed and released on bond. 

Thomas Martin, age 29, of Fox Lake was arrested for driving 
under the influence of alcohol on March 4. He was initially 
stopped when he was observed traveling 52 mph in a 40 mph 
zone on Route 83. He was released on. bond. 

Gar damaged in vandalism 

On March 7, a woman discovered that person(s) unknown 
wrote obscenities in nail polish on the trunk lid of her car. The 
car was parked in the driveway at the time of the damage. 

Women arrested in restaurant 

Christine McArthur, age 36, of Spring Grove, and Dclorcs De 
George, age 55, of Antioch were arrested for using profanity 
while in the Vault Restaurant on March 6. Both were released' 
on bond. 

Man arrested for trespass 

Charles Clayton, age 34, of Antioch, was arrested after a 
domestic dispute. During an earlier argument , Clayton was 
removed from an apartment and given a ride by police to 
Antioch Township. Clayton then returned to the apartment 
where he was arrested for criminal trespass. 

Indiana man picked up 

Mark Quinn, age 31, of Schcrcrvillc, Indiana was arrested 
', :March 6 on an active parole violation from Waukesha, 
Wisconsin for intimidation of a witness. Quinn was stopped 
initially for an inoperable taillight. He also received a ticket for 
not having his drivers license on his person. After processing 
Quinn for his traffic violations, he was taken to Lake County jail 
to await extradition. 

LAKE VILLA 

Resisting the police 

Police reported Kevin Yost, 17, 2247 Grass Lake Road, 
Lindenhurst, and Jeffrey C. Little, 19, 234 Hickory, Antioch, on 
March 6, were arrested in connection with attempted break-ins 
of vehicles at the Deep Lake Hermitage Apartments. Apparently 
a resident called to report several youths were in the parking lot 
breaking into vehicles. When an officer and two Lindenhurst 
officers assisted they found young males scattered and Yost and 
Little. As police were questioning Yost he committed a battery 
and resisted arrest. Yost was detained and arrested. Little was 
arrested for criminal trespass. Four other males were ques- 
tioned but weren't charged. 

Caught for many offenses 

Police reported Jack Modjeski, 67, 43172 Route 83, Antioch, 
on March 2, was arrested for a variety of offenses including dri- 
ving with a revoked license, a warrant arrest, suspended regis- 
tration and no insurance and speeding, lie was stopped after 
driving 46 mph in a 35 mph zone. He was released on a $10,000 
recognizance bond and is scheduled to appear in court at 
Grayslakc on April 13. 

LINDENHURST 

Dart game has violent end 

Police reported Linda Hauck, 44, Zion, on March 2, was 
arrested for battery for an incident which occurred at RJ's 
Eatery. Apparently Hauck got into an argument with a woman 
after a dart game and pushed her down stairs, pulled her hair 
and punched her in the face. Police made contact with Hauck 
and arrested her for battery. She was released on an individual 
bond and is scheduled to appear in court on April 6 at 
Grayslakc. 

Caught drinking and driving 

Police reported David Smith, 22, 1580 Partridge, 
Lindenhurst, on March 3, was arrested for driving under the 
Influence of alcohol, driving In the wrong lane and improper 
lane usage. The officer saw Smith's vehicle drive over the medi- 
an at the intersection of Deep Lake and Third Avenue and also 
move over and drive near the gravel shoulder and was stopped. 
Smith had a blood alcohol reading of .16. He was released on a 
$3,000 bond and is scheduled to appear in court on April 12 at 
Waukegan. 



Martini offers reward for signs 



Judy Martini, Republican can- 
didate for Lake County Board is 
planning to file 1 a police report 
regarding the theft of her cam- 
paign signs. She is also posting a 
reward of $1,000 for information 
that results in a conviction of the 



sign remover. 

"I have tallied it up," said 
Martini. "They have taken over 
$2,200 worth of signs. Of the 
large signs, the only ones that arc 
left are on Main Street (Antioch)." 

Martini estimates that 50 out 



of 67 signs put up last weekend 
have been removed. According 
to Martini, smaller yard sighs 
have been taken also. 

Anyone with information 
should call 395-3000. 



Residents dismayed, developer gets extensio 



MARY FOLEY 
Staff Reporter ■ 

A large number of Antioch 
Village residents turned out for 
Monday's board meeting, only to 
learn that the village decided to 
return the Windmill Creek issue 
back to the Combined Planning 
and Zoning Board. Residents 
were, however, reassured that it 
was the zoning board's intention 
to provide an opportunity to 
express their concerns. 

"I think it is clear from the rec- 
ommendation of the Planing 
Commission to provide informa- 
tion at a public hearing,'! Trustee 
Marv Oldenburgcr told the audi- 
ence. At the Feb. 24 meeting of 
the Antioch Planning and Zoning 
Board, America Today 



Developers asked the board for 
approval to increase the number 
of proposed homes from 307 to 
381. The board unanimously 
rejected the plan. 

Already, 38 homes have been 
built on the development, and 
owner, Al Little, is planning to sell 
the western part of the develop- 
ment to America Today. Little 
wants to keep the remaining por- 
tion while developing it himself. 

The developers met with 
strong opposition from residents 
at the Planning and Zoning meet- 
ing. The focus of their concerns 
seemed to be the proposed densi- 
ty of the new plan. Resident's at 
the meeting also expressed con- 
cerns about stormwatcr run-off. 
Residents were told that notice 



will be posted regarding the date 
of the next Planning and Zoning 
meeting. It is expected to take 
place in April. 

The Antioch Village Board, 
several months ago, approved an 
extension of 90 more days to the 
Windmill Creek Development. 
The development has yet to com- 
plete certain public and quasi - 
public improvements. 

This will be the second exten- 
sion that the developer has 
received. In December, the 
developer asked for an extension 
of one year. However, the board 
denied that request. 

The new extension; which will 
run until April 18, serves to fore- 
stall the board from drawing on 
the letter of credit. 





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COMMUNITY UIceIanH Newspapers MAftck 11, 1994 



Upper Grade lists honors 



The following students 

where named to the honor roll 
at Antioch Upper Grade 
School. 
Straight A 
Sixth grade 

Albert Eng, Elizabeth Ivantlc, 
Jennifer Keener, Jessica Mcnzer, 
Laura Plcse, Kathorino Suhar, 
Courtney Tripp. 
Seventh grade 

Bradley Amundsen; Thomas 
Baird, Scott Dalian, Amber Dusaic, 
J.J, Jarrctt Edwards, Fred Fcttingcr, 
Steve Latino, Jessica Madsen, 
Rebecca McNeill, Anthony 
Montclconc, Edward Plcse, Erin 
Rlopc, Kalhryn Rogers, Icssica 
Sladok, Erin Walsh. 
High Honor Roll 
Sixth grade 

Lauren Bcatty, Erin Belneckc, 
Danielle Buchanan, Lindsay 
Burke, Brittany Cable, Jacob Cox, 
Carrie Cybul, Kathleen Dalton, 
Kevin Edgcomb, Timothy 
Fleming, Brandon Gaylor, Clare , 
Gaynor, Jeffrey Gtcrnoth, Kllnt 
Green. 

Jlllian Gunderson, Ambert 
Gustafson, Aaron lames, Kari 
Kocpkc, Timothy Lind, Krtsty 
Meyer, Nicholas Moore, Adam 
NIlcs, Nlkkl Padcn, Ryan Perks, 
Nicholas 1'lacko, Stephanie 
Povilaitis, Justin Reuter, Jennifer 
Rosen, Margaret Ross, Eileen 
Stack. 
Seventh grade 

Katie Anderson, Emily Yrc, 
Patricia Beemer, Rchccca Boll, 
John Bcstlcr, Erin Boodcy, Gavin 
Burke, Kenneth Clchon, Trevor 
Crlvcllo, Dcna Cucnco, Shaun 
Dcxhelmcr, Kevin Fielder, Llndy 
Gaylor. 

Eric Green, Jennifer Groth, 
Brian Galcy, Laura Harmon, Krista 
Hlntz, Kristcn Hungarian, Christin 
Huspen, Jamie Jnrgenscn, 
Maureen Moran, Daniel 
Paslcwlcz, Jodl Schultz, Rebecca 
Sosnowskt, Christine Vos. 
Regular Honor Roll 
Sixth grade 

Keith Beyer, Rayn Bivins, 
Tryston Bonhivert, Jennifer 
Decker, Elizabeth Elsen, Margaret 
Fischer, Qulnn Gooch, Heather 
Hajduk, William Hazel, Sarah 
Johnson, WoJtck Krupka, Andrew 
Lyon, James Meyer, John Morley, 
Chclscy Mortenson, Nealcy 
O'Brien, Amanda Thomas, 
Patricia Wehszcll, Heather Zcman. 
Seventh grade 

Monica Baschc, Sarah 
Bcltasso, Mure Colatrlno, Laura 
Eaton, Stephanie Forcsta, Megan 
Gaca, Heidi Haug, Colin Haley, 
Kelly Haley, Sara Hllgcr, Tiffany 
Kapsalis, Matthew Kllnglcr, Derek 
Otcson, Edward Rotchford, Steven 
Strelow, Jamie Wismer. 
Honorable Mention 
Sixth grade 

Dawn Blackwood, 

Christopher Bock, Dustyn Bono, 
Mark Brose, Laura Ccdcrquist, 
Amanda Ciszcwskl, Ryan Comer, 
Ryan Fiedler, Danielle Fordham, 



Christopher Fries, Kristcn Gamlln, 
David Harney, Elisabeth Huhcr, 
Jessica Jacobs, Ryan Kccfe, Jamie 
Laudcnslagcr, Christopher 

Lazzara, Bryan Lear, Aill Llsh, 
Clinton Ludden, Robyn 
Mortens en, Elizabeth Moss, 
Rachel Ruth, Rachel Ryzncr, Tlana 
Song, Kyle Tlkovilsch, Kris 
Vandcrkooy, Theodore Wclrich, 
Cartn Wcnnslrom. 
Seventh grade 

April Abbott, Alex Bergcr, 
Rebecca Blrrcn, Brian Borchers, 
Stephanie Burleson, Paul 
Cavanaugh, Denis Colby, Kevin 
Collins, Rhonda Dcckert, Meghan 
Dyer, Sara Fletcher, Jessica 
Frazicr, Christine Frcl, Weston 
Frcy, Samantha Griffin, Luke 
Haley, Laura Harvey, Scan 
Honlckc). 

Thomas Jehllcka, Cynthia 
Klrchner, Jeff Klein, Cheryl Knlggc, 
Drew Lang, Jason Langlcy, Katie 
Laptante, Sarah Lachlnskl, 
Michael MacMlllan, Bradley 
Marchlldon, Rebecca Miranda, 
Glna Parrilii, Tlmohty Phelps, 
Jeffrey Rajamakl, Natalie Rlchter, 
Nicole Ring, Kevin Ruuhcla, 
Esther Schourer, Julie Sylsma, 
Jeremiah Uhl, Teresa Walsh, 
Adam Zakroczymskl. 
Eighth grade 

Abigail Alder, Christopher 
Bock, Brianna Brandt, Alicia 
Cannon, Shannon Carlln, Lcsll 
Chcterbok, Corey Fauser, Suzanne 
Juzwlk, Julia Kick, Raymond 
Laffcrty, Nicole Langlcy, Brian 
Lazansky, Eric Ludden, Kim 
Malkamakl, Jonathan Mitchell, 
Aaron Mortenson, Kalpcsh Patcl, 
Ronak Patcl, Jeremy Pluclcnnlk, 
Christopher Porter, Monica 
Rlnchiuso, Michael Slcdler, Daniel 
Slack, Miranda Stanley, Jeffrey 
Ultcs, Audra Waylandcr, Molly 
Welch, BUI Worchck. 
Moat Improved 
Sixth grade 

Dcslrce Gcng. 
Seventh arade 

Gregory Dickson, Sean 
Honlckc]. 
Eight grade 

Jeffrey Ultes. 

Moving Up Students 
Sixth grade 

•Dawn Blackwood, Josephine 
Gaffrlg, April Klepackf, Antonla 
Liarakos, Christine Martin, Kevin 
McCauslln, Lucas Ncuhaus, Kelt 
Owens, Rachel Ryzner, Brian 
Weston, Nicole Wltlkamp. 
Seventh grade 

Marc Colatrlno, Christopher 
DcBoard, Dan Kaiser, Cheryl 
Knlggc, Jason Langlcy, Eugene 
Lindom, Anthony Monteiconc, 
Rebecca Payton, Jeremiah Powell. 

Eighth grade 

Catherine Becker, Jessica 
Burdick, Christopher Defer, 
Crystal Gcng. Robert Glenn, Justin 
Gudgeon, Mclanle Harvey, Jim 
Macluk, Rhett Mitchell, Jeffrey 
Ncubiscr, Shawn Shcchan, 
Jennifer Tlkovilsch, Victoria 
Zupan. 



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Monday thru Friday 
8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 
Sat. 8 a.m. -12 p.m. 



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Fax (708) 395-4232 



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Todd outdid herself with dance 



Special evening 

Three years ago, Carol Todd, 
of the Antioch Parks and 
Recreation Department, estab- 
lished the first "Daddy/Daughter 
Date Night" In Antioch. It was a 
huge success and now this mem- 
orable event Is still going stronger 
than ever. 

This year's gala event was held 
on Saturday. February 19, In the 
gym and cafeteria of Antioch 
Upper Grade School. The little 
ones came all decked out In 
beautiful dresses woaring cor- 
sages and all. The dads came 
wearing their Sunday's finest 
Punch and cookies were served in 
the cafeteria and the girls kept 
dear old dad dancing ail evening 
to the special music of the DJ; 
Simon Says, Hokey Pokey and.the 
Chicken Song were danced many 
times over as well as other beau- 
tiful slow and fast dance 
melodies. 

A photographer (guess who) 
was on duty taking Polaroid pic- 
tures of each special couple as a 
treasured keepsake of this mem- 
orable evening. A "little birdie" 
told me that Carol Todd really 
outdid herself this year In making 
this annual event bigger and bet- 
ter than ever. The many partici- 
pants thank Carol for her fine 
efforts In creating special memo- 
ries to remember for a life time. 
Thanks, Carol, for adding to the 
spccialness of our "Hometown." 

More from Gay 

Last week 1 shared a poem by 
Guy Vlgnola In honor of his birth- 
day. As promised here are a cou- 
ple more selections from this fine 
gentleman. "We must live in the 
present, think of the future, but ' 
never forget the past for it is the 
past we draw upon to help shape 
our future." (untitled) 

Guy wrote "Why Can't 1 Be 
Understood" in 1980— "As I sit 
alone with tears in my eyes, 



thinking of days long gone, I feel I 
have not done enough. I believe I 
should have done more, I give all 
my love and energy to those I 
love, and I expect nothing In 
return. Why do I feel guilty of not 
giving enough when in fact It is I 
who has not reaped what I have 
given. I have an affection so deep 



HOMETOWN GOODIES 



UZ 

SCHMEHL 




J95-5J80 



that only God can understand 
what I am about, what I think, 
and what 1 feel. Why can't my 
love for others be realized? I need 
to believe my love will reflect 
back to those I love, whether I am 
understood or not" 

Guy, I am sure my readers 
have enjoyed your creativity as 
much as I did. Once again, Joan, 
thanks for sharing a little piece of 
your loving father with us all. 

Thank yon 

A special thank you Is in order 
to Zachary Schmidt's mom for 
helping with the Valentine Party 
at Camp Crayon and providing 
the children with a special cookie 
decoration experience. Zachary 
also brought a very special "Show. 
N/TelT item to Camp; his two 
year old sister, Amber. When the 
children asked "Where did you 
get her?" Zachary proudly replied 
"From my Mom!" He then walked 
Amber around the circle and 
repeated to each child "This is my 
sister." Great job, Zachary, and 
thanks again, mom, for the help 
and cookie decorating experi- 
ence. It was fun for everyone. 

Time to vote 

On March 5, Antioch 
Community High School will be 




State Bank ofthel^cs, formerly State Bank of Antioch, will 
award its fifth annual College of Lake County two-year scholarship 
}to an Antioch Community High School graduate planning to ; 
attend the college. ' ■"'-' - " * : V;?; 1 ; ; '"; . '* 

Trie scholarship, open to ACHS seniors for the academic year 
l994-95;^lncludes fuU tultlonand books: ^V ' ^^ 

Roger V.Manderscheld, executive vice president an<l ACHS 
bank liaison, cites criteria for awarding the scholarship Includes 
scholastic achievement, school activities, community service and 
financial need. 

Students and parents interested In more information may 
contact an ACIIS guidancecounselor. 

Manderschcid urges undergraduate students to begin early 
preparation for the State Bank scholarship award. 



asking voters to support a 35 cent 
increase In the Education Fund. 
The school board has identified 
six areas in which the increased 
revenue will be utilized; 
Eliminate Deficit, Technology, 
Activity Program, Curricular 
Programs, Increased Enrollment 
and Class Size. If you would like 
more information regarding this 
Education Fund referendum, you 
can write to the Citizens for 
ACHS, P.O. Box 409, Antioch, M, 
and ask that someone please call 
you to discuss the Issues or that 
more information be mailed to - 
you. 

Fox Lake school! 

Many students at Lotus/Forest 
Schools achieved the honor roll 
recognition for the second quar- 
ter marking period. 
Congratulations to all on a job 
well done. Special mention is 
extended to the following .stu- 
dents who accomplished straight 
"A" academic honors: 

Lauren Miller, Morgan Morris, 
Jennifer Collet t, Ashley Eberle, 
Kercsse Kammingo, Brittany 
Payton, Joseph Rosene; Sara 
Wltte, Tasha Corcoran, William 
Dowd, Sara Harwood, Mara Kate 
Kellcher, Keith Schoiberg, Louis 
Reynoso, Stephanie Mlnkalls, 
Amanda Peckowskl, Sharl 
Helmlnski, Matthew Janoqlcz, 
Erica Yeater, Nell Drews, Jillian 
Hurhn, Victoria Mlslcka, Annie 
Torgerson, Brian Wilson, Denise 
Arteaga, Nicholas Fain, Chantell 
Gebert, Shawna Hlleman and 
Megan Stanls. 

GrmM Lake school 

The following Grass Lake 
School Junior high students! 
achieved the high honor .roll 
recognition for the second quar- 
ter grading period: Abbey Clark, 
Amber Gore, Kristin MiodonsU, 
Eric Ritter, Josh White, Jessica 
Cardls, Sarah Ritter, Rick Lara, 
Denise Lorenz and Sarah Groh. 

Congratulations to the follow- 
ing students accomplishing the 
honor roll for the same grading 
period: Jenny Cardls, Tia Chlnn, 
Taml Edclman, Candlce 
Kasprzak, Jenny Konstans, 
Brigette Leonard, Steve Spencer, 
Ken Adelizzi, Brandy Brown, 
Christine Charvat, John Gollbn, 
Sarah Gray, Nicole Schaller, 
Christian Vogcl, ■ Sarah 
Wcchselbcrgcr, Kristi Beemer, Jill 
Cardls, Carrie Dunfrund, Angle 
Fragassi, Lisa Gillies, Amber 
Jerome, Jeff Johannsen, Jason 
Loncrgan and Megan McHale. 



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NOTICE 

During the past cold snap, less than 1% of our customers had 
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Much 17, 1994 UkElANd Newspapers COMMUNITY 



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-Shop ANTiock— — .... ^ "*;■ 
Welcome and farewell to businesses 



Dofottw© Hlmtw, VFW coordinator, Is getting ready fo the 
Auxiliary's Swing Into spring craft show. 

'Swing into Spring' with 
Antioch VFW Auxiliary 



MARY FOLEY 

Staff Reporter 

It is that time again. The 
Women of the VFW Auxiliary are 
sponsoring their yearly craft 
show at the Antioch VFW Post on 
North Avenue in Antioch. 

This year's offerings include 
over 70 exhibitors, refreshments, 
and door prizes. 

.."After all our snow and zero 
weather, we arc ready to look for 
items for St. Patrick's Day, Easter, 
Mother's Day, and Father's Day, 



said Dorothee, the coordinator of 
the show. "We have over 70 
crafters, two halls full of goodies, 
food on the premises, door 
prizes, and lots of fun. 

"We hope that all' of our 
friends of Antioch and surround- 
ing areas come out to see us," she 
continued. 

The craft show will be held oh 
March 19 from 9 a.m. to .4 p.m. 
and on March 20 from 11 am. to 
4 p.m. For more information call 
Dorothee at 395-6934. 



As a long time resident and 
member of the business commu- 
nity of Antioch, I've seen a lot of 
businesses come and go over the 
yoars. My parents ran the General 
Store which operated over a span 
of 20 years. I remember Antioch 
having shoe stores, a pool hall, 
motorcycle shops, an art supply 
shop, record stores, sewing 
stores, drugstores, a steak joint, 
department stores, various cloth- 
ing stores for men, women and 
children, appliance stores and a 
catalog shop. 

Each merchant opened their 
shop with a high level of opti- 
mism, idealism, creativity and 
willingness to work hard and take 
financial risks just as the mer- 
chants who make up the Antioch 
business community. 

Shopping in your home town 
is a very Important element in 



having a thriving community. 
Next time you're going shopping, 
stop and think, is there anywhere 
In Antioch that I can find this? 

The bright side of this is the 
continuing degree of commit- 
ment and motivation our mer- 
chants have and the knowledge 
that Antioch is still growing and 
thriving. The merchants appreci- 
ate the ongoing support given to 
them by the people in our com- 
munity. 

We welcome Creative Glass 
Designs, located on Route A3 
near Ted's State Line. The Exner 
Family is celebrating their grand 
opening this week and welcomes 
you to drop in. In their workshop, 
you can sec them etching the 
glass to fill special orders. If time 
allows, personalizing may be 
done while you wait. If you need a 
special and personal wedding or 



anniversary gift, consider a crys- 
tal vase with their wedding Invita- 
tion etched into it. Truly a gift to 
treasure. Also featured arc 
awards and incentives, personal- 
ized with company logos. 

On a sad note, we're sorry to 
say goodbye to Peddler's Beach. 
They offered an interesting selec- 
tion of crafts, candles and deco- 
rative items along with a tanning 
salon. 

Due to personal reasons. 
Sheila's last day will be March 26. 
She has big savings on everything 
storcwidc as a final farewell. We 
hate to see her leave, but we wish 
her well in her new endeavors. 

Editor's note: Shop Antioch is 
a weekly newsletter showcasing 
Anttoch's merchants and retailers. 
Prepared and written by Barbara 
Porch of Choosey Child. 



Senior Center offers activities, services 



-ParI< HAppENiiNqs— 

Park gets ready for Easter parade 



Batter parade 

d If you would like to enter a 
float in the parade call the parks 
and recreation office for a parade 
form. There is no fee to enter the 
parade. The parade is Saturday, 
March 26 at 11 a.m. down Main 
Street to Williams Park. 

Easter adventure 

The Second Annual 
Eggcellent Easter Adventure is an 
egg hunt for ages 2 to 9 and will 
be Saturday, March 26 at approx- 
imately noon on the open fields 
behind the Antioch Lower Grade 
School. After the Easter Parade, 
hop down to the Antioch Lower 
Grade School to join the Easter 
Bunny. Cost Is $2 per child. 

Sign language 

The park district is offering a 
class in sign language Thursday, 
March 10 from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. 
at the Antioch Lower Grade 
School Cafeteria. The registra- 
tion fee is $65 for village resi- 
dents, $70 for township residents 
and $75 for anyone living outside 
Antioch. Class is open to anyone 
•12 or older. 

Lakes area band 

Membership is open to adults 



or high school students.. Band 
membership is volunteer, with no 
audition required. To register for 
the Community Band call 395- 
5566 or 395-1421. 



The Antioch Senior Center Is a 
multi-purpose drop in center 
open Monday through Friday 
from 6:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Anyone 
age 60 and over is welcome to 
attend. The center is adminis- 
tered by Catholic Charities with 
the support of the United Way, 
Federal Funding, the fundralslng 
efforts of Its members and the 
Village of Antioch, who owns and 
maintains the building. 

Nutrition Services 

A nutritious, balanced hot- 
lunch is 'served at the 'center 
Monday through Friday at 11:45 
am. Seniors are asked to sign up 
at least two days in advance. The 
cost of the meal is $1 .50.' The 
nutrition program is run primari- 
ly by senior volunteers who work 
' In the kitchen, serve meals, help 



with registration and clean-up. 
The menu is published in local 
newspapers, the membership's 
monthly newspaper, and posted 
at the center. 

In addition to the noon con- 
gregation meals program, a home 
delivered meal program operates 
out of the Antioch Senior Center. 
Eligible recipients living in 
Antioch receive a nutritious, bal- 
anced, and hot meal. The meals 
arc delivered by volunteers at 
noon five days a week. For more 
information regarding. the Home 
Delivered Meals program, call 
546-5733. 

Membership 

Membership to the center is 
$5 a year. As a member, a senior 
will receive our monthly calendar 
and newsletter and the benefit of 



reduced rates on parties and 
other activities. Although mem- 
bership support is encouraged, it 
is not mandatory and all seniors 
arc welcome to participate in any 
center activity. ■ 

Activities 

Activities at the Center 
include: Bingo, every Monday at 
12:45 pm; Sing-A-Long, every 
Wednesday at 10:30 am; Birthday 
Parties the last Friday of every 
month (live band present); Cards, 
every week, Including' PokeT,, 
Bridge and Pinochle tourna- 
ments; Blood Pressure Testing 
the last Monday of every month, 
with free testing from 9 to 1 1a.m. 

The Center also provides 
classes for the following activi- 
ties: Bridge, Line Dancing, 
Pinochle, Exercise and Crafts. 



■f. 



March 
1994 



$1 





*■« *' ' : ' 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



Friday 



n 



7:30 p.m. Antioch 

Community High 
School Fundraiser 
for Instrumental 
Music Programs. 
Call 395-7826. 

7:30 pm "Swing Street 
Cafe' Variety 
Show at Antioch 
High School. 
Tickets at Door 



For insurance 
call 

Dick Witt 
395-1089 



Mc ha Immce fo«pula 
Heat OfflM Hooatyoa, IDIhI* 




Tuesday 



15 



Saturday 



12 



6:30 p.m. Oakwood Knolls 
Property Owners 
Assc. Annual 
Spring Dance 
at Antioch VFW 
Hall. Ticket Info: 
395-5994/ 
395-2676 

7:30 p.m* "Swing Street 
Cafe" Variety 
Show at Antioch 
High School. 
Tickets at Door 



Wednesday 



16 



9-1 1 a.m. Lake County 
Health Dept. 
Immunization 
Program, at VFW 
Hall. 395-5393 

7 p.m. Park Commission 
Meeting, village 
Hall 



Sunday 



13 



Thursday 



17 



7:30 p.m. Antioch 

Community High 
School Board 
Meeting. Board 
Room 



Monday 



14 



Coming Up: 

March 19 VFW Ladles 
9 a.m.- Auxiliary Craft 
4 p.m. Fair, at VFW 

March 20 Shut-In Mass for 
1 1 a.m. the Hadlcapped, 
St. Peter's Social 
.Center 



m 



GOT SOMETHING GOIN6JOM»e^WMSIlNM^lRgamue223-8161. 



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1 COMMUNITY UkeUNd NtwspApERs Makch 1 1, 1994 



Antioch High School names first semester honor students 



The following students have 
been named to the honor roll for 
the first semester of the 1993-94 
school year at Antioch 
Community High School. 
High honor roll 
Seniors 

Karen Anderson, Alexandra 
Arnold, Sarah Ayrc, Cassandra Bailey, 
Amanda Baright, Michael Beadle, 
Ryan Bcall, Leslie Bcckcy, Erica 
Bchllng, Aaron Bell, Cheryl Bell, 
Charles Bradley, Kelly Burleson, 
Klmbcrly Cashmore, Candy Chingo, 
Rebecca Chris tophcrscn, Krlsta 
Damron, Stephen Denic, Beth 
Dcsblens, Amy Dogan, Matthew 
Dohrmann, Adam Donald, Nina 
Durnial, Dcidrc Erlenborn, Jeremy 
Garbacz, Anthony Gardin, Carrie 
GillHand, Amy Glenn, Stephen 
Glover, Timothy Grabowski, Nicole 
Gradowski, Erin Grana, James Gray, 
Uura Harris. Dlna Hart, 

Morgan Hirst, Glna Hncrlc, Brian 
Hribar, Donna Jcdclc, David Jones, 
Eric Jones, Tiffany Karg, Clarissa 
Kaspr/ak, Melissa Kcndrick, Patricia 
Kcndziora, Jcrg Kinbcrgcr, Franklin 
Kirschcnhcitcr, Jenny Kocal, Shelley 
Kitdingo, Kathryn LaPlantc, Sara 
Lcighliicr, Jennifer Lolmaugh, 
Marianne Maliszcwski, Erin Maloncy, 
Amy Mandcrschcid, Thomas Mason, 
Rebecca Masucci, Sarah McKoski, 
Lisa Melting, Melissa Mcrkh, Adam 
Miller, Chris Modra, Heather 
Monningcr, Cliff Moore, Jennifer 
Mosicr,' Timothy Noonan, Casey 
O'Connell, William O'Donnelt. 

Megan O'Grady, Josatyn 
O'Higgins, Maxlnc Olson, Maureen 
Pankauskas, Kirstcn Peterson, Chris 
Pclykowski, Lisa Powers, Crystal 



Plasicnski, Srlvatsan Raghavan, Amy 
Rcljoncn, Amber Robbins, Karen 
Rogers, Carrie Rowland, Justin 
Runyard, Marcy Schcurcr, David 
Sch ran, Courtney Shaughncssy, 
Jonathan Sladck, Michelle Smith, 
Virginia Smith, Elizabeth Sobczak, 
Justin Sosnowskl, Christopher 
Sproull, Kcry Strysick, Jcanctte Studt, 
Brett Swanson, Kritscn Swanson, 
Richard Thomas, Thomas Tomascllo, 
Kim Totter, Janet Wais, Kathleen 
Warner, Lorlne Watkins, Klmbcrly 
Wlrstng, Chris Zaccagnlni, Jennifer 
Zimmcr. 
Juniors 

Misty Adkins, Dusko Bahin, Joann 
Bachara, Gretchcn Bafrd, Nicholas 
Ballingcr, Alyssa Bartclson, Scott 
Barton, Douglas Bober, Amber 
Boodcy, Daniel Carlson, Colleen 
Chclsa, Corey Cleghorn, Melissa 
Dean, James Doollttlc, Susan Doly, 
Timothy Doyle, Eric Eckcnstahler, 
Kevin Erlckson, Malt Fasana, Kelly 
Fassbindcr, Pence Fcrrara, Katie 
Fctting, Joshua Fleming, Jeffrey 
Ficshman, Lorl Folbrick, Frank Friar, 
Victoria Gaffrig, Rhonda Garwood, 
Brett Giza, Sharon Gorslinc, Aicx 
Grob, Stacy Hagcn. 

Christine Hammer, Catherine 
Harney, Lindsay HIadnik, Jennifer 
Hovcy, Kristin Jensen, Suzcttc 
Johnson, Jessica Kane, Dinn Katris, 
Tricia Kcefc, Beth Kirschcnhcitcr, 
Christopher Kuccra, Andrea Kuini, 
David Lawrence, Matthew Lcisc, 
Rebecca Lid die, Jason Lcnhardt, 
Harry Love, James Love, Leah 
Luddcn, Kevin Lucck, Kathcrinc 
Lutgcn, Brain Maickc, Gina 
Maravclas, Brill McCallum, Shcnna 
McFarlane, Matthew Mortcnscn, 



Crane criticizes postal service 
cash bonus awards plan 

Eighth District Congressman Philip M Crane criticized the U.S. 
Postal Service for its proposal to offer cash bonus awards to many of 
the Postal Service's top managers if the agency keeps its losses this year 
to no more than $1 .3 billion. 

"It's only a year since the Postal Service put a massive reorganiza- 
tion plan into effect," Congressman Crane declared, "and it is hardly 
appropriate to offer bonuses to managers if they meet Financial goals." 

The congressman also noted that next week the Postal Board of 
Governors will vote on a proposed postage increase. It is believed the 
Board of Governors will vote to push the cost of mailing a first-class let- 
ter from 29 cents to 32 cents. 

"Just three years ago the first-class rate went from 25 cents to 29 
cents, and now, faced with another 10 percent increase, the Postat 
Service wants to further add to its operating costs by offering bonuses 
to their executives to carry out their jobs," Congressman Crane added. 

Again in this Congress, the congressman has introduced legislation 
th*|would privatize the U.S. Postal System, putting an end to the gov- 
ernment-owned monopoly. 

His bill would give all assets of the Post Office to a corporation 
owned b the employees through the creation of an employee stock- 
ownership plan (ESOP) which would transfer stock to the employees. 
Regulations would assure that the rural service and general perfor- 
mance standards exceed current levels. 



LakclANd ClAssifieds 
(708)227-8161 



f 



CUSTOM 
GOLF CLUBS 



Backed By A 

Year 
Guarantee! 

Against manufacturing defects 



Offering Most 
Major Pro-Line' 

clubs 

We'll match or 

beat any price 

(WITH VEMlFlOmON) 



• High Quality • Low Prices 

&o~&*€ie *§o(? "Genie* 



Hours 

OPEN 7 Days 
.9 until Dusk 



(815) 675-2747 

36 Year* of Customizing 
Lessons available wllh PGA Pro 



WO Route 12 

Spring Grove, IL 

60081 



Sarah Murray, Gcncvtcvc Osmond,. 

Christopher Passarclla, Rochcllc 
Paull, Erlcka I'crrinc, Jason Rcdfern, 
Itashida Rihman, Keith Rollcnc, 
Rebecca Rommcn, Brian Roscmann, 
Bradley Rubash, Jamie Ryan, Jon 
Schultz II, Justin Scope!, Elizabeth 
Shehorn, Rebecca Smallcy, Steven 
Spronk, Todd Stand, Christopher 
Swelling, Dale Thlclc, Jill Thompson, 
James Wldo, Heidi Wirtz, Ann 
Wltbrod, Heather Worshlll, Ryan 
Zeman, Jonathan Zora. 
Sophomores 

Diana Abruzzi, Kevin Arft, JoAnnc 
Banks, Kristin Beadle, Stephanie 
Bcall, Melissa Becker, William Bell, 
Nnello Rcrnabc, Timothy Bogdala, 
Andrew Bogenschutz, Mark Bonovitz, 
John Booth, Jcanctte Boyd, Lauren 
Burke, Christopher Carlson, Dustln 
Cogdill, Katie Cox, Heather Cramond, 
Paula Cziczo, Andrew Davis, Dawn, 
DcSprvl, Colin Dent, Michael Dcnzcl, 
Brian DcRuc, Megan Durney, Jcnna 
Gckcrt, Lindsay Edwards, Kevin 
Fasana, Klmbcrly Fischer, Matlhcw 
Fleming 

David Gagnc, Michelle Gallnis, 
Angelina Glangiori, John Groth, 
Jessica Gurtowskl, Jana Hagglund, 
John Hall, Col cue Hardy, Tad Harper, 
Emily Hartlng, Matt Hlinak, Sharon 
Jcncwicn, Susan Jcncwicn, Julie 
Johnson, Corinnc Julian, Michael 
Kelly, Nathan Kocpkc, Courtney 
Konralh, Klmbcrly Konrath, Pamela 
Koziorowski, Amy Kurth, Geoffrey 
Land rum, Angela Larson, Gregory 
Laubc, Jcanctte Lcftcr, Elizabeth 
Lcnnon, Walter Martens, Robin 
Mason, Justin McRac. 

Charles Miles, Jaime Miles, 
Catherine Mitchell, Jason Mondello, 
Brian Murphy, Sarah Murphy, Emily 
Peterson, Jennifer Peterson, Dana 
Plcrson, Carole Plesc, Jason Prather, 
Tobias Roberts, Tina Salonen, Anna 
Sanchez, Lisa Schacfcr, Matthew 
Schucneman, Emily Scto, Rebecca 
Sladck, Stefan Sladck, Chris Smallcy, 
Christopher Smith, Kristcn Smith, 
Megan Sosnowskl, Rheanna 
Sleinburg, Heather Suchy, Russell 
Todd, Aaron Totter, Tracy Vlrag, 
Dcbrah Warner, David Warren, Brian 
Weeks, Elizabeth Wegncr, Anna 
Weiler, Sara Welker, Robert Zcll me r. 
Freshmen 

Jacqulyn Anderson, Rebecca Ayre, 
Susan Barr, Joanne Barricnlos, Erica 
Becker, Melissa Beckcy, Tom Bcitzcl, 
Marissa Blasko, Erica Bonovitz, 
Kenneth Brat Ion, Shana Brown, Eric 
Bubash, Amber Cashmore, Kevin 
Chudd, Jeffcry Crivello, Lindscy 
Dean, Kelly Dcbcrnardis. 

Aposlalos Diamantopoulos, Amy 
Dlctz, Laura Duetsch, Daniel Elfering, 
Scott Fcdor, Matthew Fleming, Brian 
Forth, Sara Fox, Erlka Fransisco, 
Carrie Gofron, Andrew Green, Alyssa 
Griffin, Paul Grob, Stephanie 
Hacnchcn, Melissa Hague, Neil 
Hansen, Julie Haslcr, Audra Hazners, 



Teresa Hebron, Matthew Hciimann, 
Jamie Hope, Stephen Hovey, Norccn 
Johnson, Stuart Johnson, Cynthia 
Jones, Michael Kccfe, Bryan Koch, 
Elizabeth Koeck, Natalia Kolasa. 

Carrie . Kowalczyk, Rebecca 
Krockcr, Nicole Larson, William 
Lcnon, Sophia Llarakos, Tammy 
Lind, Sondra Lorang, Colleen 
McCandless, .Marian McElroy, Erin 
McMcnamin, Krislinc Micdcma, Joan 
Miles, Amanda Miller, Colleen 
Mllncr, Kathryn Morse, Daniel 
Mortcnscn, Elizabeth Moyano, Lisa 
Murphy, Jessica Nauseda, Chris 
Olandcse, Rllcsh Patcl, Debbie Perry, 
Eric Peters, Blake Pfau, Christopher 
Phillips, Arln Plcard, Ramya Plllai, 
Christopher Placko. 

Mark Prosisc, Adam Rcidcl, Emily 
Router, Shannon Rosbcrg, Lisa Rudin, 
Christopher Schultz, Eric Schultz, 
Daryl Scott, Jamie Silarski, Melissa 
Simbrowsky, April Smith, Jamie 
Soblc, Chris Sormalis, Paul Spronk, 
Erin Tlllcy, Danny Watkins, Nathan 
Welch, Christie Wcnszcll, Daniel 
Wicgcl, Julie Williams, Michclc 
Witbrod, Donald Yoakcm, Stcfanlc 
ZerbsL 
Honor roll 
Seniors 

Jennifer Allen, Lisa Anderson, 
Benjamin Antonelli, Amy.Baumunk, 
Natalie Bcdnarczyk, Klmbcrly Bcncs, 
Daniel Bctkc, John Bcttasso, Ann 
Braun, Jonathan Camp, Jennifer 
Carlson, Ryan Cogdill, Jamie Davis, 
James Da we, Elizabeth Earl, Helen 
Exarhakos, Thomas Furlan, Marc 
Ganlar, Ryan Garrett, Bobble Glcs, 
Rene Coins, Jeremy Govckar, Lisa 
Hcywood, Kathy Holmes, Andrew 
Hoist, Lubomir Hutan, Benjamin 
Jansky, Rcncc Jensen, David Johnson, 
Rcnec Joseph, Nicole Kudzin, Martin 
Kuhn, 

Kelly Landgren; Jayme Lconhart, 
Karen Lepianka, Joseph Loffrcdo, 
April Lunsford, Sara Lutz, Amy 
Martin, Cindy Molt, David Nader, 
Melissa Nathan, Kelly ' Nauretz, 
Christine Nelson, Sean Noland, Maria 
Nolls, Hasmukh Patcl, Matthew 
Persman, Jason Peters, Jennifer 
Reining, Lisa Roscmann, Jim 
Schintcr, Rcinhard Schmld, Keltic 
Scallay, Eric Scnica, Susan Stahl, 
Tracy Stein, Jessica Stella, Laurc 
Suchcckc, Kellu Sullivan, Matthew 
Vandrush, Stephanie Witwicki, Phillip 
Zcllmer. 
funlors 

Christa Badamc, Michael Barr, 
Patrick Barton, Lane Bcnzigcr, Nicole 
Bock, Beth Bocrman, William 
Bratten, Babara Coatar, Molly Cox, 
Sabrina Cox, Stacey Crivello, Carrie 
Curtis, Nichole Defer, Paula 
Duckhorn, Dcmetra Exarhakos, 
Amanda Foster, Stacic Foster, Jamie 
Gaa, Theresa Greer, Adam Haley, 
Melissa Halvcy, Victor Henderson, 
Aaron Hcnsgen, Kurt Hintz, Keith 
Jackson, Jesse Kadera, Scott Karg, 



Mlshcllc Kocal. 

Erin Krantz, Jason Krausc, Michael 
Lindscy, Michelle Llpski, Martina 
Markovics, Paul McFarlane, 
Stephanie Montgomery, Christopher 
Morse, Shannon Nixon, Jeanine 
Olscn, Gregory Panscy; ; Brad Prlllcr, 
Lisa Rcljoncn, Jalmcc Rlnchart, David 
Rohrcr, • Erin • Roman, Amy 
Schottcnlqhcr, Jenny Schultz, Jeremy 
Schultz, Sharon Screda, Amanda 
Sproull, Jeff Stccher, Tina Stochmal, 
Allison Studcr, Joshua Zclicr, Marissa 
Zolna, 
Sophomores 

Heather Anton, Amber Bccman, 
Anncliesc Boehm, Staccy Bohlman, 
Eric Burgess, Kelly Burrell, Eric 
Campbell, Ryan Carlson, David Cox, 
Craig Curtis, Ryan Dunn, Theresa 
Eckard, Steven Eiscn, AJrcdln Elcz, 
Razijc Etcz, Macgan Fleming, Alyson 
Gantar, Brian Geigcr, Kevin Gcraghty, 
Bryan Goblirsch, Jennifer Godhardt, 
Kirstopher Haucnstcin, Andrew 
Honakcr, Joanne Jcdclc, Christine 
Kirchner, Lisa Lewis, Tom Loar, 
Michael Mandro, Kenneth Matcckl, 
Nicholas McCann, Gary McMillan, 
Matthew Miodonski. 

Glna Mueller, Donna Myers, Zack 
Nagel, Timothy Nelson, Cystal 
(TBrien, Andy 6'Bryant, Erin 
O'Connell, Douglas Olson, Ervlns 
Otankls, Tricia Padgct, Mukesh Patcl, 
Gordon Pcrsha, Christine Pinto, Carly 
Pocious, Lisa Priller, Michael Rcitz, 
Charlie Reynolds, Mclanic Rodgcrs, 
Marlon Rodriguez, Rcglna Rossi, 
Tonya Roy, Patrick Runyard, Laurie 
Sarcnac, Steven Schemmcl, Matthew 
Schmitt, Richard Siebcrt, Richard 
Simpson, Jr., Joseph Stccher, Anthony 
Tournis. 

Freshmen 

Megan Aronson, Elizabeth Bailey, 
Brandon Barker, Justin Bchiing, 
Joseph Brugman, Anastasia Cameron, 
Timothy Cizanskas, Lcia Cuenco, 
Linda DcSalvo, Paul DcSalvo, Steven 
Drengter, Rodney DuPont, Amet Elez, 
Jason Erlenborn, Ariannc Furguson, 
Nicholas Petting, Shane Fielder, Scott 
Gilliland, Lenny Hagenow, Samantha 
Hartc, Lauren . Hilgcr, Allison 
Honakcr, Cheryl Jackson, Emily*- 
Johnson, George Katris, Nicklaus 
Kirichkow, Nicole Krai, Mike 
Lcnczuk. 

Bret Libigs, Amanda Long, 
Stephen MacMilian, Alec McKi nicy, 
Jcanna Milter, Nancy Nassr, Stacy 
Olcson, Elizabeth Ortman, Sharon 
Prcskill, Lisa Ravagni, Charray Rellly, 
Scan Robertson, Bressa Rosello, Rlna 
Russell, Karen Scharf, Anthony 
Schcib, Michael Sesslcr, Kimbcrly 
Small, Brian Smith, Mark Smith, 
Michael Sodaro, Jenny Sorokowskl, 
Sara Sproull, Melissa Steward, 
Andrew Studcc, Steven Weston, 
Joseph Winner, Joshua Zahora, Cindy 
Zambia, 




g/ 



Come WoreJhip With Us 

A Directory Of Antioch Area Churches 

Gracaland Baptttt Church. 258 Ida 5!., Antioch, II. Children's Program 7 a.m., Tubs. Women's Fellowship & 

Sunday School 1 1 a.m.,Momlng Worship 1 1 a.m., Bible Study 9-1 1:30 am. Jeff Brussaly, Pastor, 

Sunday Evening 7 p.m. Robert Williams, Pastor 

First Church of Christ, Scientist & Reading Rm. Rle. 
173 and Harden, Antioch. Phone (708) 395-1196. Sunday 
School, Sunday Church Service 10:30 a.m. Wednesday, 
8 p.m. 

Calvary Baptist Church. 554 Parkway. Phone (708) 
395-3393. Sunday School 10 a.m., Sunday Worship 
1 1 am. and 7 p.m. Pastor, Rev. Uoyd G. Moss. Jr. 

SL Ignatius Episcopal, 977 Main St., Phone (708) 395- 
0852. Low Mass 7:30 a.m., High Mass 8:30 a.m. Sunday 
School & Nursery 9:30 am. 

Antioch Evangelical Free Church. Tiffany Rd. Phone 
(708) 395-4117. Sunday School 9:30 a.m., Sunday 
Worship 8: 15 a.m. and 1 1 am., Children's Church 
1 1 am. Nursery both services. Awana Club, 6:30 p.m. 
Wednesday. 

St Stephen Lutheran Church. Hillside & Rte. 59. Phone 
(708) 395-3359. Sunday Worship, 8 and 10:00 a.m. 
Church School 9:15 a.m., Sunday Rev. Charles E. Miller, 
Pastor. 

Christian Una Fellowship Assemblies ot God Church. 
41625 Deep Lake Rd.. Antioch. Phone (708) 395-8572. 
Sunday School (all ages) 9 am., Sunday Morning 
Worship 10 am,, Children's Church 10 am„Sunday 
Evening Worship 6:30 p.m., Wednesday Worship 4 



Faith Evangelical Lutheran. 1275 Main SL Phone (708) 
395-1600. Sunday Worship 6 & 10:30 a.m., Sunday 
School 9:25 a.m. , Mon. 7 p.m. Rev. Darald Gruen, Rev. 
Gregory Harrnanson, Pastors. Christian Day School (708) 
395-1664. 

Millburn Congregational United Church ol Christ 
Grass Lake Rd. at Rle. 45 Phono (70B) 356-5237. 
Sunday service 10 am. Children's program 10- am. Rev. 
Paul R. Meltzer, Pastor. 

United Methodist Church of Antioch. 848 Main SL 
Phone (708) 395*1259. Worship at 8:30 am. & 10:45' 
am. Church School • classes tor all ages. 9:30 am. The 
Rev. Kurt A. Gamlin, Pastor. 

St Peter's Church. 557 W. Lake St., Antioch. Phone 
(708) 395-0274. Masses weekdays, 7:15 & B am., 
Sunday 6:30, 8, 9:30, 1 1 a.m. & 12: 15 p.m. Saturday 
5:30 p.m, Pastor Rev. Father Lawrence Kanley. 

Chain of Lakes Community Bible Church. 23201 W. 
Grass Lake Rd., Antioch, Phone (708) 838-0103 Sunday 
Worship 8:15 and 10:45. Sunday School 9:45. Children's 
Church 10:45. Youth, Women's, Awana & Small Group 
ministries. Senior Pastor, Rsv. DowS wasting. 

Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (Missouri Synod), 
25100 W. Grand Ave. (Bts, 59 & 132). Lake Villa, (708) 
356-5158. Sunday Worship 8:15 & 10:45 am.; Sunday 
School (3 and up) and Bible Study 9:30 am. Rev. John 
Zelimer, Pastor, Christian Preschool. 




Dan Dugenske, Director 
This Directory Presented As A Community Service By 

Strang Funeral Home of Antioch 



j ... - 1 . 



.. ..... ••-!.,.» ij^i^,.-. ^^..» .. - 



MarcIiII, 1994 UkclANd. Newspapers COMMUNITY 



Letters TO TriE EdJTOR 



Student urges 'yes' vote 

Editor 

I am writing in concern of the 
flyer circulated by B.E.S.T. 's sup- 
porter, Mr. Vcrn A. Holmes. I am 
a junior currently enrolled at 
ACHS and am involved with 
many various after-school activi- 
ties, as well as the National 
Honor Society. I am very dis- 
turbed with some of the informa- 
tion provided about the school in 
regard to the referendum vote 
and would like to discuss them 
further. 

As stated in the flyer, B.E.S.T. 
feels that "if they (ACHS) would 
spend it (money) on education 
first and stop accommodating 
every sport and extracurricular 
activity imaginable," the school 
would have enough money. But 
what is high school without 
sports and clubs? Sports develop 
a sense of healthy competition 
and afford many students the 
.opportunity to attend college 
through scholarships. 

B.E.S.T. also criticizes the fact 
that we have bowling during 
school hours instead of French as 
a foreign language. Having 
French would still cost the tax- 
payers more money because the 
school would have to hire more 
teachers to teach the class. 
Bowling is offered as a physical 
education activity and the stu- 
dent must pay a $17 fee to enroll 
in order to cover the bowling 
alley usage and bus transporta- 
tion, costing the school little, if no 
money at all. 

Further into the flyer, B.E.S.T. 
complains that the teachers' 
salary increases must stop. 
Today, with the high inflation of 
the economy, job competition is 
at its highest. If the teachers! 
salaries aren't increased to keep 
up with the economy, they will 
leave and go to another school 
that will, thus leaving fewer 
teachers to teach an increasing 
number of students. 

B.E.S.T, says to "compare your 
eight hour work day to their five 
hour work day." In my three years 
at ACHS, I have experienced a 
sense of dedication to the stu- 
dents .from the teachers that is 
certainly above and beyond the 
call of duty. Here is a factual 
example of just one of our dedi- 
cated teachers and to the amount 
of hours that they put into their 
job. 

On March 3, Mr. Tom Kcsscll 
arrived at school at 7:30 a.m., car- 
ried out his normal school sched- 
ule until 4 p.m., then left with the 
ACHS math team to Evanston, 
not returning to Antioch until 
10:45 p.m. I would call this giving 
110 percent effort to his job. He is 
just one of many dedicated 
teachers at ACHS. I feel that his 
level of dedication deserves com- 
parable monetary reward, don't 
you? 

Most of all, B.E.S.T. continues 
to complain about the decrease 
of ACHS's academic ranking. I 
strongly believe that this is due to 
the limited "space" that the 
teachers have to work with. 
Common classes arc so extreme- 
ly large that not enough individ- 
ual time from the teacher is dedi- 
cated to the students, in order to 
concentrate more on the stu- 
dents' strengths. 

When B.E.S.T. decided to 
divide the number of students In 
the school by the number of 
teachers currently employed to 
get an "average" class size of stu- 
dents per teacher, they did not 



take Into consideration those stu- 
dents needing special help/atten- 
tion and arc In special education 
classes. Nor did they take into 
consideration the small number 
who take the advanced place- 
ment classes because they want 
the challenging background 
before college. It is not possible, 
in any way, to classify the stu- 
dents at ACHS as a whole and 
i simply divide them among teach- 
ers. 

To bring this issue to a close, I 
firmly believe B.E.S.T.. has no 
right to call the school board 
"dysfunctional" as quoted in the 
flyer. They arc simply a group of 
people trying to do what is best 
for the school. They arc under a 
. lot of stress and have a lot of diffi- 
cult decisions to make, Many 
people may not be happy with 
past decisions that they have 
made, myself included, but their 
main intention was and always 
will be to make decisions that will 
benefit the school in the long run. 

I would like to know how 
many members of B.E.S.T. 
attended the school board meet- 
ings prior to the referendum 
issue. It's unfortunate that every- 
thing has to come down to 
money. We all want more of It, 
myself included. It's just so sad 
that people arc willing to step on' 
the education of their children to 
save a buck. Somebody paid for 
your education, so please, some- 
body pay for ours. Our education 
now affects our success later in 
life. 

You may not have kids in high 
school and figure you shouldn't 
have to pay the extra money, but 
your future lies in our hands, so 
please make it the best future you 
can and vote "yes" for the refer- 
endum. Not to mention the next 
time B.E.S.T. would like to invade 
the teachers' private lives by 
printing their persona] salaries, at 
least give them credited respect 
by spelling their names correctly. 

Please, everyone, take another 
look, our educational process 
needs your help. Our future lies 
in your hands. This isn't all about 
money,, it's about education; 
tomorrow's future. Vote "yes" on 
March 15. 

Leah Luddcn 

Class of 1995 

Antioch Community High School 

Best makes mistake 

Editor 

With respect to Antioch 
Community High School's urging 
a "Yes" vote on the Education 
Fund Referendum, the biggest 
and latest mistake B.E.S.T. has 
made was to make a presentation 
at the Forum sponsored by the 
Alliance for Better Government, 
at State Bank of the Lakes. Mr. 
Knutscn and Mr. Warrcndcr, 
from B.E.S.T, absolutely could 
not defend their facts, their data 
and their positions which have 
been used for two . years to 
deceive voters. The audience of 
over 100 people was absolutely 
appalled. The forum should have 
been videotaped so all the voters 
could be astonished for them- 
selves. B.E.S.T. destroyed itself. 
People will be dismayed at the 
travesty of what has occurred for 
two years. - 

Previous "no" voters will be 
embarrassed and infuriated that 
they were so misled by B.E.S.T., 
which has harmed the high 
school, district businesses, real 
estate, the community and the 
students. 



For new voters or undecided 
voters, the Issue is clear; only 
Antioch Community High School 
has been telling the truth based 
on accurate facts and has been 
maximizing its resources, but 
docs seriously need and has 
needed more funding for two 
years. Citizens will vote "yes" on 
March 15. 

Ron Chilcotc 
Lake Villa 



Vote yes 

Editor 

• jHcrc we go again. The Antioch 
Township High School 
Referendum is coming up for a 
vote on March 15. The issue that 
just won't die. The reason it won't 
die is because the school board, 
teachers, administrators, most 
parents and students understand 
the importance of getting the ref- 
erendum for supplementing the 
Education Fund passed. 

The local organization that 
calls itself BEST is doing the 
whole school district a disfavor in 
the name of good tax steward- 
ship. Their shortsightedness, and 
narrow focus in holding on to 
every dollar they have is hurting 
the community at large. 

It is becoming common 
knowledge that Antioch 
Community is near the top of 
schools whose classrooms are 
overcrowded, teachers under- 
paid, extra activities limited and 
facilities that are less than "state 
of the art." I thought it was com- 
mon sense that a community 
whose schools are top notch can 
expect property values to rise and 
attract families and Individuals 
who. want to make their home in 
a town where education and 
youth arc at the top of the priori- 
ty list. 

I liked the flyer sent out that 
gave the approximate cost for the 
average homeowner if this refer- 
endum passes. The price of a 
pizza per month! We would all be 



healthier and slimmer if wc gave 
up that pizza anyway. Folks,' it is 
high time wc band together and 
tell the truth. BEST has the worst 
possible program for our com- 
munity. Think it over and vote 
yes on March 15. The future of 
our area is at stake. 

Jim Bcatty 
Antioch 

Mismanagement 

Editor: 

This will be the third time in 
less than a year that the Board of 
Education of Antioch's District 
1 17 High School has attempted to 
deceive the public by calling 
these refcrendums "education." 

These refcrendums arc not 
from actual need but rather due 
to mismanagement of school 
financing and continuing deficit 
spending. The nearly bankrupt 
pork barrel school district is a 
hungry monster that demands 
being fed enormous amounts of 
taxpayer money. 

As you may be aware, a finan- 
cial warning letter was sent to the 
district last June by Patrick 
Toomey, finance manager for the 
State of Illinois. The letter was a 
warning showing that the district 
financial position was in "danger 
and the school should take pre- 
cautions with spending, or it 
would be placed on the State of 
Illinois' financial watch list." 

Incredibly, with this warning 
letter plus five failed refcrendums 
under their belts since 1991, who 
would have expected the arro- 
gant school board to even think 
of increasing the pay of any 
employee, let alone administra- 
tors? I cannot imagine a more 
incredible poor judgment or poor 
timing call than this district's 
increasing salaries and giving 
away a 2.53 and a 9 percent raise 
for certified and non-certified 
staff, a truly unconscionable act. 

This March 15 referendum is 
to cover up ^thc "mismanage- 
ment," escalating and pay raises 



given away by the Board of 
Education. 

Vem A. Holmes 
• Antioch' 



Where to Write 
Representatives 

U.S. Senators 
Paul Simon (D) 

230 S. Dearborn St. 

m 

Room 3892 - 
Chicago," IL60604 
426Dlrksen Senate Office 
Washington, D.C. 20510 
Carol Moseley-Braun (D) 
230 S. Dearborn St. 
Room 3996 
Chicago, IL 60604 
320 Hart Senate Bldg. 
Washington, D.C. 2051 
U.S. Representatives 
Philip Crane (R) 
8th Congressional Dlst. 
1450 S. New Wllke.Rd. 
Suite 101 

Arlington Heights, IL 60005 
233 Cannon House 
Office Bldg. 

Washington, DC 20515 . 
State Senators 
Adeline Geo-Karis 
31st Senatorial Dist. 
2612 Sheridan Rd„ 
Suite 213 ZioalL 60099 
323 State House 
Springfield, IL 62706 
State Representatives 
Robert Churchill 
62nd Representative Dist. 
976 Hillside Ave. 
Antioch, IL 60002 
Room 300 State House 
Springfield, IL 62706 



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COMMUNITY UkUd Newspapers Ma.cI* 11, 1914 



'..■■■■3 



Voters 



Precinct committeemen make bids 



From page Al 

past two weeks. While the 
Democratic candidate, Richard 
Jablonski is running unopposed, 
incumbent Sheriff Clint Grinncll 
has been duking it out all over the 
county with Republican chal- 
lenger Ed Sindles. Temperatures 
have been rising in the press con- 
ference battles between the two. 
Voters will also need to con- 
sider increasing the tax cap to 
build and staff a new juvenile 
detention center for the county. 
The cost of this referendum 
would increase property taxes on 
a $150,000 home to $1 a month. 
However, some voters have 
expressed concerns about the 
ramifications of lifting the tax cap. 

Referendum 

From page Al 

The class size was at 22.6 per 
class for the 1992-93 school year. 
For the 1993/94 year the school 
projects the class size is at 26. 
Other taxing bodies have 
endorsed the referendum. Some 
of the endorsements include: 
Antioch Village Board, Antioch 
Township Board, Lake Villa Village 



Zoning — 

From page Al **-* 
that property is located in the 
northern section of Antioch, west 
of Channel Lake on Sunset. 

"In 1908 this was commercial- 
residential property," said 
Domanchuk to the board. "You 
made It countryside in 1988. 
What you did, when you did that, 
was make it non-conforming." 

. Apparently, just prior to the 
purchase of the land, 
Domanchuk was notified of the 
planned zoning change. As a 
result, he paid a reduced amount 
for the property and has attempt- 
Lake County offers 
family scholarships 

The Lake County Association 
for Family and Community 
Education (formerly known as 
the Lake County Homemakers 
Extension Association) is seeking 
applicants for the annual scholar- 
ships awarded in memory of 
Helen Johnson Volk. 

Application forms are avail- 
able at the Lake County 
Cooperative Extension Office, 
100 S. Hwy. 45, Grayslake, and 
through counselors at high 
schools in the county. 

All applicants must have been 
accepted in college as a full time 
student working towards a 
degree, rank in the upper half of 
their high school class, have been 
a Lake County 4-H member for at 
least three years or their mother 
must currently be a member of 
the LCAFCE and have been a 
member in good standing for a 
minimum of three years. 

An LCAFCE member working 
toward a degree as a part-time 
student may apply for a scholar- 
ship based on the number of 
credit hours, Scholarship not to 
exceed the cost of credit hours to 
said member. 

Applications will be reviewed 
by the Scholarship Committee 
and winners will be selected in 
time to be announced at Honors 
Day ceremonies. 

Deadline for application Is 
May 1. For further information, 
call 362-1066. 



Residents will also be asked to 
decide the fate of the Chain O' 
Lakes Fox River Waterway 
Management Agency. A sunset 
clause, which could end the 
waterway agency operations by 
Dec. 31, 1994, will take effect if the 
referendum question on continu- 
ance falls to receive voter's 
approval. 

Antioch Community High 
School Is also looking to the tax- 
payers once again to Increase the 
tax- rate from 1.32 percent to 1.67 
percent or a 26 percent increase. 

As a result of extreme over- 
crowding Emmons School District 
has placed a building addition ref- 
erendum for $1.4 million. 



MARY FQIEY 




Staff Reporter • 

Peter Lczcau, a five-year resi- 
dent of Antioch, is making a bid 
for Republican precinct commit- 
teeman In precinct 14. Lezeauhas 
been married for 15 years and Is a 
technical representative for 
Grainger. He is a commissioner 
on both the downtown redevelop- 
ment committee and the econom- 
ic development committee. 

"I'm running to become more 
involved in local politics and to 
help and assist residents of my 
precinct," explained Lezcau. "I 
also look forward to working with 
the • other members of the 
Republican Party." 

Wayne Forcsta is a candidate 
for precinct committeemen for 
the 12th precinct He is currently 



a Trustee on the Antioch Village 
Board, a member of CAN, and also 
a member of the Lions Club, He 
has been married for 14 years and 
has three daughters. 

"Like most of the residents of 
the village, 1 am concerned with 
the well being of my community," 
said Forcsta "All too often we 
have the attitude that there is 
nothing we can do to help our 
community. A committeeman 
can have a real Impact on county 
and state government, by helping 
to set goals and policies. That's 
why I have decided to run for 
precinct committeeman for the 
12th district." 

Leon Booth is running for 
Republican committeeman in 
precinct 10. He Is married with 
five children, and has been a resi- 



dent of Antioch for four years. He 
owns his own business, L U A 
Contracting. 

"I am of the conservative view- 
point/' explains Booth. "I support 
open government, hot back room 
deals," Booth is a supporter of 
term limits. 

Larry Hanson Is running for the 
4th precinct. He is a lifetime resi- 
dent of Antioch and a 1978 graduate 
of Antioch High School. He served 
as a trustee for the Village of Antioch 
from 1989 to 1993, when he ran for 
mayor of Antioch. 
. Hanson is a well-known mem- 
ber of the community and served 
two years as president of the 
Antioch Chamber of Commerce. 
He is the manager of BJ's Store for 
Men and was involved in the cre- 
ation of Community Action Now, 



Board, Lake Villa Township Board 
and Llndenhurst Village Board, 

In opposition to the referen- 
dum is Best Education Sensible 
Taxes (BEST) which claims the 
school Is collecting sufficient 
funds from increased federal aid 
and real estate taxes. The group 
notes real estate taxes mounted 
from 1991 to 1992. 



cd, since then, to get it rczoncd to 
commercial. Neighbors living in 
the surrounding areas object to 
the rczoning. Armed with peti- 
tions, the neighbors hoped to 
have the property rczoncd resi- 
dential. 

"If it Is rezoncd, how will it 
affect the property?" asked a con- 
cerned neighbor, "Will bars, 
marinas, taverns, and camp- 
grounds be permitted." 

According to the board, com- 
mercial uses would be allowed, 
presuming an independent sewer 
system could be approved. 

There was unanimous rejec- 
tion of the zoning changes for the 
Domanchuk property by the 
board. However, board members 
began discussing their role In 
zoning changes. They also voiced 
concerns about "setting policy" 
as opposed to correcting errors. 
Since the new framework plan 
has not yet been adopted, the 
board was worried about making 
changes not suggested by staff. 




Pete Lezeau 



Wayne Foresta 



Larry Hanson 



Rally sponsored by CCCA 



A pre-election rally sponsored 
by the CCCA (Concerned 
Citizens for the Continuation of 
the Agency) was to take place 
Thursday, March 10. 

The event with raffles going 
on all night long, snacks and 
music, was to be held at the 
McHenry VFyV hall on Rte. 120 
starting at 6:30 p.m. 

First prize was a cruise and 
dinner oh the Dobyns house 
boat, donated by Dobyns House; 
second prize was a boat slip for 
the 1994 season donated by Bald 
Knob Marina; third prize was a 
half day of use of a Sport Fishing 
Charter on Lake Michigan for 4 
people donated by Thompson 
Charters; fourth prize was a 4- 



picce soft Samsonltc luggage Set 
donated by Worldwide Traveler 
LTD; fifth prize was a one-hour 
Helicopter Tour of the Chain for 
one person donated by Chuck 



Werth; and sixth prize was a $300 
cash prize, anonymous donation. 
Staff from the waterway 
agency was on hand to help with 
the celebration. 




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get key to 
village 



MARY FOLEY 



Staff Reporter 

The Antioch Community 
High School bowling team 
has received a commenda- 
tion as well as the key to the . 
village for an outstanding 
performance at. the Illinois 
Girls' State . Bowling 
Tournament. The team 
placed 5th out of 110 teams 
from throughout the state. 

Coached by Elliot 
Hoffedltz, the team first 
placed third at their confer- 
ence tournament. They 
went on to win their section. 
They had the highest section 
score in the state and quail- 
fled all Ave bowlers as Indi- 
viduals for the state tourna- 
ment. • 

During the first day of the 
state competition, the team 
was in the top 12. By the sec- 
ond day, they had made the 
final cut. Antioch ultimately 
placed 5th. 

"This is the most success- 
ful team 1 have coached," 
said Hoffedltz. "And, I have 
coached for six years." 

Team members include 
Nlkkl Hal! was, Lisa 
Anderson, Jeanlne Olscn, 
Sara Steward, and Joy 
Rollene. 




'Little buddy' 

Round Lake boys track 
coach Kevin Dempsey, 
left, chats with Jim 'Big 
Cat' Williams during a 
lighter moment. There 
were, many such 
moments as Bears play- 
ers took on Round Lake 
faculty Sunday.— Photo 
by Steve Peterson 



Ozga helps 
Millikin gain 
le title 




An Antioch High gradu- 
ate helped the Millikin 
University women's basket- 
ball team to its first post-sea- 
son appearance In five years 
and Its fifth In the 13-year 
history of the NCAA Division 

in; 

Sue Ozga, a 5-7 junior 
guard, Is on the team which 
went 22-3 In earning an 
automatic berth in the 40- 
team field by winning the 
College Conference of 
Illinois and Wisconsin cham- 
pionship. 



Earl's state bid, co-league 
title highlights for wrestlers 



A state qualifier and a co-con- 
ference championship provided 
highlights for Antioch High's 
wrestling team. 

Joe Earl qualified at 152 
pounds, but was eliminated early 
in the Class AA meet at 
Champaign. 

The team wrestled in the team 
regional round, against 
Waukegan, but lost to the 
Bulldogs, who went on to finish 
fourth in the state. 

Among the key seniors the 
Sequolts will miss will be heavy- 
weight Mike Shea, a sectional 
qualifier. 

"Shea always had a good work 



ethic and was a good role 
model," Coach Ted Stcckowski 
said. 

The rookie mentor also 
praised Chris Petykowskl for his 
hard work at 1 19 and Chris Haag, 
another team leader at 189. 

Lucas Dyer, 103-poundcr, just 
missed qualifying for state. "He 
saw what he needed to do to got 
there," Stcckowski said. 

Antioch, 15-8 In duals, shared 
the NSC tide with Llbertyvllle, 
The Wildcats won the conference 
meet, but the Sequolts won the 
dual meet 

"We have a good nucleus back 
for next year. 




Seeking pin 



Chris Petykowskl of Antioch closes In on a pin, He wrestled at 
119 pounds for the Sequolts. Antioch plans on a strong 
nucleus for next year.— Photo by Gene Gabry. 




Lakeland 

Newspapers 



Rams prove they earned fourth seed with regional title 



STEVE PETERSON ._ 

Staff Reporter 

It was a moment worth 
putting on videotape forever at 
Grayslake High School. 

There was Geoff Sponholtz, a 
senior, halfway up die ladder, 
ready to cut the cord of the net, 
regional trophy In hand, follow- 
ing a 79-73 thriller over Deerfleld. 

Sponholtz, who scored 18 
points and advanced to the sec- 
tional three-point shootout this 
memorable Friday night, recalls 
how the roots of the title were 
laid. 

"We would be here at 5:30 or 6 
a.m. and we worked hard in the 
off-season," he said. 

"We had big baskets. No one 
lost their composure at the end," 



Dave Mendralla, a junior, said. 

Mendralla scored 14 of his 31 
points from the free-throw line, 
where Grayslake was 21-for-24. 

"They always say free throws 
win games and Win champi- 
onships and tonight, they were 
the difference. I practiced free 
throws all week and felt confident 
they would go In/' Mendralla 
said. 

Mendralla was involved in the 
most Important of Grayslake 's 21 
field goals. With 2:30 left and his 
team clinging to a 65-64 lead, 
Mendralla took a perfect pass 
from Brian Stetch for a lay-up. 
The Rams would need just one 
more field goal after that, a hoop 
by Sponholtz for a six-point lead 
with 1:30 left. 



"It was our lob play and Jason 
Horvath set a great screen," 
Stetch, a senior, said. 

. "We have a lot of confidence 
now and that will help us going 
up against Mundclein. I aim really 
happy for Coach Greg Groth and 
the seniors. It is the biggest 
honor," Mendralla said. 

The Northwest Suburban 
Conference champs set a school 
record for each win, as they have 
now achieved a 20-6 record and a 
spot in the county's final four at 
Waukegan. They battled No. 5 in 
the state Mundclein in a rematch. 

"I am very, very happy. We 
really played a great first quarter 
and one-half. To their credit, they 
made a great run at the end of the 
half. They took the lead, but the 




Groyskike's Dove Mendralla (22) Met to get a shot pent the defense of DoemeM's Brian Panek (11) 
and Alan Prlmera <W). Mendralla scored 31 points as Rams claimed first regional title since 1965. 
Mendralla was further rewarded by being named the Most Valuable Player In the Northwest Suburban 
Conference. — Photo by m Carey. 



kids showed why they are cham- 
pions," Coach Groth said. 

"Mundclein is a very good 
team with great players. We hope 
to give them a good game." Groth 
said. "Deerfleld really played a 
good game. I thought we did a 
good job on Ryan Hogan." 

Megan, whom Groth called 
the best freshman he has seen, 
matched Mendralla's 31, but 27 
came In the first three quarters. 

"I am happy for the kids," 
Groth said. "I am happy for the 
players, the school, the commu- 
nity and all the players who have 
played here." 

Playing before a capacity 
house with banners with players* 
names, the Rams shot to a 17-12 
lead after one. It was a balanced 
attack, with Sponholtz (18 
points) and Mendralla both grab- 
bing 4 points. Sponholtz gave the 
home team its biggest lead, 27- 
14, with 5:19 left in the second. 

By halftimc, Deerfleld (10-17) 
was sizing the glass slipper again, 
as it cut the lead to three, 42-39. 

The Warriors actually took a 
three-point lead, 45-42, but the 
Rams recovered, forging a tie at 
50-50 on a Sponholtz hoop with 
3:30 left in the third. Two 
Mendralla free throws, a harbin- 
ger of things to come for DHS, 
gave the Rams a 57-52 lead after 
three. 

The fourth period started with 
two Todd Alfred free throws for a 
7-polnt margin. The lead looked 
safe when Grayslake earned a 9- 
point lead with five minutes left 

"1 think 1 have improved on 
my defense. I used to be lazy and 
you can't be lazy in the middle of 
a matchup," Sponholtz said. 

Indeed, the Warriors could 
not get their many inside shots to 
fall. 

Sponholtz said the Rams' 
inside game Improved since 
November. 

"John Miller and Brian 
Fischer (3 points) have stepped 
up their game," Sponholtz said. 

Senior Alfred (9 points) 
recalled how the group was 21-2 
as sophomores. 

like Sponholtz, he said he 
Improved on his defense. He now 
guards the likes ofjrfundeleln star 
Kyle Kessel. 

And no matter what took 
place in Waukegan, the Rams will 
have their moment to remember. 



*'■ 



C 



* #>aS 







COMMUNITY LvfclANd Ncws|ja|>ehs M/utck 11, 1994 







Richmond girls make history 



STEVE PETERSON 

Staff Reporter • 

Richmond-Burton girls bas- 
ketball coach Tom Lay wsaid it 
best 

"Well, you jnust saw a great 
high school basketball game and 
that is what it is all aboutt," Lay 
said. 

Great of course docs not 
guarantee winning, and 
Richmond will have ton settle for 
knowing it played in the most 
exciting Class A quarterfinal 
game before losing 40-46 to 
Willi amsvillc. 

Aftcrcward, Natalie Gambit 
and Atlyson McNabb walked 
down the ramp of the interview 
room at Illinois State University, 
one arm behind each other's 
back. 

It symbolized what this TEAM 
is all about -family. 

"I will remember this forever. 
We are all the best of friends," 
Gambit said. 

"I'm very happy with the way 
we played," Heidi Rcgnicr said. "I 
will 'remember how hard we 
worked all year." 

It was Rcgnicr (10 points, 8 
rebounds) who had the shot with 
two seconds left but could not get 
the ball off in time for it to count. 
Had it counted, it would have 
capped a miracle comeback from 
an II -point fourth quarter 
deficit. 

"The best team that ever 
came out of Richmond- Burton 
High School. Someone has to be 
in the final four. Kids did a great 
job, represented the conference 
well, the area," Lay said. 

Looking at the statistics, it 
appeared amazing that the 
Rockets came jwithin a few 
bounces of gaining a final four 
spot. Richmond shot 35 percent 
from the field, 50 percent from 
the free-throw line. Williamsvillc, 
relying on transition baskets, 
shot 50 percent from the field. 

The contest boiled down to 
two free throws with three sec- 
onds left by Williamsvilte's Lorri 
Sommcr. Sommcr and Jcssioca 
Langenbahn were the Lady 
Bullets offense, accounting for all 
but six points. 

Gambit scored 15 points and 
had 9 rebounds, but Julie Holian 
and Kathy Bcnes coupled with 
some extended defense got the 
Rockets back into this one. 

"That is what we needed to 
do. They collapsed on Natalie 
pretty well. Allyson, Kathy and 
Julie came up and hit some shots. 
Nice to have kids in your pro- 
gram who can do that," Lay said. 

Gambit had a rough shooting 
night, 6-for-14 from the field, but 
hit the most important of 
Richmond's hoops, a three- 
pointer for a 46-46 tic with :4fl 
left. 

"I felt after Kathy (Benes) hit 
the three-pointer, I felt the 
momentum switch. When I got 
the ball at the top of the key, I was 
wide open we were down three," 
Gambit said. 



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"The old saying - when in 
doubt, shoot," Lay said. 

Williamsvillc tipped the ball- 
out-of-bounds, although a foul 
could have been called. 
Richmond had to settle with the 
ball out of bounds. 

"We wanted to get Allyson in 
the corner for a three. We prac- 
tice this. If she isn't open, Heidi 
or Natalie is supposed to run to 
the basket. Heidi felt confident 
about taking a shot. She got her 
hand on it, but the horn went 
off," she said. 

Williamsvillc seemed to seal 
the win when Langenbahn hit a 
buzzcr-bcating shot at the end of 
the third quarter and scored on a 
fastbrcak for a 43-32 lead. 

"I think being prepared for 
the game helps you mentally. 
Last year we played at 9 a.m. It 
was like off the bus, go in there 



and play," Jane Grcbncr, 
Williamsvilte's fifth-year coach 
said. 

"We had a few turnovers and 
a few shots that did not get in," 
Grcbncr said. - 

"That was a great high school 
basketball game and that's what 
it is all about. We came back from 
1 1 down in the fourth quarter but 
just didn't get the win. 

"Tonight we got beat by a bet- 
ter team. I told the kids that they 
won 27 games and I lost two. It 
game down to the last shot and in 
a game like this it's just too back 
someone had to lose," Lay said. 

In 10 years, the records will 
not change - the score will be 
Williamsvillc 40, Richmond- 
Burton 46, but the school a three- 
point try away from the 
Wisconsin border will have its 
friendships and memories. 







In the final moments of the game, Richmond-Burton player Allyson 
McNabb dives for a loose ball. —Photo by Steve Young 



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Driving in 

Dave Lawrence of Antloch eyes the net In The Sequolts' loss 
to the Mustangs. Mundeleln later advanced to the section- 
als. —Photo by Steve Young 



Avon holds baseball sign up 



The final opportunity to regis- 
ter for Avon Township Youth 
Baseball (ATYB) for the upcom- 
ing season is being held in Round 
Lake March 12 from 10 am. to 4 
p.m. 

Youth ages 7 to 18 may sign 
up for baseball or Softball at the 
Round Lake Park District 
Community Center in the Senior 
Center Room located at B14 Hart 
Rd. in Round Lake. 

A copy of the player's birth 
certificate is required to be sub- 
mitted at registration unless die 
player participated with ATYB 
last summer. The certificate will 



not be returned. 

Cost is $45, $50 or $55, 
depending on the age of the play- 
er. 

Most ATYB teams begin 
scheduled play in early May. In 
the past registration was permit- 
ted until the season began; how- 
ever, due to scheduling and man- 
agement difficulties experienced 
last year, no registrations can be 
guarantee d a Iter March 1 2. - 

Any previous ATYB player 
who has not returned a uniform 
must do so before registering. For 
more information, call 223-9299. 



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Best of Show winner 




at BARS racing show 



JH«t 

. . .. . ■ •■.■•■ 






Landry Potter of Lake Geneva, Wis. defends his tlHo as "Best of Show" at BARS - Bablcz Auto Racing 
Services show at Lakehurst Mall. From left: Mike Bablcz; show queen Kaflna Grubb; Potter; Larry Roeck 
and Dave Sweeney, official starter for tndy 500. 

Mustangs rack up 3-pointers in regional 



A Lake Geneva, Wis. driver 
successfully defended his Best of 
Show honors at the 17th annual 
BARS Bablcz Auto Racing Show. 

Landry Potter took home the 
top honors at the show conclud- 
ed Sunday at Lakehurst Mall. 

Potter said he prepared for 
the four-day show by stripping 
the car and repainting it. 

He said the highlight of last 
year's racing season was winning 
a 30-lap featured race at Lake 
Geneva Raceway. 

"Comptition is close through- 
out the quarter-mile track," he 
said. 

His sponsors are: R.A. 
Addams of McHcnry; Trubo Blue 
Racing; First Auto of McHcnry 
and the Brat Stop in Kenosha. 

"My family has been in racing 
since I was a little boy," he said. 

He said the earliest BARS 
show ever was fun. 

Show sponsors included: 
Lakehurst Mall Merchants Assn.; * 
Toft Auto Racing's Wilmot 
Speedway; Lake Geneva 
Raceway; Great Lakes Dragway; 
Larry's Mobile Service; Mike 
Napicrala's Racing Photos; 
Midwest Racing News and 
Checkered Flag Racing News. 

Racing news: 

The Club-All Star Circuit of 
Champions will make two stops 
this season at the Wilmot 



Speedway. 

the all Stars will invade June 1 
for the 12th annual Wilmot Open 
Sprints and the national sanction 
Aug. 3. 

The racetrack is scheduled to 
open its 41st season oh Saturday, 
April 9 with sprints plus the sec-' 
ond round of the Wisconsin 
Modified Challenge Scries which 
was postponed from last fall. A 
third division, to be announced, 
will also be on the program. 

Wilmot Speedway will not be 
using the time trials for any of its 
divisions on regular race nights. A 
handicap system of average 
points for the past two nights 
completed will be used. Feature 
fields will still be determined by 
heat race and last chance qualifi- 
er races. 

Racing will begin at 6:45 p.m. 
with hot laps slated for 6 p.m. 

A sprint car challenge will be 
held at Wilmot each week. 

Wilmot promoter Ray Toft 
announced the agreement has 
been reached with Bienc 
Excavating of Roscllc to sponsor 
special sprint car challenge. 

The shootout will be a special 
10 -car, 10- lap race at the track to 
be held on a date yet to be an- 
nounced. 

For more information, con- 
tact Toft Auto Racing, Inc., P.O. 
Box 786, Antioch, 60002. 



ALECJUNGE 

Staff Reporter 

Mundelein unleashed the 
three-point arsenal to outgun 
Waukcgan in a regional final con- 
test. ,_„■;. ; 

The Mustangs canned an 
almost unheard of. 16 3-pointers. 
The final tally was 97-76. The out- 
come was misleading because 
the first half was an all-out scor- 
ing bananza as Mundelein took a 
50-42 edge into the lockeroom. 
Leading the frenzy was Kyle 
Kesscl who hit eight 3's and Sean 
Stackhouse who nailed 6 from 
beyond the 3- point line. 

"Kyle was just unconscious, 
and Stackhouse was uncon- 
scious," said a jubilant 
Mundelein coach Dennis Kessel, 
relishing a second straight 
regional title. 

"I hit a couple when they were 
in my face then they left me 
open," Kessel said. They starting 
leaving us open and we were not 



gun shy." 

In the opening minutes an 
aggressive and determined 
Waukcgan team took a 12-8 lead 
on a lay-up by Shannon King. A 
run of -3 pointers by Kessel and 
Gerald Coleman put Mundelein 
up 18-14 with 2:27 in the first 

The game was close through- 
out the second quarter with each 
team trading baskets with Kessel 
having a hot hand. Kessel racked 
up 7 3-pointers in the first half 
and 28 first-half points. 

At half coach Kesscl urged his 
team on. He knew teams have 
had a difficult time staying with 
the 26-1 team for four quarters. 
"Waukcgan played extremely 
well. We wanted to get the game 
back in the 90's. We played a 
great first half and we were only 
up by eight points." 

"We were giving up too many 
easy baskets. We came out in the 
second half and shut down the 
passing lanes," Kesscl said. 



Turnovers and the Inside 
presence of Brian McMahon 
helped propel the Mustangs to 
60-46 lead with 4:24 in the third 
quarter. 

Kessel credited McMahon 
with having key rebounds and a 
block to set the tone on the inside 
while his teammates were can- 
ning 3's. 

Leading the scoring brigade 
for Mundelein was Kesscl with 
38, Stackhouse with 22, and 
Gerald Coleman added 18. 
Waukcgan was lead by King with 
19. 

The younger Kesscl put the 
victory in perspective. Last year 
the Mustangs prevailed in a close 
win over Highland Park. This year 
the gap is wider. 

"We got a lift with the addi- 
tion of Stackhouse; Coleman has 
improved since last year. This 
team is a whole lot better. Teams 
haven't been able to stay with us 
for 32 minutes." 



Wildats win battle over Scouts for regional title 




Brian McMahon goes up for two surrounded by Waukegan 
defenders.— Photo by Gone Gabry 



KEVIN HANRAHAN 



Staff Reporter 

As if he were attaching an 
exclamation point to the end of a 
hard-fought game, Libcrtyville's 
Chad Lee finished the Wildcat 
scoring against rival Lake Forest 
with a slam dunk to cap a 66-60 
victory regional title. 

With the score 64-54 and 45 
seconds remaining, Lake Forest's 
Eric Santa put up an air ball from 
three-point range. The ball 
bounced around under the bas- 
ket until a pass reached an open 
Lee at half court. 

After that, it was show time. A 
wide open Lee, took the pass, 
dribbled the ball to the free throw 
line, where he took three more 
strides, and slammed the ball in. 
He even hung from the rim NBA 
style. 

The crowd exploded, knowing 
that was the clincher to enable 
LibertyvUle to advance to the 



semi-final round of the sectional 
against Zion-Benton. 

"When 1 saw his last three 
steps, then I knew he was crank- 
ing up for it," said Wildcat Coach 
Max Sanders on Lee's slam dunk. 

"If he would have missed it, 
he would have been dead," 
Sanders quipped.- 

"I saw it and just went for it," 
said Lee, who admitted .to prac- 
ticing it in practice all week. "I 
always wanted to do it in a game." 

"It felt good," the red-head 
junior said with a satisfying smile. 

Lee's slam put Ubertyville up 
by 10, but the game was close 
throughout the regional contest. 
It was also a game that 
LibertyvUle (19-8) had been gear- 
ing up for since they lost 74-72 to 
Lake Forest (14-13) in another 
hard-fought game Feb. 18 

Coach Sanders admitted that 
the team's attention to the Lake 



Forest game nearly cost them the 
opening regional game against 
Round Lake. 

"We just went over a scouting 
report," Sanders said. "We got 
lucky against Round Lake." 
LibertyvUle squeaked by Round 
Lake 59-56 in overtime. 

After the first three minutes of 
scoreless basketball, Lee also 
began with the game's first points 
as connected with a three-point 
jumper. Lake Forest and 
LibertyvUle exchanged baskets in 
the first quarter as it closed with 
the Wildcats leading 12-11. 

The second quarter was much 
of the same with Lake Forest not 
allowing LibertyvUle to take total 
control of the game. 

Matt Heldman assumed the 
leadership role in the third quar- 
ter, scoring 10 of his 26 points, 
but Lake Forest doubled teamed 
Heldman in the fourth. 



Lightning edged 
by Glenview, 5-3 

The Lindenhurst Lightning 
(under 12) indoor soccer team fell 
to the first place Glenview 
StaUions by the score of 5-3. 

The Lightning, now 4-4 on the 
season, play in the Gold Division 
at Soccer Enterprises in Highland 
Park. 

The Lindenhurst scoring 
came from Jon Mendelke, Matt 
Nolan and Quinn Gooch, with 
other offensive support from Jay 
Stuart, Keli Owens, Andy Lyon 
and Peter GedvUas. 

A 3-1 Glenview lead at half- 
time chaUenged the Lightning 
defense of Mark Sanderson, Clint 
Ludden, Josh Boiler, Ryan Hlinak 
and Kevin Nelson to hold the line 
against Glenview. 




***** 






doming soon to a 
store necrr* you ! 




*-ii"r *W»«t**r' 



»*- *«*.,• •»■ *• **•**# -*• ■"** * ** !• ■*• -— - *— * 




COMMUNITY UttflANd Newspapers M**ck 11, 1994 



' 



I 



Lake Villa to celebrate Irish spirit with parade 



[-Letter to t^e EcHtor 



ALECJUNGE 
Staff Reporter 

Time bi drawing near for the 
residents vo gather in Lake Villa to 
celebrate tho Irish spirit and 
enjoy a good-old fashioned 
parade to commemorate St, 
Patrick's Day. 

The festivities kick off at the 
Marshaling area at the Lake 
County Health Department at 
noon on March 12. The parade 
route will go from McKinnlcy 
Avenue to Kevin Avenue to 
Wesley Avenue to Waldcn Lane to 
Burnett Avenue to Sherwood 
Avenue to Grand Avenue to 
Cedar Avenue finishing at the 
Lake Villa Veterans of Foreign 
Wars (VFW) building. 

The Irish arc represented by 
Parade Marshall Maurice 
Hartnett, a former Irishman, his 
sister Betty King will be the co- 
Marshall and she will be followed 
with her husband, Jeff, and his 
brother, John, who will carry the 
Irish and American Flags. 

Hartnett was bom and raised 
In Limerick County in Ireland. 
Hartnett lived In Ireland for 20 
years and moved to America. He 



has lived In Lake Villa for 20 years. 
The Kings' also were born In 
Ireland. 

The parade is organized by 
the St. Patrick's Ummerick Club 
of Lake Villa and Is sponsored by 
the village of Lake Villa. 
Organizers arc excited about the 
slate of people participating in 
the parade and entertainment 
lined up. 

"If the weather Is good we're 
going to have a huge parade," 
said Terr! Wojclcchowski. "We 
think It's going to be great" 

Music will be provided, 
weather permitting, by the 20- 
plccc "Midlothian Scottish 
Bagpipe and Drum Band" and 
the "Dave Kelly Band." Also the 
McNaulty Irish Dancers will 
pcrfoOrm. 

About six antique farm trac- 
tors will be part of the parade and 
another three show cars Includ- 
ing the rare Cobra from Lyons 
and Ryan In Antioch. There will 
be at least one float. 

Some of the area dignitaries 
include Lake Villa Mayor Frank 
Loffredo, Miss Lake Villa, Little 
Miss Lake Villa, Miss 



Llndenhurst, Little Miss Lake 
County, Miss and Little Miss 
Vernon Hills, Miss and Utile Miss 
Llbertyvillc and Little Miss Long 
Grave. 

Groups and organizations 
Include the Community 
Outreach Uniting Residents 
Against Gang Environment 
(COURAGE), Boy Scouts, Cub 
Scouts, Lake Villa VFW, the 
Women's Auxiliary, Lake Villa 
Fire Department, Fox Lake Fire 
Department, First Fire Protection 
District of Antioch, Shamrock 
American Club and the Gym 
Dandles gymnastic club from 
the Round Lake Area Park 
District. 

Area businesses in the parade 
Include MCH Graphics, Avon 
Automotive, Herb's Towing, 
Victor Ford, Perry Printing and 
Tiemey Signs. 

The event will end with a 
corned beef and cabbage lun- 
cheon and entertainment at the 
Lake Villa VFW. The list of partic- 
ipants is likely to expand as the 
event nears. For more informa- 
tion, call Terri or Maurice at 356- 
1693. 



Geo-Karis agrees with budget 



Education, mental health, 
senior citizen services and wel- 
fare and Medicaid reform have 
high priority in the $31.5 billion 
budget Gov.' Jim Edgar has pro- 
posed for fiscal year 1995, accord- 
ing to state Sen. Adeline J. Geo- 
Karis (R-Zion). 

"This is a solid, no-fills bud- 
get that uses taxpayer dollars 
where they are most needed. The 
Governor is holding the line on 
taxes while increasing funding for 
important state services, such as 
education," Sen. Geo-Karis said. 
"I am pleased that $2.2 million is 
included to modify the North 
Point Marina's docking system at 
Illinois Beach State Park. This 
facility Is important to area boat 
owners and helps to bring visitors 
to our region." 

Sen. Geo-Karis said the bud- 
get contains additional $160 mil- 
lion for elementary and sec- 
ondary schools, confirming the 
state's commitment to providing 



quality schooling for all Illinois 
children. "Furthermore, there Is 
$86 million more for our state 
colleges and universities, along 
with $143 million for construc- 
tion and equipment at these 
institutions," she said. 

Sen. Geo-Karis noted that 
expansion of early childhood edu- 
cation will continue under the 
proposed budget, with a $12 mil- 
lion Increase. "This is one of the 
most effective programs we have, 
helping prepare children who arc 
at risk of failure so that they can 
learn in school," she said. 

The budget also focuses on 
welfare reform to help young 
mothers continue their education 
so that they can eventually sup- 
port their families, Sen. Geo-Karis 
said. "This has long been a goal of 
mine. The proposal would require 
teen mothers to stay in school 
until graduation, and nearly $13 
million would be provided for 
child care, transportation and 



other support for them," she said. 

Sen. Geo-Karis said the pro- 
posed budget contains an addi- 
tional $6 million to increase 
home care services for senior cit- 
izens, helping them to remain in 
their homes instead of being 
institutionalized. Funding for 
mental health will top $1 billion, 
resulting in improved staff-to- 
patient ratios at mental health 
and developmental centers and 
continuing the expansion of 
community programs. 

"The costly Medicaid pro- 
gram is also addressed in the 
budget," Sen. Geo-Karis said. 
"The goals are to assure that peo- 
ple have access to the right med- 
ical services at the right time, to 
redirect dollars toward primary 
and preventative care, to intro- 
duce competition to control costs 
and to create an affordable and 
predictable system so that we can 
eliminate the backlog in pay- 
ments to Medicaid providers." 



Marina owner wants voters to think twice 



TINA L. SWIECH 



Staff Reporter 

A Fox Lake marina owner is 
urging people to take a second 
look before voting on the water- 
way referendum. 

Hidden Cove president Ray 
Freeman said he was curious and 
phoned the agency one after- 
noon to have several questions 
answered, 

"How many boats does the 
agency have?" asked Freeman. 
"What can you account for state 
funding? What does your initial 
legislation say?" and "How much 
does one buoy cost?" 

Freeman talked with 
Executive Director Karen Kabbes, 
and he claims his questioned 
were only danced around. 

"1 went to her with those 
questions, and she said 'Ray, 
there is a volume of information 
you want You will get it faster If 
you go through the freedom of 
information act', "Freeman said. 
"I told her they only tell you to go 
through the freedom of informa- 
tion act if they won't give you the 
answers." 

However, last week, Kabbes 
did send a letter to Freeman, ask- 



ing him to dearly define his ques- 
tions to her, and she would be 
happy to answer them. 

The executive director also fur- 
nished Freeman with a name and 
address of the IDOT Department 
of Water Resources director, if 
there were any questions about 
funding, etc., Freeman explained. 

Freeman said he did some 
research on his own and found 
the Chain O* Lakes Fox River 
Waterway Management Agency 
to be the owner of eight boats. 
He' questioned the need when 
there are only 10 employees. 

Two of the vessels Freeman 
described as "luxury boats" that 
are used to haul legislators. The 
luxury boats turned out to be 
pontoon boats. Freeman said it 
wasn't really a big issue anyway. 

When asked if he was sore 
that the agency didn't purchase 
the boats from him, Freeman 
said, "No," and explained that 
they have bought older work- 
type boats from him in the past. 

Freeman charged again the 
agency is paying the Lake County 
Sheriffs Department $40,000 to 
look over the waters; and $28,000 
for the McHenry County Sheriffs 



Department. 

In the 1992 fiscal year end 
independent auditor's report, the 
sheriffs department contract 
says that Lake County provides 
for enforcement of the User Fee 
Ordinance, night speed limit 
ordinance, and flood control. 
This includes paying the marine 
radio operators. 

A similar contract was stated 
for McHenry County. 

"Ifs not their (the agency's) 
job to pay for safety on the 
Chain," said Freeman. "It was 
only meant that they could hire 
someone to enforce the sticker 
ordinance, and the waterway 
agency shouldn't be paying for 
safety. That's not their duty!" 
said Freeman. 

The marina owner said it 
makes him angry when the agency 
stresses that no one will be paying 
taxes on the agency to exist 

Each year, the waterway 
agency receives a $75,000 grant 
from the state conservation 
department "You can call it 
whatever you want, it's still com- 
ing out of your taxes," said 
Freeman. "A grant has to come 
from somewhere." 



Support students 

Editor 

I am very angry! As a parent of two Antioch Community 
High School students, I would like you to be aware of the 
"true" school situation. I have read the recent mailing from the 
D.E.S.T. advocate, Vern A. Holmes, and would like to put some 
facts out for you to consider before deciding the referendum 
Issue on March 15. 

In Mr. Holmes' mailing, he states to the reader, "Compare 
your eight hour work day to their (the ACHS teachers') five 
hour day." My children are In school from 7:50 a.m. to 3:05 
p.m., and that certainly Is more than five hours! I understand 
that teachers have lunch breaks and free periods but do they 
only work five hours a day? 

I phoned Mr. Holmes about that five hours. He stated that 
students are required by Springfield to receive five hours of 
teacher directed instruction. Next I asked him when teachers 
should prepare lessons, and correct student assignments since 
they work/teach directly with their students five hours a day, 
Mr. Vem answered "On their free time." I guess we taxpayers 
expect our employees, the ACHS teachers, to only work five 
hours a day and to do the other tasks for free, no compensa- 
tion. Now, consider if you, the voters, really work on your free 
time for free? You know the old saying, "You get what you pay 
for." 

Furthermore, teachers arc professionals who need special 
training and certification for their work with bur children. I 
want the best qualified teachers for my two children, and to be 
honest, ACHS published salaries are an embarrassment; we arc 
lucky these fine, dedicated, hard working teachers are still able 
to live on such average pay of $46,380. (This is B.E.S.T. figures 
which Include the principals, superintendents and counselors 
who do not directly teach our children). 
: But upon closer examination of this published salary table, 
there arc 5ft out of 108, or 53 percent of the staff who earn less 
than $46,000. When I looked carefully, I even noted 11 teachers 
make less than $29,000. Now of course there arc some taxpay- 
ers who say, well that sounds good to me, I cam less than that. 
But consider these teachers give the teenagers of our commu- 
nity the skills.to be successful as adults. Our high school Is the 
key that opens doors to the good life. We want out future 
adults to be financially secure and happy, to have the neces- 
sary skills to survive and be contributing members of society. 
And I agree with Mr. Holmes, "As parents, we have a responsi- 
bility to ensure our children arc well prepared for the chal- 
lenges for the 21st century. As taxpayers we have the right to 
expect our hard-camed tax dollars be spent wisely and achieve 
the best results possible." 

In our community, there is a wide range of incomes and I 
do not care for my taxes to Increase, but I disagree with sug- 
gesting that our teachers arc overpaid and work less than five 
hours a day for nine months a year. Let's stop comparing 
teachers to other jobs, and realize that our children deserve the 
best teachers possible and these teachers deserve a comfort- 
able secure income. 

Now, when I read in the Holmes letter that the average stu- 
dent ratio Is 16.7 per teacher, I'll let these facts about my son's 
sophomore class (the largest in ACHS of 496) be known: 
Spanish has 23; technical drawing 22; honors chemistry 19; 
honors geometry 28; and honors English 20 students. 

My son is also in symphonic band and there is only one 
director for the whole school. You tell me if ACHS is cutting 
back to basics? There arc over 1,700 students with one band 
director— no one else is teaching musical Instruments. And 
there is a strong correlation to an increase in math abilities 
and test scores with students who take band and can play a 
musical instrument Maybe ACHS budget trimming Is resulting 
in being "academically below average" as Vern Holmes sug- 
gested in his letter. 

1 will conclude with these facts regarding activity and cur- 
rlcuiar programs. My son and daughter are both In band and I 
paid $100 extra for that. 1 thank the dedicated parents who vol- 
unteer to help the one director set up the marching band In 
the foil and the upcoming Swing Street fund raiser. Also, there 
was the car raffle that raised money for the new band uniforms 
and I hope my children have a band in the future to wear them 
in. 

As for sports, there is a $100 fee per sport per student I paid 
for my son's golf and tennis, and my daughter's tennis and 
soccer. That's $400 so far this year and that is another way 
ACHS has cut expenses. I will pay so that both my children can 
have the best opportunities possible. 

By the way, has anyone looked at the cracks and grass grow- 
ing in those tennis courts lately? Maybe my children can just 
give up on tennis because the school cannot afford the courts. 
I'll accept that, but for some children sports is a real key to 
their success at high school and even future scholarships at 
college. What about the children whose parents cannot afford 
these fees? It is not easy for me, not to mention the increase in 
my real estate taxes. 

I am willing to pay the $13.56 monthly for the referendum I 
. encourage all you parents, taxpayers and voters to say yes this 
time. Thank you. 

Jacquelyn Ann Bonovltz 
Llndenhurst 



< *\ ij\~jptyjppaa*imB a *a q mew t aim uab!Kamni%* 



WWJJ — — — ■ ' • «■ 



MARch 11/1994 UkUNd Newspapcrs COMMUNITY. 



We want to keep the good things 

happening at ACH" 




We care about our communities and our kids 

and pledge to vote yes on March 1 5^ h for the 

Antioch Community High School Education Fund Referendum 



Bill Adams 
Susan S. Alberts 
Roger Jr. Aim 
T. Anderson 
Marcelo Andino 
Roger Andrews 
B rendu Awkerman 
Ted Axton 
Vicki Axton 
Kelly Baird 
James M Bardzinski 
J. Barker 
Bob Barry 
Thomas F. Bartusch 
Paul Baumunk 
Rochelle Bawelkiewicz 
Candi Becker 
Ted Becker 
Marc Berzin 
Wanda Berzin 
John & Charlene Bestler 
JonBetustok 
Jim Betustak 
Paul Biel 
AileenBiel 
Christina Biundo 
Keith Boordway 
Peggy Bogenschutz 
Dave Bogenschutz 
David R. Boodey 
Nicolette Boodey 
Steve Bonner 
Kathy Bosk 
Jay P.. Br at ton 
Rhonda M. Bradley 
Gloria Brda 
Richard A. Brown 
Kathleen A, Brown 
K. Buchta 
Larry Buchta 
Daniel Z. Burke 
Gary Burnett 
Nancy Byrne 
Wanda Campbell 
Clinton A. Campbell 
Capera 
James Carson 
B. Denice Carter 
Herb Case 
Lore Case 
Ron Chilcote 
Karen B. Chilcote 
Candice L. Chingo 
Laurie Christopherson 
Keith Christopherson 
Beth Cichon 
Kenneth F. Cichon 
Greg Collins 
Cheryl Cox 
Chris Cox 
Cathy Cralty 
Yvonne E. Cramond 
Terri Cruickshonk 
James M. Curtis 
Kay Custoff 
Kathy Cybil 
Cory Cybil 
Patricia Dalton 
Richard Dalton 



Laurel Dah! 

Steven P. Davik 

Karen Day 

Dennis DeBoer 

Judith K. peeve 

PhilDelany 

Theresa DeLeo 

Kevin Denzel 

Linda DeRue 

David DeRue 

Sharon Deustch 

Bruce Deutsch 

Bryan Dick v 

DebbyDiemer 

Adrienne Dietz 

C. Dobrowski 

Stephen Dohrmann 

Lynn Doolittle 

Tom Doolittle 

Dan & Joanne Dugenski 

Janet Drajesk 

Jeff Drajesk 

Dennis Dyer 

Anita Dyer 

Richard Eckenstahler 

Bob Eisen 

Sheila Eisen 

Portia Eng 

Carol English 

Deidre Erlenbom 

Mary Erlenborn 

Art Ersler 

Teri Estep 

Mike Fastbinder 

Karen Fastbinder 

Linda A. Fauser 

Harry P. Feldmann HI 

Constance M. Feltner 

Michael Feltner 

Helmut h Jr. Fendel 

Jim Fields 

Mike Fleming 

Wayne Foresta 

Caroline Forrest % 

Diane Franche 

George & Susan Freeman 

Michael J. Fuzz 

Mike.Gantar 

Timothy Garwood 

Denise Garwood 

Ellen Gauthier 

Chris D. Gauthier 

Kathleen S. Gillespie 

Jan Goblirsch 

Paul Gofron 

Lil Gofron 

Kris Gore 

Betsy Goughton 

Tim Grace 

Marilyn Grace 

Amy Graesser 

Linda Greenwood 

Garry E. Grinde 

Brenda Groleau 

David Groleau 

Marc Groth 

Susan Groth 

Mike Haas 



Sandra Haas 
Nicole Hucnchen 
Debru Hugenow 
James Haley 
Mrs. James Haley 
Dorlene Hall 
Joseph Hamm 
Martin J: Hanna 
Bcrnudette L. Hanna 
Pauline Hunnigan 
Robert Hansen 
Ellen Hansen 
Susan Hansen 
Sue Hanson 
John Hanson 
DeAnn Harris 
Paul Harvala 
Dennis Harvey 
Paula Harvey 
Karin Heilgcist 
Kathy Heilig 
Steve Hcnchcn 
Rich Heneberry 
Joyce Heneberry 
JimHintz 
Karol Hintz 
Julie Hoff 
Lynn Hoffman 
Joan Horan 
Paul Howard 
Diane Hughes 
Reggie Hughes ' 
Pat Ilgner 
Ellen Ipsen 
Gordon Jackson 
Lynne Jacobsen 
Phil Jacobsen 
Peter James 
Amy James 
John Jedele 
•Mary K. Jedele 
Chris Jenson 
Barbara Johnson 
Keith Johnson 
Richard Jordan 
Kimberly Jordan 
Mary Jouppi 
David Judson 
Marianne Judson 
Kathleen J. Kabel 
Kent Kumpendahl 
Kathleen Kane 
Ann Kakacek 
Trie i a Kapsalis 
Donna Katz 
Rosemarie Keating 
Madeline Kedric 
Thomas J. Keefe 
Monika Kepinski 
Debbie Kerr-Carpentcr 
Thomas R. Kessell 
Randy Kick 
Kevin Klas 
Theresa Kloster 
Michael Koenig' 
Brenda Koeslilng 
Richard Koesling 
Ursula Kokrtanse 




Diane Konruth 
Sue Koppu 
Martha Kuceyeski 
Randy Kuceyeski 
Peggy Kudingo 
Sue Kudingo 
Joyce Kufalk 
. Garry E. Kuhn 
Linda L Kuhn 
James Lancaster 
Barbara Larson 
Ray Landruin 
Derek Lang 
James M. Larson 
Daniel F. Lefler 
Christine Lefler 
Amy Leiber 
Jim Leinhardt 
TomLeppeh 
R.W. Lcseth 
Jim Lienhurdt 
Julie Lindholm 
Rosemary Lips 
Bea Lip ski 
Lawrence Loef 
John Logan 
Judy Logan 
Judi Logan 
Frank Lofredo 
Sharon Lorang 
Gregory P. Loui 
Larry Lubeck" 
Lynne Lubeck 
Phyllis A. Lucas 
Eugene R, Lucas 
Earla Ludden 
Karen Lueck 
James Lueck 
Kathy Lukeman 
Mary Lutgen 
Ken Lutgen 
Scott E. Malcolm 
Mary Beth Monro 
Sally A. Marshall 
J. Martz 
Tina Martz 
Linda Mason 
Tom McKinley 
Margie McKinley 
Sarah Mckoski 
Jan is McKoski 
Mary Kay McNeil 
Darline McRae 
Dan Mikal 
Beth Miles 
James Milhovilich 
Mr. Robert Miodonski 
Mrs. Robert Miodonski 
Ken Mortenson 
JeffMoxley 
KenNcasch 
JeAnine Nelson 
Richard Neubiser 
Dianne Neubiser 
Charon Neul 
Eric Newcomb . 
Earl Newton 
Pat Nielsen 



Ron Nielsen 
Floyd Nobler 
JoArin Nobler 
Karen Nolund 
TimNoonan 
Mary Noonun 
Tim Noonan III 
CarlNorlin 
Casey O'Connell 
Jounn O'Connell 
Jim O'Connell 
Kathryn Oddsen 
Condi Olscn 
Joyce Olsen 
Susan Olthum 
Tashu Osmond 
Joanne Osmond 
Glen Osmond 
Tim & JoAnn Osmond 
Debra Owens 
Steve Owens 
Mrs. James P. Deems 
Mr. James P. Deems 
Pat Pasiewicz 
Rosie Pasarclla 
Del Pechauer 
Laurie Pechauer 
Dorothy Pazanin 
Ronald Pazanin 
Ron & Terry Periman 
Diane Periman 
Mike Perrone 
Larry W. Peterson 
Paul L. Petty 
Dan Petroska 
Marge Piasecki 
Pam Pierson 
Don Pierson 
Paul Pirocunuc 
John G. Plonka 
William Porter 
Gail Porter 
Susan K. Prochnow 
Amy Reijoner 
Janet Reynolds 
Cheryl W. Ridge 
Ron Riepe 
Kathleen Riepe 
Glenda Rinehart 
Carolyn Robertson 
Rick Robertson 
Rewee Rockow 
Laura Rodgers 
Charlene Rodriguez 
Sue Ryan 

Roy Sackschewsky 
. Carol A. Sackschewsky 
Kathy Sanderson 
Allen Scherer 
Sue Schmidt 
Suzi Schmidt 
Debra L. Schultz 
Paula Schulz 
John Schulz 
Ryan Scoyoe 
Tom Shaunessey 
Michael Shechorn 
Donna Sheehom 



\ 



Lori Shilvock 
Marilyn Shlneflug 

Debbie Sigler 

Earnest Sigler 

Jennifer Sigler 

Linda Sigler 

Kris Silarski 

TedSilarski 

Donald E. Skidmore 

John Sladek 

Ceiia Sladek 
" Ann M.Smith 

Bill Smith 

Irene Smith 

Dcbbi Smith 

Kathy Smith 

Wayne A. Sobczak 

Kathleen Sparkman 

William Sparkman 

Kevin Spiegl 

Sandra. Stahl 

James Stout 

Mark D. Stracy 

Julie Suchecki 

Al Tamburrino 

Jennifer Tamburrino 

Carla Thompson 

Mark Thompson 

Robert Thompson 

Nigel Trainer 

SherrillJ.Tripp 

AnneTschanz 

Charles Tschunz 

LuAnn Ultes 

Kathleen Ultsch 

Pamela Vlies 

Glen Vlies 

Beth Vitt 

Kathleen M. Volling 

Russ Wade 

Jami Wade 

Fran Waible 

John Walker 

Vicki Walker 

Martin Ward 

Susan Ward 

Michael S. Ward 

Marion Weber 

William Weber 

Alice Wegener 

Mike Wegener 

Denise Wells 

Timothy Wells 

Susan Wells 

Bill White 

John Whitehurst 

Shorannc Whitmer 

Mary Wicklein 

Paul Wicklein 

Lillian Wisniewski 

Kenneth Wisniewski 

Gary Wittig 
. Mrs. Gary Wittig 

Michele Wolf 

Barbara F. Wolfgram 

Vincent A. Zalapi 

Paul Zeieri 

Don Zeman 

Linda Zeman 








Vote Yes March 15 



th 



Paid for by Citizens 
forACHS 
P.O. Box 409 • 
Antioch, IL 60002 
Hotline: 395-8991 




3 COMMUNITY LaIccIancJ Newspapers MarcIi 11, 1994 



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LAKE COUNTY BOARD 

DISTRICT #1 





* RISING PROPERTY TAXES: Judy Martini will help seniors on fixed incomes 
by lobbying to freeze their ever increasing tax assessments. Property tax increases could be paid after 
the homes are sold, not while our seniors are struggling to live in them. 



*-/ 1 



• FINANCIALLY STRAPPED SCHOOLS: Judy Martini will insist on 
consistent impact fees as part of sound pre-annexation agreements. Judy will make sure development 
pays for the impact it has on our overcrowded schools. 



• FLOODING: Judy Martini will help improve flood control by working for inter-governmental 
agreements to provide foster gates and more gaging stations on our waterways. Judy wants to control 
flooding that ruins homes not only here, but downriver also. 

• GRIDLOCK: Judy Martini will insist that future development of major work facilities be 
located near major roads & transit stations. Judy wants our existing roads improved first to handle 
increased traffic needs. 

• LOSS OF RURAL CHARACTER: Judy Martini will make sure proper 
planning is implemented so our area will not lose its identity & quality of life. Judy will fight to keep the 
character we all love in District #1 from being lost. 



• INDIFFERENT ELECTED OFFICIALS 

Judy Martini will never forget who she is representing and why 
she is in office. Judy will always remember that she is our 
representative first and that she must remain loyal to our wants 
and needs. 



. 



On Tuesday, March 15 
Take A Republican Ballot & Vote For 



JUDY 



the ONLY Candidate for LAKE COUNTY BOARD -, 
DISTRICT #1 who stands up for the People 

P«W for by friondaof Judy Martini • 
A copy of It* report »f*»d*fth»holLSt»to Board of EMctiont, Chicago, IHUw Laka County Cle*> Offtoa, Waukagan, IL 




• 




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. 




Voters faced with juvenile 




9?4 UkdANcI Newspapers 



MARY FOLEY 
Staff Reporter 

The question on the ballot 
this March will simply ask if the 
voter wishes to increase the 
extension limitation from 2.7 
percent to 0.7 percent. And, any- 
one on the street knows that 
property, owners do not want any 
more taxes. 

However, the purpose of this^ 
apparently simple question. is a 
little more complex and of critical 
importance to voters. At this time 
juveniles offenders arc being 
released from the current deten- 
tion facility in alarming numbers. 
They arc being released to make 
room for those who have com- 
mitted more serious crimes 



because the current facility has 
the capacity of only in beds. 

The money generated by this 
increase has been promised, by 
County Hoard resolution, to be 
used for the detention center. 
Despite the resolution, there has 
been some concern that a newly 
seated Lake County Board could 
not be bound by a prior board's 
resolution. 

While few dispute the need to 
expand the facility and staff, the 
funding mechanism has been 
attacked at informational meet- 
ings about the referendum.. 
According to the Illinois 
Municipal League (1ML) while 
the tax cap (5 percent or 
Consumer Price Index (GPI), 



whichever Is lower) will return 
the following levy year after the 
referendum, the aggregate base 
will be increased. . 

The following year, the tax 
cap Is applied to the new aggre- 
gate extension base, thereby per- 
mitting the tax increase to "spill" 
over into subsequent years. 
Taxpayers have also questioned 
why the new center cannot be 
funded by a bond issue, which 
would be self-limiting in dura- 
tion. The problem with a bond 
issue is that the bulk of the funds 
needed for the center arc operat- 
ing costs, not capital (building) 
expenses. 

Juvenile Judge Margaret 
Mullen has been making the 




rounds In an attempt to educate 
voters about the need for an 
expanded center and programs. 
Mullen tells how juveniles are 
being released from the current 
detention facility in alarming 
numbers to make room for those 
who have committed more scri; 
ous crimes because the current 
facility has the capacity of only 10 
beds. 

"We do not double bunk," 
explained Mullen. "When we arc 
three kids over, three kids have to 
go. I have to pick the ones to go. 
This week ! let a child go who 
stole a car while on home deten- 
tion." 

In January, the Lake County 
Police Chiefs Association 



i 



announced support of the refer- 
endum. John Hi Ward, president 
of the association, emphatically 
stated law enforcement's com- 
mitment to the referendum. 

A yes vote on the referendum^ 
would increase the. facility from 
an 10-bcd secure facility to a 36- 
bed facility, add an additional 
courtroom (from a single court- 
room to two courtrooms), addi- 
tional classroom and courtroom 
office space would bo added, as 
well as providing for day treat- 
ment, a Structured Military and 
Residential Treatment (SMART), 
and an expanded home deten- 
tion and intensive probation ser- 
vices. 
Sec JUVENILE page B9 





Newspapers 



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THISWEEK 

Editorial 

Lakeland Newspapers 
tells endorsements. 
RAGE&12 




Review 

"A Man for All Seasons" 
inspiring. RAGE B1 8 




Vocational Center stu- 
dents build home with 
help of tradesmen. 
RAGEB5 

Space travel 

Great America intro- 
duces new ride which 
simulaies space travel. 
PAGEB8 

St. Pat's treats 

Get ready for some Irish 
l PAGEB24 



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Laser surgery brings 
snoring relief. RAGE 
B27 




Sheriffs race heats 



MARY FOLEY 



Staff Reporter 

The fight for the Republican 
spot on the ballot for. Lake 
County Sheriff has turned into 
the battle of the press confer- 
ences. Incumbent Clinton 
Grinned called a press confer- 
ence two weeks ago accusing his . 
opposition, Ed Sindlcs of telling 
lies. Sindlcs held a rebuttal press 
conference and handed-out doc- 
umentation in support of his car : 
llcr statements. 

After the smoke clears, it 
becomes difficult to determine 
the issues, but Grinnell's stand 
seems to be that crime is down 
and he has more experience than 
Sindlcs. Sindlcs, on the other 
hand, keeps hammering on the 
organization problems within the 
department 

"Now is not the time for inex- 
perience," GrinneU told the audi- 
ence at an Antioch debate. "1 
believe strongly I am the best 
qualified. I am pleased to report 



that crime in Lake County has 
dropped 12 percent. I am very 
proud of this." 

"We need to go out and seek 
the problems not sit around and 
wait to hear about them," said 
Sindlcs at the same debate "I am 
asking you to tell me to take the 
sheriffs department into the '90s." . 

GrinneU, in his press confer- 
ence accused Sindles of tying. "I 
am going to challenge my oppo- 
nent's integrity. . He has beeii 
caught lying "and lylrig jo the 
press," said GrinneU. .-"He' lied 
about the offices he has held in 
the sheriffs department Just as 
he claimed credit for things he 
has never done on the transition 
team, he has also told the media 
that he had various titles and 
positions within the department. 
He never held any of those posi- 
tions." 

Sindlcs replied ' to these 
charges at his own press confer- 
ence. "My opponent stated I lied 
about the offices I held in the 




Voters to decide lifespan 
of Chain Waterway Agency 



TINA L. SWIECH 



Staff Reporter 

Since 1984, the Chain O' Lakes Fox River Waterway Management 
Agency has been cleaning and clearing up the waters for everyone's 
enjoyment and safety. 

Agency officials hope it continues. 

On March 15, voters will have the chance to help the agency con- 
tinue to operate. 

Nearly every village and organization in the voting district, in Lake 
and Mcllcnry counties, has agreed to support the agency. 

"Basically every municipality, has endorsed the agency," said Larry 
Lcafblad, county board member and campaign manager. All political 
and community organizations have said 'yes' to the agency. 

The last village to adopt the resolution was Spring Grove. Although 
residents of the town arc out of the voting district, the board agreed to 
pass the supporting document because of the good job the agency has 
been doing with the conservation department and fish hatchery locat- 
ed in Spring Grove, said Village Clerk Laura Bauer. • 

What wUI be on the ballots will be a "question" asking voters if they 
wish to sec the agency kept in operation, said Lcafblad. 

"Referendum" seems to be a dirty word, according to Lcafblad. 
When voters hear the word, they often get scared. "(People) might 
think their taxes arc going to be raised," said Lcafblad, who noted this 
is not the case. "There is no power to raise taxes," Lcafblad explained. 
The agency gets it's support from user fees, by selling boat stickers. 

Some of the accomplishments the agency has made over the past 
few years, include dredging and clearing of many lake channels, and 
the river including Algonquin and other areas in Mcllcnry County. 

To do yet more raking and dredging, a proposed maintenance plan 
for 1994-1995 has been composed. 

Residents in the townships of Antioch, Lake Villa, Grant, and a 
small portion of Cuba Township will be voting on the issue. 



Sheriffs department. As the 
attached memoranda show, the 
Sheriff himself has addressed me 
with a variety of titles including 
deputy superintendent, assistant 
jail superintendent, deputy 
superintendent of operations, 
.and deputy superintendent of the 
jail, " said Sindles. "If there is any 
confusion about my title, it 
comes from the Sheriff." 

Included in the press package 
distributed by Sindles was a copy 
of a letter written on official sta- 
tionery signed by f Clinton 
GrinneU, Sheriff, asking Judge 
Stephen Walter on behalf of 
Michael Kruckcnberg. 

Krucken berg was involved in an 
automobile accident in 
December of 1988 which killed 
two elderly people on Route 21 
south of Half Day Road. 
Kruckcnberg was convicted and 
received 36 months probation 
that included 12 months of a 
work release program as wcU as 
six months of intensive proba- 
tion. 

"It is not an uncommon thing 
to do," said Grinncll. "Right now, 
we have six other people in the 
work release program for the 



same crime. He has stayed out of 
trouble since then and is married 
and I think has children." 

Getting beyond all the 
charges, innuendo, and rhetoric, 
the candidates can reduce the 
election down to some simple 
issues. Both candidates were 
asked what they think the pivotal 
issues of the campaign are. 

"1 think that the focus issue; Is 
strictly who can better administer 
the Sheriffs department In the : 
next four year, 1 * said GrinneU. "I 

point to my 38 years' of law 
enforcement experience and my 
25 years of administrative experi- 
ence. I think that has prepared 
me to lead the department for- 
ward." 

"I think it is a total lack of 
leadership. Just to operate on a 
day-to-day basis is wrong," said 
Sindlcs. . "We need to sit down 
and make a 5- year plan, a 10-year 
plan. We need to have a plan 
with clearly defined goals, not 
address problems with the shot- 
gun effect. Right now there is a 
lack of direction. Once we have 
goals, we can deal with the prob- 
lems such as gangs, drugs, vio- 
lence, youth violence." 




See the snowball melt 

Firefighter Lou Lettenmayer," Louie Jr. and Marcus Miller 
throw snowballs at a Grayslake Fire Department burn- 
down— Photo by Bill Cawy 






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COUNTY UkdANtl Newspapers MarcN 1 1, 1 994 



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Sometimes A Picture is Worth A Thousand 




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For the 
9 murders committed 

in Lake County, 
13 people have 

been jailed, 
convicted or are 

awaiting trial. 



vote for Sheriff Clinton 







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Citizens to Re-Elect Sheriff Clint Grinnell, Marty Waitzman, Treasurer, 311 Washington Street, Waukegan, Illinois 60085. A copy of our report is 

available for Inspection at the Lake County Clerk's Office, 18 North County Street in Waukegan, Illinois 60085. 




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MarcIi 1 1, 1994 UcIancI NewspApests COUNTY,} 







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LaIce 
CouNiy 



Ravinia Woods plan wins OK 

GURNEE— dimee Village Board approved annex- 
ing *9 acres which will include a plan for 96 single- 
fdinily homes with a special service district. Ravinia 
Woods' third phase will be north of Washington St., 
cast of Rte. 45 in the Grand-Hunt area. Sundance 
Homes will develop the project with estimates of 
$200,000 in home values 

Itoo villages differ with county 

LAKE COUNTY— Round Lake Beach and 
Lindcnhurst didn't support Lake County's request to 
support an $8.9 million proposal on the March 15 bal- 
lot to improve the juvenile justice system. The plan 
calls for raising the tax rate from 2.7 percent to 6.7 per- 
cent to finance construction of an additional court- 
room, increase the number of beds and add office 
space. Round Lake Beach Village Board rejected the 
measure by a 4-1 vote and Lindcnhurst Village Board 
didn't second a motion supporting the referendum. 

Village plans St Pat's parade 

LAKE VILLA— The second annual St. Patrick's Day 
Parade is set to kick off on March 12 at noon The event 
features appearances by Congressman , Phil Crane and 
Ed Sindlcs, who is running in the Republican primary 
for Lake County Sheriff. Other special guests include 



the "Midlothian Scottish Bagpipe and Drum Band," 
"Dave Kelly Band" and McNulty Irish Dancers. There 
will be at least one float, six antique farm tractors and 
three show cars. Following the parade is a corned beef 
and cabbage dinner at the Veterans of Foreign Wars 
(VFWJHall. 

Police to hold auction 

FOX LAKE— The FoxLakc Police Department has 
announced a vehicle auction. A variety of cars, trucks 
and even a few boats will be auctioned off silently at 
the scaled-bid event. All concealed bids should be in to 
. Police Chief Jim Busch by 5 p.m. March 14. The drug- 
enforcement agency cars, confiscated cars and trucks, 
and two boats can be viewed at any time at the police 
station. The village has the right to refuse any bids. 
The bids will be opened March 15 at 9 a.m. 

Cambridge plans a no-go 

MUNDELEIN— Mundelein Village Board members 
turned thumbs down on a preliminary proposal intro- 
duced by executive vice president Jerry Conrad of 
Cambridge Homes for a mix of 550 single- family, duplex 
and "court" homes the developer wants to build on land 
near Winchester Rd.. Mayor Marilyn Slndles and the 
trustees were unanimous in their feeling that 
Mundelein needed more upscale homes on larger lots. 

Sewer services extended 

BARRINGTON— Village officials have approved 
the extension of water and sewer services to additional 
areas in the Village of Inverness. Harrington already 
supplies services to some spots in the village, and will 
now extend them to the' Sanctuary of Inverness, pro- 
posed to be built cast of Harrington Road and south of 
Bradwcll Road, and the proposed Glcncrcst III subdi- 
vision, to be built cast of Barrlngton and Dundee 
- roads. Barrlngton trustees approved the extension "in 
principle," provided the necessary improvements to 
the village system are paid for by cither the Village of 
Inverness or by the land developers involved. . 
Inverness was scheduled to annex the Sanctuary prop- 
erty from unincorporated Cook County at its March 8 
board meeting. 



Dry hydrants stalled 

KJLDEER— A village bid to install two dry 
hydrants has been stymied by pending litigation and a 
reluctance among residents to put them on or near 
their property. Kildccr officials were told several years 
ago they would have three additional hydrants 
installed over so many years, but have not received 
even one, let alone the two the Lake Zurich Rural Fire 
Protection District is pursuing. John Willcms, a district 
trustee and Kildccr resident, said he has been working 
on getting the hydrants installed for the benefit of 
Klldeer residents, but has had little progress within the 
last year. Village officials were going to see what they 
could do to expedite the matter. 

Salvi seeks votes for Crane 

WAUCONDA^Evcn though State Rep. Al Salvi (R- 
Dlst. 52) Is running unopposed in both the Republican 
and Democratic primaries, he is still actively cam- 
paigning. He said he wants to let people know he has 
been working for them as a freshman representative 
and will continue to do so in his second term. "1 want 
to keep a presence out there," he said. "That is very 
important" Salvi is also endorsing U.S. Rep. Philip M. 
Crane (R-Dist 8) for reelection, and is actively cam- 
paigning for him. Salvi will hold a fund-raiser for Crane 
at his home, 24558 W. Lake Fairfield Lane on March 1 1 
from 6 to 7 p.m. Tickets for the event cost $50, with 
Crane scheduled to make an appearance. 

Fire districts likely to settle 

LAKE VILLA TOWNSHIP— Lake Villa Fire 
Protection District and Round Lake Fire Protection 
Districts are close to settling a legal battle over territory 
in Round Lake Beach and Round Lake Heights, which 
are both in Lake Villa Township. Round Lake Fire 
District will service the area while Lake Villa Fire 
District continues to collect taxes from existing resi- 
dents. Taxes on new development will be collected by 
Round Lake Fire District with the remaining assess- 
ments going to Round Lake after nine years. The two 
are likely to make the settlement final in court on 
Thursday. 




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When you're serious about saving money, call 
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Conventional loans as well as second mortgages also available. 



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Learn How To Transfer Your 

Estate To Your Family Quickly 

And Without Probate Fees 



ATTEND ONE OF THESE SEMINARS: 



Waukegan-Ramada Inn 
Wednesday, March 23 



where: Gumee-Hampton Inn 
when: Wednesday, March 16 

1:00 p.m. or 6:00 p.m. 
Door Prizes - Call 223-9200 Now 




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When you consider the cost of a will and the fees involved in probate, as 
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A FIRM YOU CAN TRUST. Polster and Associates has prepared 
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disadvantages of wills and holding property in joint tenancy. You'll learn 
about the advantages of living trusts and how they work. You'll be informed 
so that you can make the best decisions for your family. Seating is limited, 
call (708) 223-9200. Do your friends a favor and invite them to join you. 



$ 



\ 



, fj| COUNTY UlcElANd Newspapers M»«ch 11 , 1994 | _ . - ' 

County to help feed hungry Letters to t^e Edhoii 



Judging by the enthusiasm of 
those planning the Seventh 
Annual "AH Lake County Food 
Drive," it promises to be the most 
successful food drive held to date 
in Lake County. Over 90 schools, 
125 churches, 25 major business- 
es, numerous county groups, 
plus hundreds of volunteers arc 
working together to collect food 
for the hungry of Lake County. 

During the week of March 12 
through 19, the Lake County 
Food Resource Council, the 
Northeast Council, Boy Scouts of 
America, Radio Station 
WKRS/WXLC and the Lake 
County Life Underwriters 
Association will be assisted by 
employees * of 25 major Lake 
County corporations and busi- 
nesses in collecting food to 
replenish the shelves in 26 
County soup kitchens and food 
pantries. Food will also be col- 
lected at most county public 
libraries and fire stations. 

Alt food collected will stay in 
Lake County and will immediate- 
ly be donated to panties and soup 
kitchens requesting food. Those 
agencies requesting assistance 
from this year's drive include: All 
Nations Church Pantry, 
Waukegan; Catholic Charities; 
Community Help, Round Lake; 
COOL Pantry, Waukegan; 



Ebenczcr Baptist Church, Zion; 
Emmanual United Methodist 
Church, North Chicago; Glenn 
Flora Pantry, Waukegan. 

Grace Missionary Church 
Food Pantry, Zion; Greater Faith 
Church Food Pantry, Waukegan; 
Lake Zurich Community Church 
Pantry; Independence Center, 
Waukegan; Lake County 
Conncctlon/PADS; Lake Villa 
Township Pantry; Libertyvlllc 
Township Pantry; Millburn 
Congregational Church Pantry, 
Lake Villa; Mundclcin Self Help, 
Mundelcin; Our Lady of Humility 
Church Food Pantry, Beach Park; 
New Life Christian Church 
Pantry, Waukegan. 

Shiloh Baptist Church Soup 
Kitchen, Waukegan; St. Bart's 
Food Pantry and soup Kitchen, 
Waukegan; St. Francis DcSalcs 
Food Pantry, Lake Zurich; St. 
Joseph's Social Service, 
Waukegan; The Sign of the Dove 
Church Pantry, Waukegan; 
Wildwood Presbyterian Church 
Pantry, Wildwood and 

Zion/Bcnton Food Pantry, Zion. 

Companies that arc partici- 
pating in this ambitious effort to , 
help feed the hungry by collect- 
ing food or donating funds arc; 
Abbott Laboratories, Abbott Park; 
Allstate Insurance Corp., 
Bannockbum; Bank of Northern 
Illinois NA, Gurnce; Baxter 



Healthcare, Dcerficld, North 
Chicago and Round ' Lake; 
Brunswick Corporation, Lake 
Forest; Cherry Electric, 
Waukegan; Clark, Boardman, 
Callaghan & Co., Dcerficld; 
Hewitt Associates, Lincolnshire. 

Holllstcr Inc., Libertyvlllc; 
Household International, 

Prospect Heights; Lake County 
Farm Bureau, Grayslakc; Lamb's 
Farm Country Inn Restaurant, 
Llbcrtyvillc; Land and Lakes 
Company, Park Ridge; Lcica 
Professional Equipment 

Company, Dcerficld; MDA 
Scientific Inc., Lincolnshire; 
Motorola Inc., Libcrtyville; 
Nutraswcct Company, Dcerficld; 
OMC Inc., Waukegan. 

Quill Corp., Lincolnshire; 
RustOlcum Corp., Vernon Hills; 
USG Corp. Research Center, 
Llbcrtyvillc; Vance Publishing 
Corp., Lincolnshire; Wclton's 
Village Markets, Gurnce and 
Round Lake; Weyerhaeuser 
Company, Chicago and WMX 
Technologies, Oak Brook. In 
addition, the Waukegan Jaycecs 
and the Lake Count Life 
Underwriters Association will be 
assisting the Boy, Scouts with 
transportation of the food to the 
central sorting point in Rondout. 

For more information, call 
Dave Ellis at 945-6170. 



Pet of ThE WEEk- — 

Ready for home of his own 




Spike 



Spike is a big fellow with a beautifully 
marked coat. Under 11/2 years old, he's for 
someone who likes generously sized cats 
with terrific personalities! Spike was born 
to a stray mom and is ready for a home of 
his own. . 

For information on how to adopt 
Spike or any of the dogs and cats at the 
Assist shelter call (815)455-9411. Adoption 
fees include spay/neuter, shots, and testing 
for FliLV, F1P, and 1W. 

The Assisi Animal Foundation will be 
holding their second annual fashion show 
and luncheon on Saturday, March 26 at the 
Crystal Lake County Club. For further 
details call (815)455-9411. 



Benjamin offers plenty of love 



Benjamin Underfoot earned his named 
because he adores human attention. Perfect for 
someone who prefers an older pet to provide lots 
of quiet companionship. Not a youngster, he still 
has plenty of love to give. 

For information on how to adopt Benjamin 
or any of the dogs and cats at the Assisi shelter 
call (815)455-9411. Adoption fees include 
spay/neuter, shots and tests. 

Volunteers arc needed at the Assisi shelter, to 
find out more called (815)455-941 1. 




Benjamin Underfoot 



Forest Stewardship Conference set for March 12 



- Ensuring a living forest legacy 
for future generations through 
better forest management is the 
goal of the Midwest Forest 
Stewardship Conference set for 
Saturday, March 12, at McHenry 
County College Conference 
Center in Crystal Lake. 

The conference, sponsored by 
the Cooperative Extension Ser- 
vice at the University of Illinois, 
Michigan State University, the 
University of Wisconsin and 



Purdue University, plus the Illi- 
nois Department of Conserva- 
tion-Division of Forest Resources 
and the forestry divisions within 
the Departments of Natural 
Resources in Indiana, Michigan 
and Wisconsin, will be held from 
8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

Keynote speakers for the con- 
ference include Stuart Pcquignot, 
state forester, Illinois Dept. of 
Conservation; Craig Locey, U.S. 
Forest Service; State & Private 
Forestry, St. Paul, Minn.; and 



Keith Argow, executive director of 
the National Woodland Owners 
Assn., Vienna, Va. 

Advanced registration is re- 
quired. Registration fee for single 
participants is $20, with $35 
required for two family members 
attending. Additional family 
members may register for $15 per 
person. No -walk-in registration 
on the (Jay of the conference will 
^ be^Kfceptcd. 

To register, call (217)333-2771. 



Gridlock in Paradise 

Editor 

Act I: Chicago resident scanning real estate newspaper ads reads 
about "the Cambridge Classics: 40.1urnishcd models within a ten mile 
drive!" Large full-color drawing shows beautiful Lake County: blue 
lakes, huge trees, people sailing, riding horses, golfing and flying kites; 
very few houses, one mall, only two cars cruising past vast green open 
spaces on the wide, empty highways of this rural paradise... 

Act II: Lake County resident sits five cars back In drive of new sub- 
division, waiting to turn left onto bumpcr-to-bumpcr, smog-choked 
Rtc. 83. The "lake" to his right is an excavated detention pond ringed 
with stone and green scum; to his left stands a locust tree that has 
grown fast since it was stuck in the ground four years ago but just lost 
its biggest branch to a winter ice storm. Not a kite flier, horse-back 
rider, or sailboat in sight... 

Act III: Exhausted resident at home that night reads Lakeland's 
interview with Martin Paulson, candidate for Lake County Board from 
District 15, who is desperately trying to make people believe that his 
opponent, incumbent Carol Calabrcsa, is a "single issue 1 * candidate 
because of "her role as an anti-development leader." Paulson, recruit- 
ed and backed by the Jack Martin gung-ho-dcvclopmcnt faction of the 
Republican party, "laughs when questioned about charges that he Is a 
stooge for the powerful County Board chairman, Robert Depke." 
Resident folds his paper, sighs and heads for bed to prepare for anoth- 
er morning's gridlock In paradise:.. 

Epilogue: On election day, our hero joins other over-taxed^. over- 
gridlockcd Lake Countians in choosing which of the many candidates 
on the ballot for County Board will help decide their fate over the next 
four years. 

In virtually every district, they can choose someone who will gladly 
vote more unbridled development— like Martin Paulson, the Dcpke- 
appointed head fox in the Health Dept. 's chicken coop; the man Depke 
introduced at his Christmas party as his pick to get "that woman" off 
the Board. 

Or they can choose someone from the quality of life group— like 
"that woman" Carol Calabrcsa, a single issue candidate only if you con- 
sider such things as opposition to' soaring taxes brought on by overde- 
velopment, jam-packed roads and schools, loss of quality of life and 
natural landscape, etc., a "single issue." 

Our hero goes into the voting booth and closes the curtain... 

Martha A, Marks 
Rlverwoods 

Money not answer 

Editor. 

This is an open letter to all of the parents of school age children who 
have been convinced by Lake County teachers and school administra- 
tors to push for "quality education." Additional money, in this area, Is 
like pouring water down a dry well— the hole cannot be Filled and the 
educators cannot be sated in their greed for money. School boards and 
administrators must accept fiscal responsibility for what they have 
before they dare ask for more. 

The evidence is there. Money is not the answer. Today's students 
demonstrate a lack of respect for themselves and their elders, as well as 
lacking a desire for an education. "Quality education." begins in the 
home. Parents need to teach their children respect, courtesy, manners, 
morals, and instill in them the desire to learn. The school administra- 
tion needs to teach fundamental education and demand a suitable 
dress code. It is demoralizing to witness today's youth attending school 
dressed like hookers and rockers. 

Paying for education is another matter. Parents with children of 
school age should be required to pay, per child, rather than letting the 
burden fall on society, with ever-skyrocketing raxes.' If this were the 
case I'm sure our education system would improve very quickly. There 
is just so much that the average household budget can with-stand, and 
those on fixed-incomes (who arc still expected to pay for a school sys- 
tem which their own children have been out of for 20 or more years) 
cannot tolerate the increased burden. 

Blame must also fall upon die shoulders of the village governments. 
In their greed to accept ever-increasing development, they lost sight of 
the fact that greater population growth meant more services — schools, 
police and Fire protection, water, sewage disposal and the inevitable 
flooding that comes with the lack of natural and proper drainage. Once 
the public mandates a stop to this hysterical race, and common sense 
prevails, we will no longer be brain-washed into tliinking "more money 
means better!" Vote no for your educational referendum! 

Jane Farwcll 
Grayslakc 

Supports Skoien 

Editor 

In the Eighth Congressional District Gary Skoien single-handedly 
worked to expose Phil Crane to the voters for the free-riding legislator 
he is. Skoien marginally missed unseating him two years ago. It does- 
n't take much time and effort to vote no all of the time. Little time and 
research is needed and can be effectively used in ensuing campaigns 
, for some time. A "No" man like Crane can be worse than a "Yes" man. 

Now that Peter Fitzgerald is aware of Crane's vulnerability, he is 
homing in on Skoicn's legwork with a capitalistic approach to cam- 
paigning. 

It's obvious that Gary Skoien is the concerned candidate, willing to 
work hard to bring a good agenda to Washington and in my judgment 
will not be afraid to vote for the good of Congressional District Eight 

Raymond L Lacroix 
Grayslakc 




i 






i'j i I 



V-i 



M*nch 11, 1994 UkelANd Newspapers COUNTY 



Vocational center trades group 





Receives award 

Robert Stretcher, left, receives 
an award Jor 15 years of ser- 
vice to. Lake County Building 
Trades Advisory Group. 
Presenting the award Is Wayne 
Chtrchirlllo, chairman. Building 
trades group advises Lake 
County Area Vocational 
Center students and staff in 
building homes. — Photo by 
GoneGabry. 



At first glance, one would not 
think that a home in the 
Meadows subdivision of 
Grayslakc was built by high 
school students. 

The two-story structure fits 
right into the landscape of the 
subdivision off Washington 
Street. And that is the whole idea 
behind the building trades pro- 
gram at the Lake County. Area 
.Vocational Center. 

The group of professionals 
which advises the LCAVC staff 
and students honored a long- 
time backer for 15 years of ser- 
vice. Robert Stretcher, head of 
Lake County Building and Zoning ' 
Depts., was presented with an 
award. Wayne Chirchirillo, chair- 
man of the advisory group, gave 
the honor. 

"The group Is comprised of all 
the disciplines in the building 
trades industry," Rich Dijulio 



DUI driver could get 10 
years in double fatality 



ALEC JUNGE 



Staff Reporter 

A Gurnce man pled guilty to 
two counts of reckless homicide 
in an accident where he was 
legally intoxicated when he 
crashed into the victims. 

Benjamin Tilton, 36, of 
Gurnce,, plead guilty to the 
charges in exchange for lowering 
the maximum sentence from 14 
to 10 years. The charges come as 
a result of an accident on Nov. 6 
at Washington, Street^ 

,Giorgiann "Ccrcse, assistant 
state's attorney, will seek the 10- 
year sentence. "I'm going to be 
asking for the maximum sen- 
tence." 

tilton has had a history of 
drunk driving; Ccrese said he had 
two prior instances where he was 
given court supervision. 

The maximum Tilton could 
have faced is 14 years. Tilton 
could receive almost any sen- 
tence from probation to 10 years. 

The accident killed Wilma 
Turner, 68, of Round Lake, and 
Lupc Albright, 69, of Lake Villa. 



Both held prominent roles in 
Calvary Presbyterian Church in 
Round Lake. 

• Turner was a church elder, 
responsible for trie financial 
records and bookkeeping of the 
church. She was a former village 
clerk in Round Lake Park and was 
retired from the Round Lake Area 
Park. District as a financial secre- 
tary. 

Albright sang lead soprano in 
the church choir. She was an 
alternate to. the Women's 
Prcsbyterial and a founding 
member of the congregation. 

Turner was killed about "nine 
hours after the accident. Albright 
died nine days after the accident 
of head wounds. 

Tilton had a blood alcohol read- 
ing of .23 in a blood sample fol- 
lowing the accident He also test- 
ed .19 at the Gurnce Police sta- 
tion 3 1/2 hours after the fatality, 
according to Ceresc. 

Tilton is out on a $200,000 
bond pending the sentencing 
date. 



Nursery school holds open house 



AAUW Nursery School, 2500 
Northern Ave., Waukcgan, is 
holding an open house on Sun- 
day, March 13, from 1 to 4 p.m. to 
introduce parents and prospec- 
tive students to the school's fall 
programs for children ages two 
through five. 

Teachers and members of the 
board of directors will be on hand 
to answer questions, explain the 



Fish Boil 
Every Friday 

Served 5:00-9:00 p.m. 



school's philosophy, and show 
the facil ities. Registration 
will be acccpcd for the fall pro- 
grams. Classes arc offered for 3- 
and 4-year-old children, along 
with a young fives class for chil- 
dren who miss the kindergarten 
age deadline. A Tender Twos 
class for 2-and 3-year-old chil- 
dren and their parents is also 
offered Fridays and Saturdays. 
For information, call 623-0550. 




•Soup 

►Salad Bar . 

•3 Varieties of Fish Plus One Special Entree 

•Fresh Rye & Cinnamon Rolls 



Only 



All You Can Eat 



niMER €01 ATRV CI IB 

5419 Kenosha St ?l -j ;& ici „ ,a< >; 
(815)6782631 Richmond. IL 



said of the advisory board. "It is a 
cross section of the construction 
industry." 

The group helps in the design, 
land acquisition and provides 
support. 

Students who have built the 
homes, which include some 
across the street at Mariner's 
Cove, have been hired as interns 
or benefited from networking. 

"It is a two-story house which 
is light, bright and open. It is. 
2,800-squarc feet; it is not a small 
house and it is far from your 
mind when you think high school 
students built it," Dijulio said. 

The home has a full base- 
ment. 




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^Jew home 

This Is the view of the home being constructed by Lake County 
Area Vocational Center students. The two : story structure is locat- 
ed In the Grayslake Meadows subdivision, off Washington Street 
and west of Rte. 45. — Photo by Gen© Gabry. 




As 






vA 



.ooking over plans 

Rich DUullo and Wayne Chirchirillo of the Lake County Building Trades Advisory Group look over plans 
for a new house .wlttvRobert Stretcher; Lake County ^Director of Building and Zoning. Lake - County J 
Area Vocational Center students are building the home at Grayslake Meadows subdivision. — Photo 
by Gene Gabry. 



Lake County's Judge 
For 18 Years a 



■«» 



JUDGE CHARLES F. 




*£&■- 



• Again, "HIGHLY 
RECOMMENDED," 

for Appellate Judge 
by the Illinois 
State Bar Association 

• Unanimously 
endorsed by the 
Lake County 
Republican Central 
Committee 

Republican for Illinois 
Appellate Court, 2nd District 

lu ^ (Philip G. Reinhard vacancy) 

REPUBLICAN MARCH 15th 

huh ;... 






■< ? 







COUNTY LaI<eIancI Newspapers M*nch 11, 1994 



Pet 



■ 

PfiRfiDE 




Several helpful tips to get through puppy training 



Cute, furry ball of massive energy. 
Their bodies are In your house but, their 
brains are In the Bahamasl 

Don't be fooled. They will try to get 
away with everything they can. Those 
eyes will try to tell you ,"l don't need 
direction, I Just need to playl" 

Here are a few helpful tips to get 
you through some difficult times before 
you enroll In a puppy 
obedience/socialization class. Puppies 
should be enrolled as soon as possible 
In a class to curtail any bad manners 
before they start. 



Put your puppy on a food 

schedule, 

•Feed three times a day until the 
puppy reaches six months. 

• Feed at the same time every day. 

•Only allow 15 to 20 minutes for the 
puppy to eat. 

•Raise your water and feed bowl 
off the floor. 
■ • Feed a food high In animal protein. 

•Do not leave food or water In the 
puppy's crate all day while you are 
gone— what goes In, must come.outl 

Start potty training immediately 

•Take the puppy outside to 
eliminate 20 minutes after eating. 



•Do not use paper In the crate or on 
the floor. 

•The puppy at this point can not 
"hold" so take 'time out as often as 
possible. 

Crato train 

•Make the crate a "happy place." 

• Use a treat to encourage the 
puppy to go Into the crate. 

•Never punish your puppy In Ihe 
crate. The crate admittedly is riot a 
"thing of beauty" but It can be forgiven 
for not being a welcome addition to 
the household decor as It proves how 



much It can help the dog to remain a 
welcome addition to the household. 

Hoalth 

• Rnd a vet you and your puppy will 
be comfortable with. 

•Have the vets phone number 
handy at all times. 

If, you have any questions about 
behavior, don't be afraid to, ask. 
Remember, no question Is stupid, 
someone probably asked the same 
thing before.-by CATHIE SABIN, B.C. 
Dog Training, Grooming and Pot 
Supply. 



GraysLake Animal Hospital 

Practice limited to small animals 
Dr. Kenneth' Poole 
Dr. Mark Lotspelch 
Dr. David Jackson 
Dr. Susan Sallee 
Dr. Lori Blackwell 
Dr. Julie Hall' • 
(708)223-8612 









"MO*, 



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Akita 

Pomeranian 
Lhasa Apso 
Keeshond 
Am. Eskimo 



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Schnauzer 

Fox Terrier 

Basset 

Dachshund 

Some Mixed Breeds 



CANINE CLIPPERS 
& PET SUPPLIES 

250 Center Street 

Gray slake, I L 60030 

(708)223-5444 

NEW SHIPMENT OF 
HERMIT CRABS HERE NOW!. 

/ out our new finches 

We cany feeder rats, mice & crickets' 



L — _ _ _ SSEteli®!^ JS22-22. 



B.C. Dog Training 

Grooming And Pet Supply 




•Grooming 

•Puppy and Adult Day Care 

•Premium Dog and Cat Foods 6 AM - 6PM 

•Dog & Cat Supplies 



•Obedience 
•Conformation 



•Agility 
•Hyball 



SPECIAL APRIL 9, 1994 

Canine Good Citizen Test 

and Tattoo Clinic 11 am - 5 pm 

. Call For Reservations 

BETTER CANINES 

"Where We Teach You To Train 

And Care For Your Dog" 

872 Tower Road Mundelein 

(708)566-1960 



I HELPED SAVE A SMALL LIFE TODAYI 

The Assist Animal Foundation 

ONE CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE... 

TOGETHER WE'LL MAKE A MIRACLE 

GIFTS ARE TAX DEDUCTIBLE 
NOT FOR PROFIT... VOLUNTEER 




Wa don't destroy hometMaanlmatal They live their 
full lives uncaged If not adopted. We apay and 
neuter, conduct a dynamic pet vieltatJon/therapy 



heir program for the elderly, provide education programs 
and for young people and otter a special "pet retirement" 
any program. THANK YOU FOR YOUR HELPI 



Name. 



Address _ 
City,ST_ 
Zip Code 



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Individual ■ 
Membership $15 

Family Membership ' 

$20 s 

Donation & ■ 



Please mall to: Asslsl Animal Foundation 
P.O.B. 143 Crystal Lake, IL 60014 (815)455-9411 



T!5^n ,i 






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MaicIi 11, 1994 UkElANd Newspapers "COUNTY 




Habitat Home applicant meeting slated 




Habitat for Humanity Lake 
County will hold an information- 
al meeting for families interested 
in applying for Habitat houses to 
be built in Waukegan, North 
Chicago, Zion and Round Lake. 

The meeting will be on 
Saturday, March 12, at 10 a.m., at - 
the Round Lake Park District, 81 6 
Hart Rd,, In Round Lake. Call 623- 
1020 for directions. 



Families interested in apply- 
ing for a Habitat house must 
attend this meeting in order to 
receive an application for hous- 
ing. 

Applicants must meet Habitat 
criteria. Their current housing 
must be inadequate, dangerous 
or overcrowded. The family must 
earn - between $15,000 and 
$25,000 a . year. The applicant 



must be willing to become a part-., 
ner and work for 500 hours build- 
ing their own -home and the. 
homes of others. 

Applicants attending the 
informational meeting will be 
considered for homes scheduled 
to be built n Waukegan, North 
Chicago and Round Lake in 1994. 

For information, contact the 
Habitat office at 623-1020. 



Coroner Barbara Richardson endorsed Ed Slndlesfor Lake County 
Sheriff. 

Both sides in Sheriff's race 
gain many endorsements 



Both candidates in the Lake 
County Sheriffs race have a , 
number of endorsements. Here 
Is a list of just some of the 
endorsements. 

For incumbent Sheriff 
Grinnell, State Senator Adeline 
Geo-Karis, State Senator William 
Peterson, State Representative 
Robert Chuchill, . State 
Representative Verna Clayton, 
State Representative Andrea 
Moore, Lake County State's 
Attorney Michael Waller, Lake 
County Court Clerk Sally Coffelt, 
Lake County Treasurer Jack 
"Red" Anderson, Lake County 
Recorder of Deeds Frank Nustra, 
Lake County Superintendent of 
Schools Edward Gonwa, 
Lakeland Newspapers and for- 



mer U.S. Attorney for the 
Northern District Fred Forman. 

Endorsers of Ed Slndles 
include the Lake County Sheriffs 
Fraternal Order of Police, the 
Waukegan Fraternal Order of 
Police, the Libertyville Fraternal 
Order of Police, the Round Lake 
Fraternal Order of Police, United 
Hellenic Voters of America, the 
Waukegan Township Republican 
Organization, Cuba Township 
Republican Organization, Grant 
Township. Republican 

Organization, Fremont Township 
Republican Organization, Pioneer 
Press/Daily Herald, Lake County 
Coroner Barbara . Richardson, 
Waukegan Township Chairman 
Jack Diamond, and Vcm Thclcn 
of Thelen Sand and Gravel. 




Opening 

The Lake County Famly YMCA has moved Its child care program offslte to provide more room for 
Its new Nautilus/Aerobic Center. The Center now consists of five StairMasters, four Alrdynes, two 
Ufecycles. two Concept II rowers, 14 pieces of Nauriluys equipment and 1.400 pounds of dumb- 
bells. Oh hand for the dedication were (left to right) James Maurice, chairman of 1he board, Alison 
Huntley, full time director, Bob Nemanlch, board member, Anna Nemanlch, Jay Drobnlck. board 
member, and Phil Baaske, president of the Lake County YMCA. —Photo by BUI Dermody Jr. 




NORTH SHORE 
CAT CLUB 

Presents Its . 
43rd Annual All Breed 

CAT SHOW 

Over 200 cats • many 
different breeds 

Mundelein 

■ 

Holiday Inn 

Rt. 83 Between Rts. 60 & 45 

April 2nd & 3rd, 1994 

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I COUNTY UkclANcI Newspapers M*itch 11,1994 



Six Flags new attraction will mirror Space Shuttle 



STEVE PETERSON , 

Staff Reporter 

Six Flags Great America will have a new 
attraction when it opens in April, one 
dedicated to the explorer in alt of us. 

Six Flags announced its new attraction 
of a simulated space shuttle, the park's 
first motion simulator ride. 

"Wc arc hoping it appeals to all ages," 
Connie Costello, Six Flags spokesperson, 
said. 

Ground was broken for the attraction 
last summer. It will be located where the 



Happy St. 



former grandstand was housed. 

The theme will last about 20 minutes 
with the actual simulated ride about three 
minutes, Costello said. 

"Motion simulators have become 
popular attractions worldwide due to 
their incredible realism and their Abroad 
appeal to all ages. Simulators synchronize 
hydra ill icully activated scats exciting film, 
giving passengers a realistic sensation of 
movement in "real time" with the film 
adventure they are watching. The 
sophisticated, computer-monitored 



system puts guests in the middle of the 
action by surrounding them with a 
simultaneous/visual audio and physical 
ride experience," a Great America 
statement read. 

Indeed, the phrase "Go to the Moon" 
has its positive impacts as well as 
negative. 

"Going to the moon is a man's 
universal dream," Jim Wintrodc, 
president of Six Flags Great America, said. 

Costello said Six Flags personnel met 
with NASA officials to make the attraction 



authentic as possible. 

As guests enter the five-story attraction 
they will be prepared for a space shuttli 
flight to Armstrong City, a futuristic mooi 
colony. They will receive briefings fo 
what is considered to be a "routini 
mission." 

The film for Space Shuttle America h 
produced by Dream Quest Images in Sim 
Valley, Calif. Up to 100 guests may expe 
rience Space Shuttle America at one tlmt 
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M*«cli 11) 1994 UkcUvJ Newspapers COUNTY ' I 




ns have 



TINA L SWIECH 



Staff Reporter 

For over twenty years, the 
Wauconda Township Republican 
Club has had their traditional St. 
Patrick's Day Dinner, coupled by 
an evening with the candidates. 

One of the highlights of the 
event at the Wauconda American 
Legion Hall Post 911; was speaker 
Congressman Phil Crane, a resi- 
dent of Wauconda. 

But before Crane took to the 
.podium, take County Sheriff 
.. Clint Grinncll did the honors of 
swearing in new officers. 

The new president of the 

Juvenile— 

From page Bl 

The SMART program would 
be an internal residential (24- 
hours) project for adolescent 
male delinquents. It would pro- 
vide a creatively blended military 
regimen which includes vigorous 
exercise, schooling, therapy, and 
public service. The purpose of 
the SMART program is to develop 
and mature delinquent males 
- and eliminate their involvement 
in the criminal justice system. 

The planned day treatment 
program called the Vector 
Program would be available for 
both male and female adolescent 
delinquents. This project would 
include physical and stress chal- 
lenges, behavior management, 
value training, life skills, acade- 
mics, drug and alcohol as well as 
individual and family counseling, 
health and physical education, 
community restitution, gang 
reduction, and public service; 

The cost of this referendum 
" would increase property taxes on 
a $150,000 home by $1 a month. 



township Republican Club, is not 
a new face in politics. Vcnita 
McConnel - has served In 
Republican party posts from the 
County Executive Committee to 
Wauconda village clerk. 

The former club president, 
Dec Amundson, is the daughter 
of McConnel. 

Also sworn in were Ginger 
Dickson; as vice-president; 
Joanne Becker as treasurer; 
Phyliss Dickson as secretary; 
Amundson as corresponding sec- 
retary; and Bob Collins as 
Sergeant at Arms. 

Judge Charles Scott, of the 
19th judicial district and candi- 
date for the appellate court said 
the invocation before the meal. 

Members of the club served 
up the all-you-can-cat corned 
beef and cabbage dinner. Some 
of the servers were Island Lake 
Trustee and Township 
Republican Committeeman 
Chairman Fred Bigham; John 
McConnel; Steve Barans; Gary 
Rcynhcart; Dec Amundson and 
her daughter, and many more 
club members. 




LCAFCE 

scholarships 
offered 

The Lake County Association 
for Family and Community 
Education (formerly known as 
the Lake County Homemakers 
Extension Association) is seeking 
applicants for the annual scholar- 
ships awarded in memory of 
Helen Johnson Volk. Application 
forms arc available at the Lake 
County Cooperative Extension 
Office, 100 S. Hwy. 45, Grayslake, 
and through counselors at high 
schools in the county. 

All applicants must have been 
accepted in college as a full time 
student working towards a 
degree, rank in the upper half of 
their high school class, have been 
a Lake County 4-1 1 member for at 
least three years or their mother 
must currently be a member of 
the LCAFCE and have been. a 
member In good standing for a 
minimum of three years. An 
LCAFCE member working toward 
a degree as a part-time student 
may apply for a scholarship 
based on the number of credit 
hours. Scholarship not to exceed 
the cost of credit hours to said 
member. Applications will be 
reviewed by the Scholarship 
Committee and winners wiU be 
selected in time to be announced 
at Honors Day ceremonies. 

Deadline for application Is 
May 1. For further information, 
call 362-1066. 



Among the nearly 200 guests 
in attendance was State's 
Attorney Mike Waller and his wife 
Judge Jane Waller; Island Lake 
Mayor Charles Amrlch and 
Trustee Beverly Anderson; Lake 
County Treasurer Jack "Red" 
Anderson; Ed Sindlcs, candidate 
for sheriff and his wife Mundelcin 
Mayor Marilyn Sindlcs; Kathy 
Salvl, representing ' State 
Representative Al Salvl; Judge 
Louis Rathjc, candidate for the 
appellate ■ court; Senator Bill 
Peterson; congressional candi- 
date-Gary Skoicn; arid Judge 
Barbara Gillcran-Johnson the 
first woman candidate In the his- 
tory of the appellate court, 2nd 
district. 

Candidate Wiilard Helander, 
got a round of applause when she 
was announced as being the next 
Lake; County Clerk; by positive 
Republican Club members. 

.'• Pat Uriarte was introduced by 
Trustee Bigham as vying for the 
position of Lake County 
Republican Chairperson. Uriarte 
noted that State Representative 
Bob Churchill will not vie again 



for the scat this year. 

New president of the club, 
McConnel, defended 

Congressman Crane in a short 
speech she gave to the audience. 

Crane held the crowds inter- 
est discussing the state of the 



nation's finances then briefly 
warning how it won't Improve, if 
opposition get their way. 

In closing, Crane told the 
group, "The world's last and best 
hope is you people in this room, 
and the Republican Party." 



i 







Sheriff Clint Grlnnell swears In new officers for the Wauconda 
Township Republican Party at their annual dinner.— Photo by Tina 
Swfech 




i 
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• 






Stop revolving door at our Detention Center. 
Increase it's capacity from 18 beds to 36 beds. 

Introduce discipline and structure into young 
offenders' lives. Create a 22 bed boot camp 
and residential treatment facility. 

Reintroduce family values by creating a 12 
capacity day treatment facility. 

Give the courts and the police the tools to do 
their job at a cost of $1 .00 per month. 



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GET TOUGH ON 




PUNCH 
140 



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VOTE MARCH 1 5 

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Wm COUNTY UktlANtl NtwspApcRs MaiicIi 11, 1994 



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MarcIi 11, 1994 UkeUNd NEWspApcRS COUNTY' 1 ^? , 



TO ALL VOTERS IN THE MARCH 15™ PRIMARY 

In the campaign for the 8th Congressional District, you've seen Phil Crane's three opponents 
engage in some of the most vicious negative campaigning that this area has ever seen. Even 
though Phil Crane has never been involved in any of the scandals that have plagued Congress, 
you've seen one opponent's literature try to imply that Phil Crane is a "crook" by linking him 
to Democrat Dan Rostenkowski. Another candidate's brochure would almost have you 
believe that Phil Crane shot Abe Lincoln! You've seen Phil Crane's opponents engage in child- 
ish circus atmosphere press conferences, and you've seen a wealthy ambitious bank attorney bury 
the district in junk mail. Now that you've heard from the challengers perhaps you ought to hear 
from someone who knows something about Phil Crane and his efforts to change things in 
Washington. In a letter to Phil Crane, former President Ronald Reagan said the following: 

" Without your efforts in the House our Second American Revolution 
of hope, strength, and opportunity could never have taken place. 
Above all, I know you share my conviction that the best is yet to come" 

But don't just take Ronald Reagan's word for it, here's what other people have to say: 

,• , ■ ■ 

"When the going is the toughest, you don't look to the rookie on the 
bench. We need Phil Crane's experience and leadership fighting for 
Republican principles in Congress." 

lack Kemp 

Former Congressman & Cabinet Secretary 

"As a Representative serving my first term in Congress my goal is to 
shake things up -change things for the better. I can't think of a better 
role model for those of us fighting for that change than Phil Crane. 
Phil Crane has been fighting to change things in Washington all his life." 

.__ Congressman Don Manzullq . 

16th District -Illinois 



. , "Let's hear it for Rep. Phil Crane of Illinois! He was the only member 

with the guts to vote against programs that never should have been 
started in the first place and ought to be phased out now." 

James J. Kilpatrick 

Nationally Syndicated Columnist 

"Phil Crane is a man of principle, a man of integrity, and a man of the 
people. He is a man who understands the importance of family and 
the values necessary to sustain the family." 

Senior Pastor Frank W. Bumpus 
Bethel Baptist Church 

"Phil Crane is the kind of tough guerrilla fighter we need in Washington 
now that Bill Clinton has taken over the town." 

i ■ Congressman Bob Dornan 

Occasional host of the Rush Limbaugh Show. 

****••**** 

- WE DON'T NEED A CHANGE IN THE 8TH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT - 
- WE NEED MORE PEOPLE LIKE PHIL CRANE IN CONGRESS - 



PHIL CRANE— REPUBLICAN — VOTE MARCH 15 

Paid for by Crane for Congress Committee 



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EDITORIAL UkclANd NrwspApcits MarcIi 11, 1994 




, A majority of the voters of the 8th Congressional dis r 
trict covering west Lake County and northwest Cook 
County are quite different' than other voters in Illinois 
and elsewhere in the nation. They are ultra- conserva- 
tive. They aren't looking for federal handouts. And 
they hate the hell-bent, socialistic bound direction the 
federal government is taking. 

That's why Republicans are comfortable with their 
Congressman, U.S. Rep. Philip Crane, a former univer- 
sity professor who probahly is the most conservative 
. member of Congress. Crane routinely votes against 
spending measures. Crane has become the anti-thesis 
of pork barrelling. ' 

In a quarter of a century in Washington, Phil Crane 
has become a rallying point for the pitifully small 
group of Republicans in Washington who understand 
the principles of conservatism and refuse to be caught 
up in governing fads and wacko thinking like increased 
spending to "control" the federal deficit. 
Liberals in the media and Republican moderates 

Ladd rated edge 
in Atty. Gen. race 

The Republican ballot March 15 is blessed with two 
capable and high quality candidates for attorney gen- 
eral, a constitutional office you only hear about at j; 
election time. 

State's Atty. James "Jim" Ryan of DuPage is making 
his second attempt to gain the office. Jeff Ladd, an 
attorney from Crystal Lake who has been serving as 
head of Metra, the rail arm of the Regional 
Transportation Authority, is making his first bid for 
state-wide office. 

Either one will do an excellent job if elected in :■ 
November. We think Ladd has a distinct edge because 
of his administrative background with a huge public 
agency and his long-standing commitment to better 
government first made public in 1970 as a Con-Con 
delegate. Ladd is recommended. 

GrinneU's record 
earns nomination 

Sheriff Clinton Grinnell isn't in the political battle of % 
the century arid we don't happen to think he is in trou- 

. ble getting renominated to run for another term in 
November. 

But opponent Ed Sindles, a life-long professional 
policeman who also teaches law enforcement, has 
livened the Republican primary with his.personal - 
energy and a barrage of ideas for improving the office, 
many of which aren't new and most which would 
bankrupt Lake County. 

The interesting thing about the challenger is that he 
wins even if he loses. Sindles has been insisting from 
the start that the sheriff won't finish his term despite 
repeated protestations from Grinnell: Even if Grinnell 
resigns, Sindles' primary effort would give him the ■ ; 
inside track for appointment by the County Board; 

: The Sindles strategy also covers the option that his 
1994 race will make him the leading candidate to suc- 
ceed Grinnell in 1998. 

Beyond the politicking of Sindles, the fact remains 
that Clint Grinnell has been an excellent sheriff, run- 
ning a high profile, difficult agency without a hint of 
scandal as he has for the six years he has been in 
office. Grinnell has set a standard for honesty and per- : \ 
sonal conduct, ayailibility to the public and profes- 
sionalism that no Lake County sheriff within memo 

' Ihasrhatched. 

Grinnell has husbanded funds provided for law 

■ ^enforcement wisely. A consumate team player, 
GrinneU's style has been to let others take credit for 
accomplishments of the department where'justified. 

JuAs supervisor of the county's model jail, Sindles has 

^beeiiabie to stand in thelspotlight of liiationalJacdaiiTi^^ 
because of the sheriff s natural inclination to spread 
the plaudits around^ 
Even though newill reach retirement age ;mid-wav 

'iu^roughlii0erm,; Grinnell deserves L to continue as 

l^erinVThejattable, low-key life-long lawman should 
be renominated because fie has earneo^renomination: ;, 



have been preaching for years that Crane is "out of 
touch" and "removed" in an effort the replace him 
with more malable representation. The feet is that Phil ; 
Crane represents his district well^sharirig the con- ; 
tempt of Republicans in a district running from 
Ahtioch to Schaumburgfor centralization arid wild 
and uncontrolled spending. 

At age 63, Crane hasn't lost his zeal to vote no on 
nonsensical money bills. He also speaks out in favor of 
pro-life and free trade. Phil drives the liberals crazy. 
We suspect a majority of his cbnstitutiehts delight in 
tweaking the go-aldngs, tinkerers and reformists in 
both parties. We heartily endorse Phil Crane for 
renomination. v 

fjCrahe's opposition in the primary includes a one- 
time protege who is breaking records for campaigri 
spending (State Sen., Peter-Fitzgerald ■ -33) ; a moderate 
businessman (Gary Skoien, 40) and a Barrington . 
lawyer whose campaign .hasn't gotten off the ground 
(Judy McCracken Svenson, 56). ^ 



■.'■■■' '.'■. 



LL/I I UKI/XL Newspapers 




— ViEwpoiNT— — 

Four races capture 
center stage 



Bill SCHROEPER 

Publisher 

The primary election of March 
15 is offering the first opportunity 
to assess changes taking place in 
campaigning for office since sin- 
gle district representation was 
adopted for the Lake County 
Board two years ago. 

For one thing, campaigning is 
more personal. Candidates also 
arc intrigued by the reality that 
campaigning is less expensive 
because there is less territory to 
cover and a smaller number of 
voters to reach. 

Following are our views on four 
of the seven districts where there 
arc contests in the March 15 pri- 
mary. Sixteen of the County 
Board representatives drew four- 
year terms and will not he up for 
reelection until 1996. 

******* 

ANTIOCH — A changing voting 
populace may determine 
whether Rep. Jim Fields remains 
in office as the relentless pursuit 
of Judy Martini to replace the vet- 
eran politician who also has 
served in the dual capacity of 
township supervisor for a num- 
ber of years. The crafty Fields 
has been able to fend off double 
dipping charges with the same 
case of dispatching Martini. 

Martini, who was elected to the 
non-paid position as water dis- 
trict director, has failed to unseat 
Fields In two previous attempts, 
once for supervisor and two years 
ago in the Republican primary for 
County Board. 

Newcomers are tending to view 
Fields as a political insider who 
represents vested interests to. 
protect both^fllls county and 
township jobs. - Martini Is 
attempting to capitalize on her 
opponent's support for riverboat 



casino gambling in an area where 
gambling was defeated In an 
advisory referendum. A real 
estate broker, Martini is offering 
herself as a better representative 
of the concerns of voters plus a 
willingness to take stands on dif- 
ficult issues. . 

Fields, never noted for original 
thinking or independence, seems 
more in tune with the slower 
pace of township government. 
Antioch voters would do well to 
try new county board representa- 
tion this year. Both Martini and 
Grant Farrell, who is running 
unopposed as a Democrat, arc 
endorsed. 

.•*•*•*• 

' NEWPORT TOWNSHIP — 

County Board Rep. Bob Ncal sel- 
dom leaves any doubt where he 
stands or who he stands with. 
Consequently,, controversy has 
become his middle name. 

With encouragement from the 
grassroots movement to get more 
women on the County Board, 
Supervisor MUdred "Millie" 
Cordcr is challenging Ncal in the 
Republican primary. Ncal loves 
a fight. He's at odds with the 
power structure over construc- 
tion of the Yorkhousc Rd. exten- 
sion, which won't hurt his 
chances for reelection and solidi- 
fies his reputation for unpre- 
dictability. , 

A big advantage Ncal has over 
Cordcr is that he knows the work- 
ings of county government, 
Which Is more than Cordcr and a 
majority of County Board mem- 
bers can say. Neal is preferred. 
******* 

MUNDELEIN — The Republi- 
can primary pits Colin McRac, a 
seasoned County Board repre- 
sentative against Diana O'Keliey, 
a political neophyte. 
. McRae distinguished himself as 




a leader in the passage of a $30 
referendum for expansion of 'the ' 
Lake County Forest Preserve Dist. 
of which he is president. McRae 
has strong- views oh how home 
construction and job growth can 
coexist with preservation of open 
space and protection of the envi- 
ronment. He has been putting 
his negotiating skills learned in 
the real estate industry to good 
use in the political arena with 
considerable savings in legal fees 
incurred by the Forest Preserve 
Dist. as a result. 

This is no time to replace a 
respected leader with a newcom- 
er, albeit a well intended but 
woefully inexperienced newcom- 
er. McRae is endorsed. The 
Democrats have no candidate in 
the primary. 

• ••**•• 

SOUTH CENTRAL— 

Incumbent Dist. 18 Rep. Pam 
Newton of Vernon Hills is pitted 
against former Rep. Bobbie 
O'Reilly of Long Grove in the 
Republican primary. There is no 
Democratic contest. 

In her first term, Newton has 
established a reputation for hard 
work with a deeply felt commit- 
ment to represent the diverse 
interests of a district that includes 
part of Vernon Hills, Prairie View, 
Buffalo Grove, Long Grove, unin- 
corporated Forest Lake, 
Hawthorn Woods and a corner of 
Ela Township. 

Newton and O'Reilly arc a con- 
trast in style, Newton preferring 
cooperation and concensus while 
O'Reilly tends to be more con- 
frontational. Stung in her cam- 
paign two years ago by a charge 
that she is a tool of developers, 
Newton has worked hard to culti- 
vate a. reputation for indepen- 
dence. Newton is recommended. 



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March IT, 1994 UI(eIan(INdvs|jap€RS COUNTY 




Party Lines—— 

Election path not 
always rosy 



Party Lines, the Lakeland 
. Newspapers column of politi- 
cal opinion.is prepared from 
staff reports. 

Through heavy winter 
snows, ice storms, below 
zero temperatures, and even 
warm-ups with floods, many 
candidates risked life and 
limb to get the word up this 
campaign season. Judy 
Martini, County Board can- 
didate (R-Dist. 1) found her- 
self bottoms-up in a drive- 
way when knocking on 
doors iri Antioch. 

County Board incum- 
bent, Pamela Newton (R- 
District 18) found herself 
snowed in while she was on 
the campaign trail. Newton 
was putting up a campaign 
sign on what she thought 
was level ground. To her 
surprise arid five feet deep in 
the snow later, she realized 
the level ground she was on 
was actually a snowbank. 
Advice: Don't always bank 
on the snowbank. 

Bobble O'Reilly, County 
Board candidate (R-Dist 18) 
really had a bad time of it. 
She reports being bitten by 
two different dogs. O" Rcilly 
can't understand it because 
she says that she loves dogs. 
For the capper ofher cam- 
paigning experience this 
. winter was having her car 
put into a ditch. H\ n 

[]ln between daily visits to 
a chiropractor, County" 
..(Board (R-Dist 10) candidate 
Diana 0'KeU.y continues to 
talk with the people she 
wants to represent O' Kelly's 
car was hit from behind as 
she made her way home on 
an icy road from a busy day 



of campaigning Feb. 25. 

Pat Loslnski, Warren- 
Newport IHibllc Library 
director, kept his talks short 
about the upcoming library 
referendum. It was not a .' 
lack of dedication, but the 
fact his wife was due to have 
a baby agy minute. The 
Losinski's are proud to 
announce the birth of their j 
son, John Edward on Feb. 
19. No doubt, the speeches 
are longer now. 

Jim Fields, incumbent 
and Republican contender 
for District 1, reports having 
no harrowing experiences 
while on the campaign trail. 
Maybe another benefit of 
incumbency? 



• • • 



Surprised— Republican 
contender for Sheriff, Ed 
Sindlcs could not have been 
that surprised by the 
endorsement by Barbara 
Richardson, County 
Coroner. Their picture was 
snapped together with big 
smiles on their faces during 
Sindlcs fund raiser at 
Country Squire, last 
Wednesday. That was two 
days before the official 
endorsement 



• • • 



Signs of the times- 
Political signs arc a focal 
point. of any election: Just 
ask Lake County Board ' - 
member Bob Neal (R- 
Wadswprth). "One year, I 
said I appreciated a man 
who let me put a sign in his 
yard. Without hesitation, he 
satd. 'I appreciate the way 
you represent you'," Neal 
recalled. 



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ENTARy — -— 

Saving child equates to $12 per year tax 



JOHN H. WARD 
Commentary 

During ' the past several 
months, the. state and national 
media have focused attention on 
the growing problems within 
juvenile justice programs and 
their related facilities. Local offi- 
cials too, have become increas- 
ingly concerned with Lake 
County's Juvenile Justice System. 



The Lake County Board received 
a report from Towers Perrin 
Consultants in relation to a 
capacity analysis of the I lulsc 
Detention Center. 

In their findings, the building 
housing the Juvenile Court and 
Juvenile Probation offices was 
originally designed and con- 
structed in 1956. It was modified 
to its current configuration in 



1970, the same year the newly 
built 18-bcd Hulsc Detention 
Center was opened. Since 1970, 
no additional space has been 
allocated to the juvenile justice 
system. 

The system now faces over- 
whelming demands. Despite the 
maintenance of effective and 
responsive Juvenile intake sts.i 
Sec COMMENTARY page D 17 



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COUNTY UIceIancI Newspapers Mam* 11, 1994 






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WhAT Rea(1ers are SAyiNq 




h 

1; 



Time for a stop 

Editor 

If it is true that a nation's art reflects its "soul," then, 
based on what many NEA (National Endowment for the 
Arts) funded artists exhibit, the soul of our nation is death- 
ly HI. However, an Important question to ask is whether or 
not government-funded art accurately portrays our soul. 

In 1 992, $9.3 billion was spent on advancing the arts by 
the private sector. Last year's NEA appropriation was $174 
million, or less than two percent of all funding in America 
for the arts. Why should the government spend any 
money at all funding this program which has adequate 
private support? Art should stand on its own merits, sup- 
ported solely by those who view or buy it, or arc willing to 
privately fund It. Maybe then It wUl more accurately 
reflect our soul. 

Phil Crane should be commended for wanting to dis- 
band the NEA and its funding of indecent and controver- 
sial artists and groups such as Maplcthorpc, whose idea of 
art is to place a crucifix in a glass of urine, or theaters that 
. present erotic lewd simulated sex acts. Most Americans 
And this kind of art repulsive. 

Since the NEA awards grants to only one-fourth of 
those who apply for them, it opens Itself to lawsuits. The 
Justice Department recently settled a lawsuit brought 
against the NEA by four disgruntled performing artist who 
were not given grants. The cost to taxpayers was $252, 000 
in defense fees. 

Let the private sector support the arts and men like 
Maplcthorpc if it wishes, but don't ask me to spend even 
one penny of my tax dollars to do so. If we arc going to 
reduce the deficit, it is time to start wiping out nickel and 
dime programs like the NEA. Nickels and dimes have a 
way of adding up to dollars, many of them. Mr. Skoicn, 
who supports the NEA, is welcome to give as much of his 
own money as he wishes to the arts. But he is not welcome 
to give mine. 

Jan Webb 
Grayslakc 

Effective senator 

Editor 

Some voters in the Eighth Congressional district argue 
that we should maintain Congressman Phil Crane 
because of his seniority and supposed clout. This is a 
myth. 

Despite his 25 years in Congress, Crane has little influ- 
ence on the political process. According to third party 
sources, Phil Crane has shown little effort in attempting to 
influence policy in Washington. 

I compare that to Peter Fitzgerald's work in Springfield. 
Fitzgerald is one of the most effective Senators. He clearly 
attempts on a regular basis to influence policy. 

Wc need new energy, not seniority, in our 
Congressional representation. 

Shannon L. Castello 
Harrington Hills 

Represents change 

Editor 

Something exciting and refreshing is taking place with- 
in the Eighth Congressional District. After 25 years of stag- 
nant incumbency, someone is finally trying to rock the 
boat and change this district for the better. His name is 
State Senator Peter G. Fitzgerald. . 

Peter Fitzgerald is energetic, motivated, enthusiastic, 
and brings a fresh set of eyes to the imminent problems 
that career politicians have brought upon us. Twenty-five 
years in public office is just too long. It would be different 
if the incumbent congressman had not lost his focus, 
unfortunately, he has. 

Peter Fitzgerald's legislative and policy initiatives are 
second to none. In his first year in the State Senate, he was 
the sponsor of thirteen bills, of which five were passed. 
According to a study done by "Illinois Politics," Fitzgerald 
had the highest "legislative batting average" of any fresh- 
man in the Illinois House or Senate, and the fourth high- 
est overall in the State Senate. 

Fitzgerald is taking impressive stances on many issues. 
He passed a tough six point anti-crime program that 
includes mandatory sentences and tougher penalties for 
people who sell liquor to minors. He supports laws to take 
assault weapons out of the hands of criminals. The Illinois 
Environment Council named Fitzgerald to its 
Environmental Honor Roll for passing laws to protect 
open space and natural resources. As well, the President 
of the Illinois Taxpayers' Federation praised Fitzgerald for 
his efforts to fight debt and balance the budget. Peter 
Fitzgerald is a "Can-Do" Conservative. 

When the primary elections occur on March 15, the 
voters of the Eighth Congressional District must ask 
themselves, do they want more stagnant politics or do 
they want an energetic, motivated and enthusiastic con- 
gressman who will lead this district into the future? Peter 
G. Fitzgerald will provide that leadership and deserves 
your vote for Congress on March 15. 

Scott P. Gregory 
; ';';':, Barrington 



Juvenile referendum needed 

Editor 

Recently, an Illinois Supreme Court Commission char- 
acterized the state's juvenile system as one "in a crisis, a 
system which is vastly underfunded, ovcrobligatcd and 
overwhelmed." 

Tliis is certainly true in Lake County. With nearly 
600,000 residents, our juvenile detention center has only 
10 beds. The Center was built 16 years ago when our pop- 
ulation was much smaller and our young people were far 
less violent. Today, wc sec gangs, guns and crack cocaine. 
Today's juvenile crimes arc murder, armed robbery, 
armed violence, mob action, aggravated battery, aggra- 
vated assault and unlawful use of weapons. In the last 
three years atone, there has been a staggering 300 percent 
increase in violent crime in Lake County. Rarely do we In 
the criminal justice system have room for nonviolent 
offenders. In fact, when wc arc at capacity, wc have no 
choice but to play Russian Roulette. We must release cer- 
tain offenders to make room for others, and wc arc forced 
to refuse referrals from your police. As a result, the police 
have become so discouraged with our current situation 
that frequently they do not bother to bring other than the 
most serious offenders into the system. 

Even when less serious juvenile offenders arc brought 
into our system, we have no residential treatment capa- 
bility to rehabilitate them. All of us know the earlier the 
intervention, the greater likelihood of success, but our 
residential treatment was eliminated three years ago 
because of the greater need for more detention space. 
Frequently, this causes costly placement outside Lake 
County so this can only be used sparingly. 

Our present situation is critical— wc can no longer ade- 
quately protect our citizens by juvenile incarceration nor 
rehabilitate the youthful offenders here in Lake County. 
Thus wc seek voter support of our referendum in the pri- 
mary on March 15 to fund necessary improvements. 

Our task force has devised an improvement plan which 
emphasize local, cost efficient solutions. We plan to use a 
local residential treatment program called SMART 
(Structured Military and Residential Treatment). This 
program incorporates Boot Camp type regimentation and 
discipline coupled with counseling and education. The 
old detention center will be used for this purpose; with 
minor remodeling, it would provide 22 beds. 

In addition, a new detention facility would be con- 
structed to house 36 inmates. Tills number is recom- 
mended to meet current and future needs. Finally, wc will 
utilize a day treatment program for the care of 12 youths. 
As you can sec, wc will then be able to provide a total 
treatment program for 70 offenders. We feci this should 
be adequate until 2010. 

The cost of this three-phased attack on juvenile crime 
will amount to $1 per month for the average homeowner 
in Lake County. Our plan has received widespread sup- 
port from the media, public industry, the law enforce- 
ment community and citizen groups. It can only become 
reality with voter approval. 

Our difficulty with the referendum program is its req- 
uisite wording: 

"Shall the extension limitation under the Property 
Limitation Act for the County of Lake is increased from 2.7 
to 8.7 percent for the 1994 levy year?" 

Every voter needs to know what they are really voting 
for when they read this question — our county's juvenile 
improvement plan. Your Lake County Judiciary seeks 
your support March 15. Do the right thing for the future of 
Lake County— help preserve the quality of life that wc all 
want. Please punch 140. 

John R. Goshgarian 
Waukcgan 

Support Calebresa 

Editor 

I've told my kids that our government works like this: . 
You vote for politicians whose views most closely repre- 
sent yours, and they'll represent you with their votes, In 
truth, campaign promises often give way to special inter- 
est pressure. Not so with Carol Calebresa. She has the 
courage not to give In to special interest groups. AS a 
County Board member she has been a consistent conser- 
vationist. I'll continue to stand by Carol Calebresa 
because she has continued to stand by us. 

Trish Fort 
Ubertyville 

Protecting all 

Most voters in Lake County are aware that the tax 
Increase would go from 2.7 to 8.7 percent on the county 
portion of the property tax. Some people feel this increase 
is inappropriate and the county should find alternative 
measures to solve its problem. 

Following are some of the appropriate suggestions 
from voters, none of them arc without cost. Many felt 
juveniles should be tried as, adults and jailed in an adult 
facility. Babcock Center would do just fine. (Keep your eye 
on this one; it^ottfd'really cost) Each municipality should 
be responsible for its own juvenile problems. Equip each 



household with its choice of guns for protection. Find sev- 
eral hundred families to provide foster care to alleviate 
overcrowding. Nice, but not enough families have volun- 
teered to make a difference. 

One must accept the reality that counseling and re- 
educating teens must be done with patience, talent and a 
lot of time. The reward from this care is one could devel- 
op an individual responsible to family and community as 
a worker and a taxpayer. Look carefully at the next child's 
face in the news caught for some trespass on society. It 
could be your neighbor's child or your own. How that 
child is cared for now may be the difference between a 
respectable person or one who will be supported in prison 
for the rest of his life. Now that is really big money. 

Shirley F.Williams 
Deerficld 
* 

Support Dlst. 46 

Editor: . 

Consider this: You arc the chief executive officer of a 
company, the top decision -maker. You sec shrinking 
economy where the demands for your company's services 
or products arc significantly reduces and where competi- 
tors struggle to grasp every fraction of the market that you 
share with them. You arc required to make difficult deci- 
sions to streamline productivity, reduce staff, and shut 
down operations in less profitable areas. You pull in the 
reins. 

Thus, your organization survives. When the storm 
passes, you expand outward once again to meet rising 
demands and renewed operations. You are a hero! 

Typically, this same business philosophy is applied to 
local public schools during economic downturns. 
Unfortunately, the principles of supply and demand sim- 
ply do nor apply to the school system. In spite of the state 
of economic conditions, whatever they might be, it is the 
completely dependent population of children which 
determines the amount of services required of a school 
district As long as we the people believe in the right of 
every parent to obtain quality education for their children 
as a public service, wc must face the obligation of provid- 
ing that service for them. 

When wc twist the burden of personal obligation into 
false accusations of fiscal irresponsibility and indiscrimi- 
nate priorities, we shirk our, duties as citizens of the com- 
munity. Few people fully understand the maze of factors 
contributing to the predicament of public school districts. 
But those who recognize this conspiracy of factors also . 
know that they contribute most harmfully in rapidly- 
growing, predominantly-residential, collar-county ills-, 
tricts like District 46 in Grayslake, Round Lake Beach, and 
Third Lake. 

Now that the general economy is coming around, there 
is even less reason to hold back bur commitment to our 
schools. As long as we recognize the high value of social- 
ly-minded and career-directed academic instruction, wc 
must compensate for the lack of state support and unbal- 
anced property tax policies. Wc must trust that board 
members and district administrators have done their very 
best to avoid direct impact on essential education ser- 
vices. For indeed, this is what they have done by making 
difficult choices. We must recognize the value of our sac- 
rifice and decide accordingly in favor of the children. 

Ensure their future. Vote "Yes" for the combined refer- 
endum issues for Community Consolidated Elementary 
School District 46 on Tuesday. 

Steve Bartlk 
Grayslakc 

Attendance poor 

Editor 

I am a senior citizen who worked all my life. I always 
had to show up for work-, or else I wouldn't get paid. If I 
missed too many days, I would get fired. That's the way 
things used to be in this country, but I guess it's not the 
same anymore. 

I've learned that Colin McRac, my County Board mem- 
ber missed 67 percent of the Finance Committee meet- 
ings last year. That sure sounds like an important com- 
mittee to me! He also missed 67 percent of the Board of 
Health meetings. 

These are a major part of the job were paying him to 
do, yet he bothers to go to them only one third of the time. 

McRae is trying to claim that the figures are made up, 
but I can assure you they are not. The proof exists in black 
and white, in the recorded minutes of those meetings, and 
I have seen those minutes. 

How long would your employer let you keep working 
and collect full pay if you missed two out of three days 
while on a specific job? I know the answer, and so do you. 

Well, you and I arc Colin McRac 's boss. Arc we going to 
let him keep goofing off? 

Voting for Diana O'Kelly is the only way wc can fire 
Colin McRac, so that's what I plan to do. Maybe you 
should too, 

Truman Alford 
Mundclcln 



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Paulson clear choice 

Editor: 

Tlic clear choice in the upcoming ; 
Republican primary for County Board in 
Dist. 15 is Marty Paulson. 

Marty Is a lifelong Lake County resident . 
who is committed to Improving how gov- 
ernment works. In his involvements, in 
local government at the village, township 
and county levels, he has made contribu- 
tions that have Improved our community. 

Most notably, Marty has worked on the 
Libcrtyville Civic Center Commission 
researching the needs for a local civic cen- 
ter; he has been the president of the Lake 
County Board of Health— the county's 
largest department; and active in the fight 
to keep the Great Lakcs~Naval Training 
Center open. Marty is also active with our 
youth, having been a coach in local bas- 
ketball and soccer leagues. 

As a local businessman, he understands 
that our government has to start working 
. in our best interests. Marty has made great . 
strides at the Board of Health, taking a 
financially troubled department and 
putting it on solid footing. He believes that 
government has to change the way it docs 
business, moving away from the tradition- 
al approach of always asking the taxpayer 
for more — to being introspective and 
looking at greater efficiencies. 

Marty deserves a chance. His opponent 
is a three-time incumbent with little to 
show for her time. It is time to turn over 
the reigns of Dist. 15 to Marty Paulson. 

Kirk Morabito 
Libcrtyville 



Voters should 
demand dignity 

Editor 

I would think many of the supporters 
of Robert pepke, chairman of the Lake 
County Board and Colin McRac, president 
of. the Forest Preserve District' and their 
favored lieutenants, Fields, Newton and 
Neal i and would be embarrassed to death. 
' '''.Their ieadcrs, Dcpke and McRac, have 
revived the bully boys image, long absent 
from the County Board, What is equally 

. puzzling is the lack of critical editorial 
ncwS media when both shut off board, 
members' microphones on anyone who 
dares' to oppose them during County 
Board meetings. 

No one expects any more from Dcpke 
who has a long history of such tactics. 
Now, sue foot, three Inch McRae reportcd- 

• ly is flexing his muscle on 110 pound 
Martha Macks. A pox is not only on Dcpke 
and McRae, but their County Board sup- 
porters who shamelessly allow it. And, the - 
biggest culprits of all are the 70 percent of 
the public who don't bother to vote in 
local elections. Hopefully, they will wake 
up before March 15 and get out and vote, 
demanding some dignity and decorum 
from their elected officials, 

F.T. "Mike" Graham 
Libcrtyville 

Crane tells us what 
he can't do 

Editor. 

Phil Crane tells us a freshman con- 
gressman can't get laws passed. Phil Crane 
tells us a freshman congressman can't 
build coalitions. Phil Crane tells us fresh- 
man congressman can't make persuasive 
arguments. When you think about what 
Phil Crane tells us, he's actually telling us 
about himself. What good is a 25 year con- 
gressman that amounts to being a rookie. 
Phil Crane is great at telling us what can't 
be done. 

Richard E. Conley 
Gurnce 
■ * 

We need Fitzgerald 

Dear Editor. 

I have been a resident of the eighth 
congressional district for close to 20 years. 
Up until recently I have been half-hearted 
in taking an interest in political issues. 
Thanks to presidential ineptitude, I find it 
necessary, to do my part. The purpose of 
this letter is not to humiliate the president, 
he does that fine himself. I would rather 
: mention something more local. 

On March 15, the polls open for the 
primaries. The congressional race is fore- 



most on my mind. I have researched the 
candidates for the eighth congressional 
district and find that only two can betaken 
seriously. These two arc the only candi- 
dates that know what it takes to pass legis- 
lation; Senator Peter Fitzgerald and 
Congressman Phil Crane. 

Congressman Crane has proven him- 
self a good voter and his near quarter cen- 
tury incumbency grants him seniority. 
Seniority is an important thing, when the 
character and zeal of an individual fails. 
Truth be told, experience is useless when 
coupled with complacency. Phil Crane has 
become stole, voting only on issues put 
before him, and Initiating no new propos- 
als. Phil Crane is a far different man than 
he was when first elected. Now more than 
ever we need someone with fresh energy 
and vigor. • 

Senator Peter Fitzgerald is who we 
need! As a freshman senator, he has been 
a powerhouse in initiating and passing 
legislation. In Springfield, Peter Fitzgerald 
has passed legislation through a democra- 
tically dominated house, something Phil 
Crane could never do. I can find no one 
who would be better qualified as a fresh- 
man congressman. We need energy, we 
need vigor, and we heed a person* who will 
fight for us in Congress. We need Peter 
Fitzgerald! 

John.Monaghan 
Park City, IL . 

Chain improves 

When I first moved -to Lake County in 
1975 I was reluctant to purchase a home 
on the Chain of Lakes because many 
regarded the water as dirty and unsafe. 
Upon buying my first boat in 1977 and 
'soon growing tired of boating around in 
circles on smaller lakes I took to the Chain. 

In 191)3 1 bought a home on Fox Lake 
and soon realized that these waters were 
failing caused by the filling in with silt, the 
disregard to the well being of the lakes by 
many who used them. Dead fish, beer 
cans, tree branches, etc. . 
" It seems the attitude of the people who 
traveled here to use these waters was that 
when this is dead we will go somewhere 
else. 

Then came the Chain-O-Lakcs Fox 
River Waterway Management Agency and 
things have improved. Improvements 
seem slow but after 100 years or more of 
misuse and neglect I understand that it 
cannot be turned around overnight. 
Although turbid the quality of the water 
has improved. Navigation has been made 
easier and safer. 

Upon paying a user fee it seems to 
awaken an awareness in the average 
boater that this is not an area to use and 
throw away. Also they may be from anoth- 
* cr area but they now have a vested interest 
in the well being of these waters. 

-FredHerdrich 
Lake Villa 

Listen to the people 

Editor. 

It's becoming very unusual to read the 
paper anymore without regard to the daily 
struggles the voters of Lake County have to 
endure. The Lake County Regional 
Planning Commission has again taken the 
first steps to let the voters know that their 
opinion means nothing. W.W. Grainger 
cleared its first major hurdle to move its 
headquarters to a Lake County country- 
side, thus paving the way for more conges- 
tion, pollution, traffic jams and ignorance 
to the rural atmosphere we in this area 
long to preserve. 

Mundclcin has just approved 800 new 
homes to be constructed despite the 
opposition of their voters. 

Arc you tired of the all too unnecessary 
developments occurring all over Lake 
County without regard to its many home- 
owners, many of whom reside here to 
enjoy the space about to be devoured by 
greedy developers? 

Are you tired of the exorbitant taxes 
added yearly to your property? Do you 
wish to be heard by the folks running your, 
county? Diana O'Keily and "Bobbie" 
O'Reilly are two sincere, honest candi- 
dates running for County Board in 
Districts 10 and 18. They arc forthright and 
strong in their ideas and have a keen ear 



for listening to the needs and wants of the 
people in Lake County. They both have an 
intense desire to give the voters back their 
voices and be heard again. They believe in 
saving the rural character that Is the nucle- 
us of Lake County. Vote March 15 for 
Diana O'Kcllyand "Bobbie" O'Reilly. . 

Christine Rawlings 
Mundclcin 

Brag loudly, carry 
a slick brochure 

Editor 

Recently, Lake County voters received 
a flier on conservation from Peter 
Fitzgerald, a Republican candidate for the. 
Eighth Congressional District. In this self- 
aggrandizing mailer, Mr. Fitzgerald, who 
has served one year in the state legislature, 
favorably compares his environmental 
record with that of President Theodore 
Roosevelt. After reading this piece, it, is 
glaringly apparent that the only thing larg- 
. er than Mr. Fitzgerald's ego is his belief 
that these slick brochures can fool the vot- 
ers of Lake County., It is a sad commentary 
that Mr. Fitzgerald has chosen to play barn 
yard politics with the electorate. 
Unfortunately for Mr. Fitzgerald, the vot- 
ers of Lake County will not be taken in by 
such gimmickry. 

Patrick McCloskey 
Lake Villa 

Government heeds 
Paulson 

Editor 

. Over the past two years, I have had the 

pleasure of serving on the Lake County 

Board of Health with Marty Paulson. 

'Marty has served as the president of the 

board and done a truly remarkable job. 

The Health Department had been an 
arm of county government that had gotten 
out of control both from a financial stand- 
point and with respect to its role in the 
community. Fortunately, Marty Paulson 
led the crusade to reform the Health" 
Department. He instituted a new attitude 
of cooperation with local and county lead- 
ers and the public. He worked to shore up 
a desperate financial situation by treating 
the operation as a business and creating a 
five year cash management plan. - 

His opponent was on the Board of 



Health just prior to Marty arriving on the 
board and left under a cloud of turmoil 
and financial mismanagement. 

What government needs today Is 
more people like Marty Paulson, willing to 
stick their neck on the line and do the job. 
If the people of your district give Marty tlic 
chance to be your representative, you will 
not be disappointed. He will do the things 
you would do in government if you were 
there. Support him on March 15. 

' JeanVclga, R.N. 
Gurnce 

O'Reilly is a 
tough lady 

Editor; 

An interesting thing happened to me 
this past week. Roberta. "Bobbie" O'Reilly, 
one of the candidates for county board 
from my area (district 18 In southern Lake 
County) personally stopped by my home 
to tell me she was running and gave me 
. some information. 

I quickly decided that Bobbie O'Reilly 
is my kind of person. It wasn't just because 
of her campaign literature or what she had ' 
to say, It was because it was about zero 
degrees outside, a foot or two of snow on 
the ground and ice everywhere, all sorts of 
difficult impediments. Yet, there she was, 
trudging through it all to find out about 
my concerns. Bobbie O'Reilly has got to be 
one tough lady and that's why I've decided 
to be sure to vote for her. I hope everyone 
else votes for Bobbie O' Reiily too. 

Susan Heimerle 
Forest Lake 

Fields turns his 
back on supporters 

Editor 

' A white back over 3,300 people in 
Antioch and Antioch Township voted 
against river bo at gambling. Mr. Fields 
who is supposed to represent his voters. 
turned his back on them and voted for his 
own selfish interest. Judy Martini was the 
..only one, who stood jup^and backed the 
p'cople who didn't approve 1 of rtverboat 
gambling. Anybody with common sense 
should know the location was the worst 
place in Lake County. 

I hope the people get out and vote for 
Judy Martini who supported their wishes. 

Frank Walsh, Sr. 
Antioch 



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From page B 13 

dards by our staff, custody refer- 
rals to juvenile detention 
increased over 103 percent 
between 1990 and 1993. Overall 
delinquency petitions increased 
a staggering 200 percent between 
1988 and 1992. 

Towers Paren Consultants has 
recommended a plan of improve- 
ment The Juvenile Detention 
Center operates 24 hours per day, 

'365 days per year. As in the Hulsc 
Detention Center, round-the- 
clock custodial care will be pro- 
vided to high risk youth who are 
in need of secure detention ser- 
vices. 

The 36 bed capacity is recom- 
mended in order to meet current 
and projected needs. The physi- 
cal design of. the building will 
provide for expansion as future 
demands may dictate. The new 
building would include individ- 

' ual sleeping rooms for youth; day 
space or general living areas; 
school classrooms; recreational 
space; a visitor's room; counsel- 
ing offices; and general offices for 
staff. These items are needed to 
meet the standards set forth by 
the Illinois Dcpt. -of Corrections, 
the National Juvenile Detention 
Assn., and ' the American 
Correctional Assn. 

With the design of a new 36 
bed. detention center to accom- 
modate pre- and post-disposi- 
tion need, a creative modification 
of the current Hulse Detention 
Center building has been 
devised. This proposal would 
convert existing, secure deten- 
tion space into a 22 bed military 
style residential treatment pro- 
gram and non-secure detention 
space into a day treatment pro- 
gram which could service a 
capacity of 12 male and female 

^juvenile offenders. 
- .The Structured Military and 
Residential Treatment or Smart 
program, would be 12 weeks in 
duration and creatively blend 

. military regimen, strenuous exer- 
cise, education, treatment and 
public service. Target population 
for the Smart Program will be 
male, juvenile offenders, 13 to 16 
years of age. 

The Smart Program would 
operate seven days per week. 
Military regiment and structured 
physical exercise would begin 
early each day. To meet state 
educational requirements, Smart 
residents would attend on-site 
school from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., 
Monday through Friday. 
Afternoon and early evening 
hours would be devoted to indi- 
vidual, group and family treat- 
ment sessions. 

Voters will be asked in the 
March 15 election to approve a 
question to raise the present tax 
cap to 8.7 percent, an increase of 
5.8 percent It has becivcstimatcd 
that approval of the referendum 
would raise the property taxes on 
a house with a market value of 
$150,000 in the county by 
approximately $1 per month, 

I am personally urging the cit- 
izens of Gurncc and Lake County 
to vote for approval of this very 
important referendum. If one 
child can be saved from a life of 
crime for around $12 a year, I am 
sure that you will agree with me 
that this is money well spent 
Editor's note: John H. Ward is 

: Chief of Police of Gurnee and 
President of the Lake County 
Chiefs of Police Assn. 



Lake County's top office holders and 
officials enthusiastically support and 

Endorse 

Sheriff Clint Grinnel for Re-election 

State Senator 

ADELINE J. GEO-KARIS 

"Clint Grinned has proven he has the experience, 
administrative ability and the integrity necessary to run a 
top notch Sheriff's department." 

State Senator 

WILLIAM E. PETERSON 

"There has never been a scandal or any breakdown in 
performance since Grinnell has managed the Sheriff's 
department" 

State Representative 

ROBERT W. CHURCHILL 

"Lake County needs four more years of Sheriff Grinnell 's 
experience, integrity and professionalism. We are fortunate 
to have him as Lake County's 'top cop'." 

State Representative 

VERNA L. CLAYTON 

"Clint is not a talker or a politician. He is a doer who has 
quietly done his job with excellence." 

State Representative 

ANDREA MOORE 

"Just look at the crime rate - down 12.7%. Grinnell has 
done an excellent job!" 

Lake County State 's Attorney 

MICHAEL WALLER 

"Grinnell is the candidate capable of providing the skill, 
judgment and effectiveness necessary to run the County's 
largest law enforcement office." 

Lake County Court Clerk 

SALLY D. COFFELT 

"Sheriff Grinnel has taken the initiative to establish 
programs that will benefit all the citizens of Lake County." 

Lake County Treasurer 

JACK "RED" ANDERSON 

"Sheriff Clint Grinnell is the best choice for Lake County 
Republicans. I strongly endorse his re-election." 

Lake County Recorder of Deeds 

FRANK NUSTRA 

"His honesty, integrity and experience are unsurpassed!" 
Lake County Regional Superintendent of Schools 

EDWARD GONWA 

"Clint is a quiet and hard-hitting law enforcement officer." 

Former United States Attorney for the Northern District 
of Illinois and former Lake County State's Attorney 

FRED FOREMAN 

"Honesty and integrity are not just words - they are a way 
of life for Clint Grinnell." 



RE-ELECT CLINTON 







VOTE REPUBLICAN 




\mm 




A PROVEN PROFESSIONAL 



0* 



OUrens lo Re-Elect Sherill Clint Grinnell, Marly WelUman. Treaiuier. 311 Washington Sweat. Wauhefan, l» lno " MOBS. 
A copy ot our report It or will be available lor Inspection at me Lake County Cleiki OKico. IB North County Street in Wnukegon. Illinois C0O8S 




m i nm wi m i 



H lJ»fc«. » 'l »!.•■ 



«aWiiftrt«rum-iV*vrg--^--?U.- 










1 LAKELIFE LAkclANd NEWSpApERS MARch 11, 1994 



-■.-.fi 



Sons of Bix Band to appear at A Tribute to Bix, Part V 



CLAUDIA M. LENART 
Regional Editor 

The dream continues this 
weekend with A Tribute to Bix 
Bicdcrbcckc, Part V, at UatTacili's 
Italian Cafe, Routes 21 and 137, in 
Libcrtyvillc. 

Bix aficionado Phil 

Pqpsychala has been bringing the 
annual festival to Lake County for 
five years now and each year it 
gets better. 

For those unacquainted, Bix 
Bicdcrbcckc, 1903-1931, was a 
master jazz cornctist born in 
Davenport, Iowa. Bix had a local 
connection; he attended Lake 
Forest Academy for awhile. The 
academy still bears a plaque in 
his memory. 

The legendary Bix 



Bicdcrbcckc grew to wide spread 
prominence In the 1920s after lis- 
tening to New Orleans musicians 
performing in Chicago and on the 
Mississippi River. Me developed a 
unique style of cornet playing 
with .clear, tempered, "bell-like" 
tones and phrasihgs of a haunt- 
ing, yet hot quality. Bix recorded 
on major labels, led several jazz 
bands and was a feature soloist 
with Frank Trumbaucr and Paul 
Whitcman. 

A Tribute to Bix runs Friday, 
March 11, through Sunday, March 
13, and includes a mixed offering 
for jazz enthusiasts including doc- 
umentaries, record show, con- 
tests, lectures and concerts. 

Featured performances arc 
on Saturday at p.m. and Sunday 



at 1 p.m. with the Sons of Bix 
Band, who made their last 
appearance at the Tribute five 
years ago. The Sons of Bix arc a 
unique jazz band based on the 
style of the best of Chicago and 
New York jazz of the 1920s and 
1930s. The band Is made up of 
some of the country's top musi- 
cians who come together to 
become the Sons of Bix Band. 

Don Gibson, piano and 
arranger, helped organize the 
Sons of Bix Band in the mid 70s 
after recognizing a need to carry 
on the Bix sound. Many Sons of 
Bix musicians have direct roots to 
the Bix era. Trombonist Don 
Ingle's father, Red Ingle, played 
with Bix in the Gene Coldkette 
Sec BIX page B20 




Sons of Bix Band 



LAKELIFE 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



A 



-RevIew 

'A Man For All Seasons' inspiring for any time 





"A Man For All Seasons" runs at Bowen Park Theatre throughout 
March. Left, Patrick Kerr as Sir Thomas More and Jackie Shadlngor 
as Alice More. Above, Kerr and Ron Scott Fry as the Common 
Man. For reservations, call 360-4741. 



CLAUDIA M. LENART 



•K. 



Regional Editor 

Bowen Park Artistic Director 
Mark Heller first saw 'A Man for 
All Seasons' when he was a stu- 
dent at Evanston High School. He 
said he was awed by the play and 
later in life wondered why more 
theater companies didn't per- 
form the play. He assumed it was 
because it provides so many chal- 
lenges, especially in terms of act- 
ing. 

Heller and Bowen Park defi- 
nitely overcame any obstacles 
and can add another winner to 
their list of productions with "A 
Man for All Seasons." Superb and 
nearly flawless acting makes this 
drama a standout 

'A Man for All, Seasons" tells 
the moral struggle of Sir Thomas 
More (Saint Thomas More), Lord 
Chancellor of England, under 
Henry VII I. The a ward- winning 
drama written by Robert Bolt is 



based on the historical events 
which led to England separating 
from the Pope and creating the 
Church .of England. It was first 
staged in 1960. ■ 

Before the split, Sir Thomas 
More, regarded as a man of the 
truth, was being pressured to 
accept King Henry's divorce from 
Queen Catherine so he could 
many Ann Bolcyn. Although a 
moral dilemma centering on 
divorce may at first seem far 
removed from our times, the con- 
flict doesn't focus on the divorce. 
The play centers around Sir 
Thomas Morc's struggle for self 
preservation amidst his determi- 
nation to be true to his deepest 
principles. 

Patrick Kerr brings Sir 
Thomas More to life with an 
impressive performance. Kerr, of 
Antioch, was previously seen at 
Bowen Park as Foxwell I. Sly in 
"Sty Fox," as well as Walter B 



in "The Front Page." Kerr teaches 
drama/theater at Gray slake 
Middle School. 

Playwright Bolt said he want- 
ed to show Sir Thomas More as a 
man who had a great capacity for 
life (not your usual martyr), but 
also a person who has an unyield- 
ing sense of self. Bolt also aimed 
to show a man who was a scholar 
as well as a success, and a man 
who enjoyed his success. Kerr is 
persuading as he shows the audi- 
ence the many sides of Sir 
Thomas More. 

Another fine performance is 
given by Ron Scot Fry of Kenosha 
as The Common Man. Fry, who is 
the Artistic Director of the 
Midwest Children's Theatre and 
the Bristol Renaissance Faire, 
provides comic relief as he takes 
on a variety^oi-dlaracters from 
More's steward Matthew to the 
boatman. His final roll is the exe- 
cutioner. Bolt said he used 



"Common" because he intended 
to have the audience identify to a 
degree with the character, whose 
basic instincts arc self-interest 
and self-preservation, Indeed, 
the audience automatically 
warms up to Fry's character. 

While More represents what 
we could be, the Common Man 
represents what we most often 
arc. 

Jackie Shadingcr as Lady Alice 
More is especially effective in a 
poignant jail scene in which she 
and Sir Thomas More say good- 
bye when it is clear that his exe- 
cution is inevitable. 

The staging in "A Man for All 
Seasons" is not as elaborate as 
some of Bowen Park's previous 
shows, but it is extremely effec- 
tive due to a backdrop and cre- 
ative lighting that changes mood 
through the various scenes, The 
set and lighting were designed by 
James Neal, technical director for 



Bowen Park Theatre and a the- 
ater teacher at Viking Junior High 
School in Gurnec and the Jack 
Benny Center for the Arts in 
Waukcgan. 

The story of Sir Thomas More 
may at first seem far removed 
from our present lives, yet "A 
Man for All Seasons" is a thought- 
provoking production which can 
provide inspiration during any 
time. 

"A Man for All Seasons" runs 
through March, Fridays and 
Saturdays at 8 p.m. There is a 3 
p.m. Sunday matinee on March 
20 and a 7:30 p.m. performance 
on Thursday, March 24. 
Performances are in Goodfelllow 
Hall at the Jack Benny Center, 
Bowen Park, 39 Jack Benny Drive, 
Waukcgan Tickets are $12/$10. 
Group rates are available. Call 
360-4741 for information or 
reservations. 





«■**: 



*•• ' i r ' •i"inl""ii-if' «\'mat*'\" 



M*»ch 11, 1994 UklANd Newspapers LAKE LIFE [ ^fl. 



F.Y.I. 



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11 



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line dancing 

Start out the new year on 
the right foot, learn to coun- 
try line dance. Hawthorne 
Lakes. Retirement Corn-, 
muntty will host country line • 
dancing classes twice a 
month. The classes will be 
free of charge and open to the 
public. Dance instructor 
"Cowboy" Bcrnle Small will 
conduct classes at Hawthorn 
Lakes Retirement Commun- 
ity at 1 p.m. on March 20. In 
addition, practice sessions 
will take place at 1 p.m. on 
March 27. Dancers of all levels arc 
Invited to participate in these classes. 
To register, call 367-0166. 

Drawn to art 

The David Adtcr Cultural 
Center, 1700 N. Milwaukee 
Ave. in Libertyvillc Is having 
an exhibition "Drawn to Art 
March 12. Artists 
are Hillary 
Abuhovc, lane Flschbach, 
Laura Wclti-Fruehan, Lfnnca 
Lahlum, Sara Schcrbcrg. 



Landscaping 

Photographer Robin J. 
Brown's exhibit "The 
Sustaining Landscape" is at 
the Chicago Botanic Garden 
until April 24. The black and white 
photographs offer a retrospective of 
the artist's work spanning two 
decades. They cafi be seen in the 
North Gallery of the Garden's 
Education Center. The Chicago 
Botanic Garden is a 300 -acre living 
museum, owned by the Forest 
Preserve of Cook County and man- 
aged by the Chicago Horticultural 
Society. It is located on Lake-Cook 
Road in Glencoc. Admission is free; 

S larking is $4 per car. Call 835-6213 for 
urlhcr information. 

Gallery exhibit 

The Suburban Fine Arts Center in 
Highland Park will be hosting a multi- 
media exhibit featuring the work of 
artists who address certain experi- 
ences of women in our culture from 



now until March 29. For more Infor- 
mation call 432-1B88. 

Watercolor festival 

The Anderson Arts Center 
announces the opening of the "Spring 
Festival of Wate^coIo^ ,, Invitational 
Show. There is no admission charge, 
The works will be exhibited through 
April 24. The Arts Center hours arc 
Thursday through Sunday from 1 to 5 
p.m. For more information call 653- 
0481. 

Well known artist 

Thomas Trausch, well known artist 
from Woodstock will be the guest 
artist at a combined special art pro- 
gram hosted by the Lake County Art 
League and the Kenosha Art 
Association on Sunday, March 20 
from 1:30 to 4:30 p.m. at Redeemer 
Lutheran Church, 620 Grove Ave., 
Waukcgan. For more information call 
662-2617. 

Sacred and Profane 

The Suburban Fine Arts Center will 
be hosting "Sacred and Profane" an 
exhibit of paintings by Illinois artists 
Laurence Conn, Beverly Kcdzlbr, 
Christine O'Connor, lack Olson, 
Andrea Rountree and Michelle Stone. 
The exhibit opens April 1 through 29. 
For more information call 432-1888. 



'Bells are Ringing' 

Best Off Broadway Players, 
Inc. a community theatre 
based in Palatine is present- 
ing "Bells are Ringing" by 
Betty Comdcn and Adolph 
Green. Last performances will 
he on March 11 and 12 at 
Cutting Hall, 150 E. Wood, 
Palatine. Time are Fridays 
and Saturdays at 8 p.m. and 
on Sundays at 2:30 p.m. 
Tickets arc $10 for adults and 
$6 for seniors and students. 
For more information call 
438-2556. 



1 GURNEE 
>ARK DISTRICT 



Sponsored in part by: 




'South Pacific* 

The classic "South Pacific" will be 
performed March 11 at 8 p.m., March 



VIKING PARK SINGERS 



TALIAH, 

5«_F ♦■• E •♦ S ■♦ T 
rm ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ i 

Friday, March 11, 4:30 - 8 pm 

Viking Park Dance Hall 

4374 Grand Ave., Gurnee 



Tickets available at: Gurncc Park District. Viking Park. 
437-1 Grand Avenue OH at the door. 



Hawaii's valley of paradise 

by JIM WARN KEN , PRESIDENT 
NORTH STAR TRAVEL, INC. 

Would you like to find a'lush tropical valley where oranges grow to the 
size of grapefruits, where avocados grow wild, where orchids are as 
common as weeds? Where is this land of Paradise? 

It's known as Waipio Valley, and you'll find it on the Island of Hawaii, 
the largest island in the Hawaiian chain. (The "big" Island.) 

More specifically, it's on the northeast coast of the island at the end of 
Route 24. There you'll come to a lookout point where you can see down 
into the valley. You have a choice here. You can either hike down the 
very steep dirt road into the valley or take the 'Waipio Valley Shuttle". 

The shuttle is actually a jeep ride you'll long remember. For $15, your 
guide will take you down an awesome looking road for an hour-and-a- 
half tour of the valley. If you're lucky enough to get David for a guide, 
you'll also learn of the many legends about the Hawaiian royalty, said to 
be buried in the valley. David's tours usually stretch into two to three 
hours. 

David was born here. At one time, there were over 4,000 people living 
in the valley. Now, his father is one of its few residents. 

You will visit a black sand beach at the mouth of the valley. Then, ride 
up-river to the 1 ,000-foot Hiilawe Falls. You'll find plants found nowhere 
else but in this valley, one of which wilts immediately if touched by a 
human hand. In the river itself is found a type of freshwater shrimp, again 
very rare. Wild fruit and flowers abound everywhere! David is very good 
at making a football helmet out of grapefruit skins for the kids. He'll also 
see that you leave the valley with enough witd fruit to feed you the rest 
of your stay in Hawaii. 
, Reservations would be a good Idea. In Hawaii call David at 775-7121 . 



anmmsm/r maun mc. 



2234 E. Grand Llndenhurst, III. 
24 Hr. Recorded Bargains - 356-2000 

(708)356-3010 



K * 



MMBH 



12 at 4 and 8 p.m., March 13 at 2 p.m. 
at the Multiplex Athletic Club In 
Dccrficld. Call (312)528-9668. 

Stage Two Theatre 

. "Sunday, 'Sunday," a play by 
Sandra Ashcr, portrays realistic treat- 
ment of life In a psychiatric ward. 
Performances arc. Friday and 
Saturdays at 8 p.m. at Stage- Two 
Theatre, 12 N. Sheridan ltd., 
Waukcgan. "Foxtalcs," an adaptation 
of Aesop's fables that follows the sto- 
ries or the fox will run April 28 to May 
7 at Stage Two. For more Information 
for cither show call 662-7088. 

The Goodbye Girl' 

Marriott's Lincolnshire Theatre 
presents Neil Simon's "The Goodbye 
Girl," playing through April 3 on 
Wednesdays from 2 to 8 p.m.; 
Thursdays at 8 p.m., Fridays at 8 p.m.; 
Saturdays at 5:30 and 9 p.m.; Sundays 
at 2:30 and 7 p.m. Ticket prices for all 
performances arc $32.50. For further 
Information call 634-0200. 

'My Funny Valentine' 

*My Funny Valentine" a 
music/comedy revue; directed by 
lames Romencsko will be presented 
through March 15 at Apple Holler 
Restaurant Showplace, 5006 S. 
Sylvanla Ave., Sturtcvant, Wis. The 
show will be presented cabaret style 
in the Red Bam Theatre. Tickets arc 
$24 and Include wine and cider tast- 
ing, special luncheon or dinner and 
the show. For more information call 
(414)886-8500. 

'Man for all Seasons' 

The Dowcn Park Theatre Company 
will present Robert Bolt's classic play 
"A Man for all Seasons" on March 11, 
12, 18, 19, 25 and 26 at 8 p.m. in 
Goodfcllow Hall, Bowen Park, In 
Waukcgan. Tickets arc $12 and $10. 
For more Information call 360-4741. 

'No Sex Please* 





Rick Lawrence as Needam Is 
treated to tome special "steep 
therpy" by Reggie Reynolds 
and Debbie Bono. 

Andre's Steakhouse and Rosebud 
Production In Richmond are set to 
open the funny farce, "No Sex Please, 
We're British," Play dates are March 
11, 12, 13, 18, 19, 20, 25, and 26. Call 
(815) 678-2671 for more information. 

'The Wizard of Aids' 

On Tuesday, April 12 at 3 p.m. 
Barat College will be hosting the 
' Healthworks Theatre presentation of 
"The Wizard of Aids." The presenta- 
tion is an innovative musical pro- 
gram which alms to teach Its audi- 
ence about the prevention of HIV and 
AIDS. For more information call 615- 
5090. 



'Beauty and the Beast' 

The Waukcgan Community 
Players present "Beauty and the 
Beast," Saturday, March 19 at 3 and 8 
p.m. and Sunday, March 20 at 3 p.m. 
Performances will be at the Mel ba 
Wlxom Theatre of Waukcgan East 
High School. Tickets arc $3 for all per- 
formances and arc available at the 
door. For more Information call 662- 
0181. 

'Exit the Body* auditions 

The Waukegan" Community 
Players will hold auditions Sunday 
and Monday, March 20 and 21 for a 
production of the play, "Exit the 
Body." Auditions begin at 7:30 p.m. 
Sunday and Monday at Roscnwald 
Cottage in Bowen Park Waukegan. 
For more information call 662-0181. . 






Music and ballet 

The . McHenry County 
Youth Orchestras will join the 
Svatander Dance Company 
for an evening of music and 
ballet on March 12 at Temple 
Chal on Arlington Heights 
Road and Checker Road in 
Long Grove. The concert will 
begin at 8 p.m. Tickets arc $10 
and are available by phoning 
the office at (815)356-6296. 



SeeLAKEUFEB20 



Family program presents Amelia Earhart 



What's Happening? 

Lakeland 
Newspapers is look- 
ing for items to be 
listed each week in 
our Community 
Calendar feature. 
Items such as club 
and organization 
meetings, church 
socials, announce- 
ments, special 
events, etc. Send 
items to Nancy 
Rasmus, Lakeland 
Newspapers, 30 S. 

Whitney St., 
Grayslake, IL 60030. 



The courageous life of Amelia 
Earhart, the pioneer aviator and 
the first women to cross the 
Atlantic in an airplane, will be 
presented in a dramatized family 
entertainment program at 7:30 
p.m. Thursday, March 17 at the 
College of Lake County auditori- 
um, 19351 W. Washington St., 
Grayslake. The program will 
examine the complex workings of 
Amelia, Earhart's , personality 
while capturing the mystery and 
intrigue surrounding her unex- 
plained disappearance over the 
Pacific 



The show will be performed by 
three members of the Ohio-based 
ArtReach Touring Theatre group. 
Amelia Earhart will be portrayed 
by Theresa Lamm, her husband 
George Putnam will be played by 
Glenn Hurst and a reporter will 
be characterized by Teresa 
Strasser. 

The program is suited for adults 
and children in intermediate 
grades. 

Tickets are $5 general admission 
and $3 for children and CLC stu- 
dents and alumni. Call 223-6601, 
ext 2300 for tickets. 



MESJJMM 


Gurnee Park District 


HSRB 




SPRING 


Mmm 


CRAFT FAIRE 


Itll 


27 Area artists & crafters! 


IVI ll/ifl 


Fin. M.\h\ 18 Noox-7 


i 




Sm: Mm;. 19 9-5 






4374 Grand Ave.. Gurnee 


k v\ >/ j HI 


(708)623-7788 



Tin* ffiiikt* of IVolVssioiuil Polite 



THE PROBLEM: 

The current administration has lost the trust of its own officers through 
lack of leadership and failed management techniques. 

THE SOLUTION: 

Elect Ed Sindles 

• unanimously endorsed by the Lake County Sheriffs Fraternal Order 
of Police 

• unanimously endorsed by the Waukegan Fraternal Order of Police 

• unanimously endorsed by the Liberty vi He Fraternal Order of Police 

• Bachelor's and Master's degrees in Administration of Criminal Justice 
from University of Illinois 

• 28 years of professional law enforcement experience 

• 1 8 years as an instructor of law enforcement at College of Lake 
County, three years at the Police Training Institute 




2SINDLES 

FULL-TIME -FULL TERM 




■J# 



;V 




PMtMM ".Jj'j . . •. 



. ,- *,-•*-• ■*— <•'•»•» 



-.:l- - 




JH LAKELIFE UkelANtl Nr.ws|MpcK<; M**ch 11, 1994 



l 'kC^ 



•</ 



From page B 19 

Jazz/Wind Ensembles 

The College or Lake County jazz 
and Wind Ensembles will present 
their seventeenth annual Guest Artist 
Concert on Sunday, March 13 at 7r30 
p.m. in the college auditorium. 
Admission Is $4 for adults and $2 for 
students. Jazz great, Bill Watrous and 
tuba professor, Harvey Phillips will 
perform with the group. For more 
information call 223-6601, cxL 2300. 

Lake Forest Symphony 

On March IB and 19 the Lake 
Forest Symphony under the direction 
of Maestro McRac will feature violin- 
ist, Pamela Frank. Performances 
begin at a p.m. in Rhoadcs 
Auditorium, Finch University of 
Health Sciences/The Chicago 
Medical School, North Chicago. 
Single tickets arc $26 preferred and 
$20 peripheral per person. For more 
Information call 295-2135. 

Art Evaluation/Opera 

The Board of Directors of the 
Barrington Chapter of Lyric Opera of 
Chicago Invited members and guests 
for their "Art Evaluation and Opera" 
program and luncheon at 1 p.m. on 
March 11 at Something Special locat- 
ed at 228 James St in Barrington. 
Members arc S15. Guests S20. 
Reservations arc limited and close 
March 4. Call 358-9080 for more 
information. 

Pops concert 

Lakes Area Community Band will 
hold a Pops Concert on Sunday, 
March 20 at 7 p.m. at Maravcla's 
Restaurant. Tickets arc $10 adults at 
the door, or discounted to $8 advance 
purchase. Students under 12 years arc 
. $6. Call 395-5566 for more informa- 
tion. 

String Quartet 

The College of Lake County pre- 
sents The Lawrence University String 
Quartet with pianist Carol Leyboum 
on Saturday, March 19 at 7:30 p.m. at 
CLC Auditorium. Admission Is free. 





— 



Poetry workshop 

Award winning poet, Sandra Frank-Moscnson, will teach a four week 
poetry workshop, "She Who Holds Her Wise Blood" on Thursday, March 
17, 24, April 7. and 14 from 7 to 9:30 p.m. at the Suburban Fine Arts Center, 
777 Central, Highland Park. The workshop will teach self-expression. For 
more Information call 432-1888. 

Food drive 

The Lake County Resource Council Is having Its yearly food drive from 
March 12 to 18. All the food and funds collected for the drive will be kept In 
Lake County and used by local soup kitchens and food pantries to re-stock 
their low supplies. Food will be collected in many areas of the county by 
Boy Scouts in special grocery bags hung on door knobs on March 12 and 
collected on March 19. For more information call 945-6170 or 662-1230. 

Bowl for kids sake k 

Big Brothers/Big Sisters of Lake County's annual bowling parly plans 
arc underway, Jttst'collccl at least $50 in pledges. Every bowler will receive 
an event T-shirt. A Corporate Challenge Day will be held April 17 at 
Brunswich Dccrbrook Lanes with sessions starting at noon. For more infor- 
mation call 360-0770. 

Annual auction for Leukemia research 

The Wolff-Bcrgcr Chapter of the Leukemia Research Foundation will 
host its 15th annual auction on Saturday, March 19 starting at 6 pm. at the 
Holiday Inn, 5300 W. Touhy Ave., Skokle. Most items arc new and will 



Include Bulls tickets, hotel weekends, restaurant packages, jewelry, artwork, 
antiques and autographed memorabilia. Auction proceeds benefit leukemia 
research, support groups, client/family counseling and financial aid for 
medical needs. For more Information call Jeff Kolodny at (312)545-6160. 

The sap is running 

The sugar maples have already been tapped at Rycrsoh Woods near , 
Deerflcld and reservations arc now being accepted for the annual "Maple 
Syruping* programs. These programs begin every 30 minutes from 1 to 3 
p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays in March. All ages are Invited. Reservations 
arc recommended. The fee Is $3 per person. ($2 for Lake County residents.} 
For more Information call 948-7750. 

Volo Bog 

Red-winged blackbirds, fern fiddlchcads and a warm southerly breeze 
will accent the spring bog tours. No reservations are required for Individu- 
als and small groups. Groups of ten or more phone (815)344-1294 for spe- 
cial arrangements. All ages welcome, minimum age five recommended. A 
Guided Bird Walk will be Saturday, March 12 at 9 a.m. Bring binoculars and 
field guides if you have them. Keep track of your sightings on the site's 
"Checklist of Birds." Ages 7 to adult arc welcome. Phone (815)344-1294 for 
reservations. 

St. Pats Party 

The biggest St. Pat's party will be Thursday, March 17 from 1 to 11 p.m. 
at the Chicago Hilton and Towers in Chicago. Admission is $5. 



Spring hoedown at Grayslake Riv 



An old time barn dance, the 
"Spring Hoedown" will be held at 
7:30 p.m. Saturday, March 12 at 
the Park District Building, 42 S. 
Seymour in downtown Grayslake. 

This is the fifth in the current 
scries of traditional barn dances 
presented by the Grayslake 
Community ParkDlst. Barn danc- 
ing differs from modern "main- 
stream" and "plus" square danc- 
ing in that there is always live 
music and the dances arc tradi- 
tional. Costume is not important. 

The old time dances arc called 
by "Uncle" Roy Reinholds, with 
live music by Ron Brown on fiddle 



and wife Sandy on guitar. 

All age groups, with or without 
partners or square dancing expe- 
rience, arc invited to attend the 
barn dance. When needed, the 
old time figures will be walked 
through before dancing. In addi- 
tion, just before the dance, at 7 
p.m., free lessons will be held. 
Come to the dance and enjoy a 
folk tradition that people have 
enjoyed since the founding of our 
country. The. admission is $3 a 
person. 

For more information about 
barn dancing, call Reinholds at 
223-2081. 



From page Bl 
Orchestra. 

Lino Patruno & His Bix Sound, 
from Italy, will make their first 
U.S. appearance. Their sets fea- 
ture tuns Bix played hut did not 
record. 

Other special events include 
Ken Crawford presenting rare 
early jazz filmsat 8 p.m. on Friday. 
Jazz enthusiasts can test their 
skills on Saturday, at 1 p.m., in the 
$500 mystery record contest 

On Friday and Saturday, 10 
a.m. to 6 p.m., tables will be set up 
for a record show and dealers. 



There will also be showings of 
"Whitcman Moves to Columbia 
Records," a 1928 newsreel long 
considered lost. It features the 
only appearance of Bix standing 
and playing through an ensemble 
brass passage. 

A patron package for the 
entire weekend costs $53 and 
includes reserved concert seating. 
Cost for Friday, day, is $5; Friday 
night, $8; Saturday, day, $7; 
Saturday night, $20; Sunday, $20. 

For more information call thfcj 
Bix Hotline at 362-401 6. 




7-10 p.m 



- 1 




26228 N. Hwy. 83, Mundelein 



Wear Your Green and Come Celebrate Spring! 

Win A Trip To The Bahamas! 

• Sec The Bud Girls * Corned Beef & Cabbage 
* Green Beer * Drink Specials • Irish One Han Band * Bag Pipers 

• Win Prizes • Soda Bread 



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Match 11, 1994 ■ UkeUN(l Ne\wpA|)ERs LAKEUFt 




Where To 



Eat Out 



FEATURE 

or THE 

WEEK 






SGSW-"^ 



i : . STEAK PIT: 1 



(1 Mite Weil of GumM Mill) 
1818 N. Grandwood Drtw, Qumm, IL 



; i £ 356-5200 

"The Place Where You Can Watch the Chef Cook" 

FMTURIN6 THE FINEST STEAKS IN LAKE COUNTY 

iiWinmOfMSM 

DAILY ITEMS INCH [DE 

Colossal 32 oz. Steaks & Sirloin, Porterhouse 

Prime Rib 

Ribs • Pork Chops • Chicken 

Shish Kabobs • Surf & Turf Kabobs 

•Shrimp KaBobs •Chicken Kabobs 

Fresh Salad Bar 

Lobster Tail • Cod Fish • Mahi Mahi • Shrimp 
PLUS MUCH MORE 

NOW OPEN MONDAYS 

, Hours: 

1818 N. Grandwood Drive, *«JSxlfs£}£& P , m . 




. Gumee 

356-5200 



c< 






Award-winning food at 
the Backyard Steak Pit 

Sit back and relax In the cozy comfortable country 
atmosphere of the Backyard Steak Pit. Whether you have a taste 
for steaks or seafood, the chef will prepare your meal to order. 
With the huge number or choices, even the fussiest cater will be 
delighted. 

Begin your meal with one of the "Starting roundups." 
Topping the lineup Is the onion loaf, sliced onions deep-fried 
into a block, available as a half-order for two to three people, 
while the full loaf serves four to six. 

Co-owners Keith Scott and Mike Shannon are particularly 
particularly proud of both the steak and seafood entrees, and 
arc pleased to announce their new addition of grilled pork 
chops. J; 

'• H Wc specialize in steak and seafood," explains Scott. "We 
also have drink specials throughout the week." 
, All of their steaks arc grilled on an authentic charcoal 
briquette grill. They hand cut top choice of prime beer daily to 
assure freshness and quality, Steak dinners start at $10.95 and 
diners have a choice of Sirloin, Filet Mlgnon, New York Strip, T- 
bonc, or Ribcye. Dinners include baked potato, salad bar, Texas 
or garlic toast For a romantic evening, try the steak dinner for 
two. 

The Backyard Steak Pit has received the Pioneer Press award 
for the best steak and best prime rib in Lake County, and is 
known for their excellent service. 

Seafood lovers will be In paradise. The 10-ouncc cold water 
lobster tail served with drawn butter is fresh from ship to shore 
to you. The filet of cod fish is a. steamed loin cut served with, 
drawn butter. The menu also features red salmon filet, mahi 
mahi, and breaded shrimp. 

Other treats on the menu Include the corral combos: 
combinations of lobster and steak, shrimp and steak, ribs and 
chicken, or ribs and steak. For lighter fare, try one of the "grub 
on a slab" sandwiches served with French fries, dill pickle spear, 
and cole slaw. Priced from $4.95 to $5.95, the sandwiches are a 
real deal. 

Wind up your meal with a homemade dessert. A dessert tray 
with more than six tempting selections is offered to each table. 

The Backyard Steak Pit has banquet facilities available for 
parties up to 65 people. Party plans and packages are available. 

The restaurant Is open Monday through Thursday from 4 
p.m. to 10 p.m., on Fridays and Saturdays, from 4 to 1 1 p.m., and 
on Sundays from 1 to 9 p.m. It Is located on 1818 N. Grandwood 
Drive in Gurncc, just off Rte. 132. All menu items are available 
for carry out Call 356-5200 for more Information or for details 
on party plans. . 



GREAT ALL-AMERICAN FOOD & FUN 



THE j 

VILLAGE i 
TAVERN i 




ster 
Breakfast 

and 
Petting Zoot 

Caltfor 
Reservations 

(708) 

634-31171 



i°osNEW 
WEDNESDAY SPECIAL 

FROM 5 TO 10 PM _^ 

— ~~— fft25 

ALL YO U CAN EAT CHI CKEN only DJ 

served with fries, 
coleslaw & homemade bread 

Roger Pauly on Piano 

BRING THE WHOLE FAMILY 
HAVE A BALL AND CALL! 

(708) 634-31 17 For Reservatioiis 

Old McHenry Road ♦ Downtown Long Grove 



Potesta's 
|>Pizza •Pasta 



LOOK.. 
.irSBACK 



680-7777 623-0600 

f (Vernon Hills} (Gurnee) 

('all Mnmt Our SjH-cial l^irtv Paikagt-s • SiViritm fin 'joii 



$ 2°° OFF 

Large Pizza 
or Extra Large 

Lioi Ok Gxpta Fa Or Jet. 
Hcrt ViW W* Any 06a Spttuli Or Praoakm 
EXPIRES MAY 31. I9M L 



2 SMALL THIN CRUST 

CHEESE ft 

SAUSAGE PIZZAS 

$ 10.99 

LialOeeCacpaiPttCKfa. 
M* Valid wa Any OteSpri* Of 
EXUBESMAYit.IWI 



WE DELIVER 



(l.llllllnl Itrlivrjy) 



lOl Townllno R<l. 
Vernon Hills, IL&OOBI 



53-tO Grand Avo. 
Ciiniee. ll.fiOOn I 



Winter Dining Room 
Special! 

"Dine In A 50's Atmosphere" 

Large Pizza 

** $Q99 " Gar,ic Br6ad w/Cheese. 
'^ Pitcher of Pop 

•Dine-In 
•Cany Out 
•Delivery 

1408 Butterfiefd Ro&fcUVernon Hills 
of Rt. 60 & Butterfield Rd.-Butfwteld Comers Mall) 

367-8636 - 



(Comer 



Open 
Mon. Thru Sat. 



FAMily Restaurant is 

\ . ^ pROud TO llAVE DEEN 

■£ *v # ^.V^VY VOTEdAMONqiriEbEST 

■y*~*^ Come Find Out 



Open 6:00 AM-11:00 PM 7 Days A Week 



•Breakfast-Lunch-Dinner 
•Broiled Chops, Steaks 

•Fresh Seafood -Carry Out 
•Cocktails, Beer & Wine 



SENia^McNiJ 



♦-j'V.vJ ■**#?•(; 



Mon . tU ru Fri ¥Xi\*b 



1910 E.GnANd Ave, 

LJNdENrlURST 

556-4440 or 
556-4441 



.**# 




"Only the Best Since 1957" 



FamSy Dining in 
a Unique 

Northwoods 
Atmosphere 




Pizzas 

Sandwiches 
Munchlea 



sfcHfire 



«aw &pub 

Beer • Wine • Cocktails • Game Room • Complimentary Peanuts 

566-5380 

624 S. Lake St. (Comer of Rte. 45 & Diamond Lake Rd.) Mundelein 




BILL'S Delivery 

PIZZA SS& 





? top (5 "* ' 

Wam9awtMM r -; ■ •i^^-- v ' -. ■-, » 



LUNCH 
SPECIALS 

2:30 pm 
Friday 

New Salad 
Lovettr 



">*5Hr8.TlMS.-Sun. , 
'•^ 7am-2:30pm 

BateryOpen 

13 5 pm 
Moti-Cbsed 



COUNTRY 
RESTAURANT 

Bakery • Country Store • Greenhouse 




^ 



300S..Rto.Mm/< U.N. otMdotiim Rd.) 
MwdeMn, 1 L 60060 (708) 566-4S20 



Join us for 
BREAKFAST or LUNCH 



^ 



n 



TUSitt Mandarin 



Sunday Buffet - All You Can Eat 

Tg|r Serving 1 1:30 A.M. to 2:30 P.M. 

W Appetizer: Crabmeat w/Cheese, Paper Wrapped Chicken 
«&- Chicken Salad, Soup, Hot & Sour & Eggdrop ■ 



i£ 



Entree: • General T» Chicken 
Shrimp ir/Pineapple 
■ Beef w/Swet 4 Pungent Sim 
<Fkh FUetw/Chill Sauce 
•Chtten w/Biad Bean Sauce 
• Lemon Chidcen 



•Fried Mushroom 
•Shrimp Fried RJa 

• Gar-fMJue Pork Chcv Hein 

• Almond jelk). Fish Fmll, 
Tea 4 Fortune Cookia 



m 



Hr ^ iH $4 95 

4 E. Phillip Road (On Rt. 60, 1 mile W. of Milwaukee 
IB Vernon Hill* • 680-1760 






t->* 



under 12 



Ave.)" 




St. Patrick's Day Celebration 



The Biggest On The North Shore 



Corned Beef & Cabbage $ 5 



99 



Irish Stew, Green Beer, Bag Piper h Morel 
Bring Your Family And Friendi And Enjoy The Irish Spirit. 




i* 



•.__..- ••tt.".»i.nf.-.»-rti B 



..' ■-.- 



■ ■ 



J—'-— -^ - -j.~» . . i '-J-- »,iai mwxn 



...... .j.-.J'.-i-JJ™:* 



fB" 



««■» 



***.«. 




LAKEL1FE UkclANc) Newspapers MarcIi 11, 1994 



Come Join the Festivities 
as We Celebrate 

St. Pat's Day 

Thurs. - March 17 



c ar» 



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at 



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corn 1 m 



SP 



eG» 





RJ's Eatery 

*^ & Th« Outback Bar 

1013 E. Grand Ave.*Llndonhursl 
Phone 356-2300 

Op^iMoaFd II ' i.m.; 8*L-Svv 8 • m. 
DINE-1N4CARRY0UT ♦FREE DEUVERY 
OOU8LE DECK*THIN CRUST*PAN PIZZA 




._-*\. 



-«.! 



«^» 



RESTAURANT 


Enjoy Our 27 Item 

Salad Bar Alone 

Or Included With AH 

Our Dinners 


THURSDAY 

SNOW CRAB 

ALL YOU CAN EAT 
SALAD BAR 

*14» 


SUNDAY 

KtEAIQFAITWm 

ALL YOU CAN EAT 

8 A.M.- 1P.M. 

* 5 « 


• 


TUESDAY 

BROASTED 
CHICKEN 

ALL YOU CAN EAT 
SALAD BAR 

$C95 


FRIDAY FISH FRY 

ALL YOU CAN EAT 

*6.9S - *9.9S 


MON..FRI. ALL YOU CAN EAT 

HAM, EGG ft TOAST ■^J*"* 
*|* OR *1* 


< JLI 95? Ptoute"!? • / 
-"**- Open Daily Breakfast, 


Knt 
Lur 


loch -^v^ 
ich. Dinner "TCT 



.•Sr^f ???????????????????? t????^ 

lil THURSDAY £: 

liiii FAJITJl Fest! iij 

;:::: "Order Fajilas And Get A FREE Refill" 

pm !*• *No Sliaiing/Onc Per Cuslama. 



■•••I 



:::; SATURDAY & SUNDAYS 53 

S;::: Southwestern Breakfasts-Exciting Menu! 

••••■ (Served 7 ».m->2 p.m.> 



!•••• 



A tfot 

Place To 

Meet & Eat! 




••••4 



6.4CU 



SJ;:: sun.-Thu™. 481 Peterson Rd. :::;* 

•••-. t1.m-10p.in. Libertyville, IL 60048 :::;• 

••Xf, 7eJrn.-12a.rn.' 549-1972 ,#ff*« 



1 r- 7 ^ (Enmttrij Jiqutre 

Jlcsiaxir ant & pamjiict <3faciiittcs 

EARLY DINNERS 



Delightful and elegant service and food is 
always what is presented here ai The Country 
Squire Restaurant. Our early dinners include 
sou p or fresh fruit cup, spinach salad with a 
bacon dressing, or a tossed salad with your 
choice of dressing, choice of several entrees • 
your dinner also includes choice of potato and 
vegetable and dessert and beverage • 20 items 
to choose from plus our specials of the day! 



•rtrAwLV 




Gracious dining in the 
Wesley Scan Country Estate 

All major credit cards honored. 



|— ■ COUPON --1 

1 ONE FREE 1 
ENTREE 



Your hosts, Bill & Kris Govas 

(708) 223-0121 

Intersections Routes 120 & 45 , 

Grayslake, IL 

-CLOSED MONDAYS- 



With the purchase of another 
entree of equal or greater value. 



Limit one coupo 
1 Coupon Pc 



)on per visit. ■ 
>er table. 
Coupon not valid with any other I 
special or promotion. 



I 
I 



Dining Roam 
Only 

Expires 3/31/94 



^•COUPON --J 

223-7010 



The Oncjinal Stoic 



ITALIAN • AMEHICAH 
blNlUG 

Since 2 977 



On Rte. 83 

Just N. Of Rollins 

Round Lake Beach 




Where To 
Eat Out 



FEATURE 

or THE 

WEEK 




The McNulty Irish Dancers 

Gilmer Roadhouse, celebrates St Pats 

The Gilmer Roadhouse is the place lo bo on St. Patrick's Dayl 
The festivities begin at 1 1 a.m. with a menu thai includes corned beef 
and cabbage, Irish slew, and, of course, green beer. On the day when 
everybody is a little Irish, stop in to the Roadhouse for lunch, dinner, 
or just good company and great entertainment. 

Gilmer will be featuring the McNulty Irish Dancers on St. 
Patrick's Day. This delightful group of local young women will be 
competing in Dublin, Ireland in an international competition in April. 
The group, directed by Barbara McNulty, will be entertaining Gilmer 
customers beginning at 6 p.m. 

If salads arc your favorite, Gilmer has a huge selection of salads. 
Salads arc available in a small and large size, depending On your 
appetite. The anttpasto salad is just great along with the popular 
seafood salad. Plus, salads arc served with fresh baked bread. • 

The Roadhouse has one of the best appetizer selections in the 
county. The appetizer combo plate includes a sample of the best of 
the bunch with mushrooms, onion rings, zucchini, and mozzarclla 
sticks. The appetizer menu includes hot and spicy Buffalo wings, or 
you can make a whole meal of the pizza sticks. 

Warm up with one of the tempting homemade soups. Popular 
choices include Ihc minestrone on Tuesday and Saturday and the 
chicken noodle on Monday. Baked French onion is a regular feature. 

The. Gilmer Roadhouse has a brand new menu with old favorites 
and a few new delights. The house specialty is baby back ribs. 

"I've had people say to me they have been to places that 
specialize in rihs that don't compare to ours. Our special sauce is a 
medium sauce. It's not too sweet or loo bland, it's somewhere in 
between. They satisfy a wide array of appetites," said owner Dean 
Taggart. 

For lovers of Italian food, nothing beats the homemade lasagna 
or pizza, cither thin crust or pan. The pizza is made from scratch 
from the sauce right down to the crust and is sure to become a family 
favorite. 

On Fridays slop in for the all-you-can-cal fish fry, with a choice 
of cod or ocean perch or a mix of both for just $5.95. The price 
includes choice of potato, homemade soup (be sure and try the New 
England clam chowder) or salad and garlic bread. 

If it's a good burger you crave there is nothing better than 
sinking your teeth into a thick half-pound madc-to-order charbroilcd 
burger. There arc 10 varieties of burgers wilh a full range of 
garnishes, if you don'l sec a combination that appeals to you they 
will mix and match items for a one-of-a-kind taste sensation. 

Restaurant hours arc Monday through Thursday, 1 1 a.m. 
to 10:30 p.m., on Friday and Saturdays from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. and 
on Sundays from 8 a.m. to 9.30 p.m. 

Gilmer Roadhouse is located on the corner of Gilmer and 
Midlothian Roads. For carry out orders or for reservations call 438- 
0300. 



THE DEAN TAGGART FAMILY 



ct ti^ 




mm 



(Kilmer Stoat) 



iJJouiU* 



"Located in beautiful downtown Gilmer" 

438-0300 



r--o. 



FRIDAY 



■<■->;*'•. 






«A FAMILY 
RESTAURANT" 

OPEN 7 DAYS 

i 

Lunch & Dinner 

Breakfast on Sundays 

Children's Portions & Prices 

Gilmer & Midlothian Roads 
Mundelein, Illinois 60060 

* -3 %^ um£ ■-'•S 




"Something 
For Everyone! 



DAILY 



Monday 

All U Can Eat 
Crab Legs! 




Appetizers 

•Seafood* 

• Sandwiches 

•Homemade Soups* 

•Pastas • Mexican 

•Children's Menu 

•Plus So Much More! 

Hours: > 

Monday-Thursday 11 am.-10p.rn. 

Friday-Saturday 1 1 a,m.-l 0:30 p.m. 

Sunday 1 1 am. -9 p.m. 

S25 Rockland Road (Rte. 176} 
Lake Bluff - 295-7 1 4Q 




Rr.m urint .V Lounge 
S55 



Hogan's Preferred 

Card on Sale 

$350 Value 

for *X9™ 

(Golf and Dinner Specials) 

Dinner Specials St Pat's Day Dinner 

t^ rn $-4 A95 Thurs. March 17 

Prime Rib J. V Qq^^ Beef & Cabbage 

BBQRibs *9 95 ortambStew *5 95 

All You Can Eat Pasta Bar *7 95 w/Salad Bar *i? s 

Banquets Available 10-300 People 

Burner Fri. & Sat. 5-10 p.m. 

Sun. Brunch 10-2 p.m. 

Call (708) 395-4800 

40 150 N. Rte. 59, Antioch, Open to the Public 




Restaurant! & Lounge 

FRESH SEAFOOD &MSIA 



HI \ USE II Sill OK DIWIK V\l) 

Kit i i \ i six o\i> 1. 1 \cii ok diwk 



1 I'KK K Ol IOI \I OK I I SSI.K \ Ml 1 

1 1 ■-, [ : . I i ■' ; I 'M \|<lll I J| M I 1 iMI I t * * II t l M 1 I | HI U |H I * II 1 * I H III! I 



^ 



476 liberty <Rt. 1 76), Wauconda 

526-0606 



Always Good Food At 

White Alps Restaunant 

572 W. Main • Lake Zurich - 438-7005 


BREAKFAST SPECIALS 


DINNER SPECIALS 1 1 


2 EfifiS w/Ham Off Specialty of the House: 
The Bone, Bacon $-% 4 S ™« «*"?*• 
& Sausage Link •> 6 

PIUS 1 1 OmeiCttCS To From The Droller Steaks A Chops 

Choose. Waffles, Pancake Frcsh Bonclcss & SkinIess Seatood f 
& French Toasi "*™ ,, *SlSStS* 11 ** 


LUNCH SPECIALS 


COCKTAILS 


i Daily Specials „ s .... $*|75 
Deluxe Sandwiches Beer & Wine 1 

Al^ndcr Mixed Drinks $ 2°° 
9 Call Drinks *Z 



^- ^" 111 * 



_i ! ■ - ' 



r -.,.. r »»»- in7 ». < ^-..-j l , . , ^ . in i'M"7 A Un^v < m tmt^ ^V' it mwsiSUDt& j 'tj^^ vMiCi. 



- _ ' - .» ;-'"*;♦-'.* ----■-■ . 

iti i' i m Vn ' ii« 7V» i ' ij . 'iim i I, ■ * — .— 



ti&~-- 



M*«ch 11, 1994 UktlANd NcwspApERS LIPSERVICE 




t 



( 






ACROSS 

1. Moss or Mary 
5. French painter 
8. Wife of Siva 

12. Eastern nanny 

13. Classic car 

14. School social 
event 

15. Plucky quality 

17. Sloping 
roadway 

18. Extinct bird 

19. Pianist Jose 
21. "Unsafe at 

Any— M 

24. Shock deeply 

25. Covers 

26. Legitimate prey 
30.- Actress Hagen 

31. Wise lawmaker 

32. Drilling 
' equipment 

33. Long-range 
strategy 

35. Hector Hugh 
Munro 

36. Sudden military 
attack 

37. Lounging 
slippers ■ 

38. Tomorrow, in 
Acapulco ' 

41. Rower 
421 Sister of Ares 1 
43. Tuna or marl in 
481 British queen 

49. Cote mom 

50. Charles Lamb 

51. Step or stop 
lead-in 




52. Dad's retreat 

53. Monthly bill 
DOWN 

1. Old crone 

2. "I — Catiicra" 

3. Aries 

4. Musical 
phrases 

5." Kind of code 

6: Legal matter 

7. Location 

8. Became warped 

9. Sandarac tree 

10. Grant's — 

11. Kaffir 



wamor 

16. Land east 

of Eden 

20. Word with down 
or over 

21. Bullet 

22. Pocket bread 

23. Dutch treat? 

24. Word with days 
or dressing 

26. Having leaves 

27. Soviet sea 

28. P.I. Hammer 

29. Shield 

31. Cross over ' 
34. Classroom gadget 



35. H — Girl" 
('63 hit) 

37. West or Murray 

38. Noted anthro- 
pologist 

39. River ili Italy 

40. Spanish child 

41. It might be 
good or bad 

44. Solemn 
wonder 

45. Seine sight 

46. Do wrong 

47. Derby or 
Stetson 




rasa acjisajraa 
SBBtam hubs 

ana gskhbh hou 

ciriioa B^BBa 

DQJGfflDD L3EE 

rataraB hbpi taacEa 



MlJyfSMdiSJVMIialvlHl 



ARIES (March 21 to April 19) 
This week brings exciting business 
developments but you need to guard 
against a quarrel with o friend. The 
coming weeks bring an improve- 
ment in your financial affairs. How- 
ever, it *s not a good idea to lend 
money at present. 

TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) 
Partnership interests and reaching 
agreements with others. are high- 
lighted: in the weeks ahead. Be 
patient about a business matter this 
week. Travel promises to be fun. The 
weekend brings happy social times 
with friends and family. 

GEMINI (May 2 1 to June 20) Im- 
portant decisions about investments 
and financial security will be made 
in the next few weeks. New business 
starts are favored now but a co- 
worker may be touchy. A disagree- 
ment could arise about an 
ideological concern. Incentive is 
high. 

CANCER (June 21 to July 22) 
You will be going out more often for 
fun times in the near future. Exciting 
romantic developments make this 
week speciat. Try not to overspend 
pn pleasure interests. If looking to 
move, you receive valuable leads 
now. 

LEO.(July 23 to August 22) You 
may be purchasing office equipment 
for the home this week. Some will 
receive a freelance opportunity. 
Home life will be a major accent in 
the coming weeks. Try not to make 
a big deal out of a little thing going 
wrong early in the week. Agree- 
ments are reached by the weekend. 

VIRGO (August 23 to September 
22) Impatience could mar your 
progress on a work project this week. 
However, exciting times arc in store 
for you where romance and leisure 
interests arc concerned. Your own 
perfectionism could get in your way 
on a certain project. 




* 




LIBRA (September 23 to October 
22) Financial prospects will be im- 
proving in the next month or so. You 
will be shopping for home and fami- 
ly now but don't overspend on 
pleasure interests. It *s a week of hap- 
piness for you in recreational inter- 
ests and romance. 

SCORPIO (October 23 to 
November 21) A growth in self-con- 
fidence will mark the weeks ahead of 
you. You are coming into your own 
now. Be patient with a family mem- 
ber this week. Avoid an inclination 
to be critical of others early on in the 
" week. 

SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to 
December 21) You will opt for more 
time for yourself in the near future. 
Money developments now are posi- 
tive. Distractions may interfere with 
your concentration early in the week. 
The weekend finds you sharing fun 
times with friends. • 

CAPRICORN (December 22 to 
January 19) This week begins a very 
active period of increasing socializ- 
ing for you. Some of you will soon 
join a club or organization. You will 
receive some happy news that per- 
tains to career interests. 

AQUARIUS (January 20 to 
February 18) It's best not to force 
issues in business this week. Work 
from behind the scenes is profitable. 
The coming weeks, though, bring 
important career progress. Welcome 
news comes from friends at a dis- 
tance. 

PISCES (February 19 to March 
20) You begin a cycle this week that 
favors travel and educational inter- 
ests. You may not make as much 
progress with an unfinished task as 
• you would like but good news comes 
how about a financial matter. 

©1994 by King Features Synd. 



re*SU 1 tS -n. consequence; ' 

conclusion, outcome; effect... iFO?5r5T^ 

■ ■ I placed this ad on a Tuesday In lifcoland $ 2 Bedroom ul , I 



Newspapers bocauso, being a Waucooda 
Loader subscriber, I wanted my home offered 
locally. The Classified Ad- Visor helped wrile Iho 
copy and designed Iho ad In a very appealing 
manner, and It appeared in a!l 14 Lakeland 
Newspapers that Friday. Oy Iho neil day t had 
received over 25 calls on the house. It was 
rented that day, but I still continued to receive 
calls, even two weeks oiler the ad ran. 
Thanks, Lakeland. Great results!" 

J.E.D.,WauconrJa,lL 



2 Bedroom Hbo w i 
ft tarfaMe March V sr * 

i £*%&»&! 

ft "efnoerajorand f 
2 slovefncfudtti tf 



Ifyou'rc looltttiff for . results, "Hike ILu jmjIiiL 
to try your local source UrslI 

Lnkcliuul Newspapers • 708-223-8 KSl 



ST. PATRICKS FLOOR SAMPLE 




Immediate Availability 






\imzm 




it 

Floor Samples & 
Factory Samples 

Store Wide 

Sofas Loveseate 

Chairs Sectionals 

Sleepers Daybede 

End Tables Lamps 

Pictures 

Curio Cabinet! 

Dinettes Bunks 

All Size Mattress 

Sets * More. 

All Famous Names 

you Can Trust! 

. NOT ONE PENNY DOWN 4 NO 
INTEREST OR PAYMENTS TIL JUNE 
FOR ALL IN STOCK ITEMS 



STORE HOURS OPEN 7 DAYS 
10AM4PH 



EVENINGS BY APPT. 



OLD V0LO VILLAGE GIANT 

ANDQUEHAa AUTO MUSEUM I 

RESTAUfUKT 




Where To Eat Out 



3035 Pclvtdcrc Si. Waulttgan 

WAUKEGAN'S 
FINEST 

PARKWAY 
RESTAURANT 

Savings Certificate 

CERTIFICATE GOOD FOR 

$10 OFF THE SECOND DINNER 

WHEN PURCHASING THE FIRST 

DINNER AT FULL PRICE 

Valid Seven Days A Week From 4:00-8:00 p.m. 
Offer expires April 3, 1 994 

Serving tender steaks to Ltkt County's 

toughest customers for fifty years 

3035 BeMdere Rd. • Waukegan • (708) 336-0222 







CELEBRATE 




Awbw 



in OftTVafo V/ffaye 

E»l/lBkiMtftlMlt«K1» 



Steak & Seafood 
Banquets 

Fine Dining, Casual Atmosphere 
We're Here To Serve You, Our 30th Year 
Dinner theatre by Rosebud Productions 

Make your reservations early 

No Sex Please, 
We're British 

Mar. 11, 12/ 13il&;*9, 20, 25 & 26 

1/2 mile north of Rte. 173 on RteTfe^Richmond 
For Reservations, call 815-678-2671 



WITH 

t Corned 
S Beef and 
t Cabbage 

J jEL Garage 



m 




><»j 






* If M 41 I ANT \ M1M\< STATION * 

A (Located on the Upper Level At Hawthorn Mall jl 

J Next to Marshall Fields) " 

* L J * On All W7 jl 

* "Well Drinks" VA y 



■jt 



:« 



JcIinV 



367-4704 






V 



y **,-*. . 



=>-*-«* 



• */-%*+* *-*^— ^.* -i*/ti»-i' *-i' 



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^ 




J LAKE LIFE LaI<eIancI NcwspApERS MaacI* 4, 1 994 



-', 





■*■ I 



/ 7' 

V. ; -r. ' 

by Randcc O'Rian 



Irish Whiskey Punch 

My recipe for a favorite beverage using Erish Whiskey, often 
called "the water of life" in Ireland! 



2 cup,, water 

3/4 to 1 cup sugar 

6 whole cloves 

4 (2x1/4 inch) strips lemon rind 

1 (3-inch) stick cinnamon 

2 cups Irish Whiskey 
1 lemon, sliced 



Combine First 5 ingredients in a saucepan, and bring to a boil. 
Boil until sugar dissolves. Reduce heat; remove cloves, lemon rind, 
and cinnamon stick. 

Add whiskey to sugar mixture, and cook until thoroughly heat- 
ed, hut not boiling. Pour into cups, and float a lemon slice in each. 
Serve immediately. 

Makes four cups. 

Irish Stew 

Delicious and perfect for cold weather dining. 

1 cup Burgundy or other dry red wine 

1 clove garlic, minced 

2 bay leaves 

1 teaspoon salt 

1/2 teaspoon freshly ground pepper 
1 1 A teaspoon dried whole thyme 

3 pounds lean beef for stewing, cut into 1-inch cubes 
1 1 A cup olive oil 

2 (10 1/2-ounce) cans condensed beef broth, undiluted 
6 carrots, scraped and cut into 2-inch slices 

12 small boiling onions 

6 medium potatoes, peeled and halved 

Combined first six ingredients; pour over beef in a shallow dish. 
Cover and refrigerate eight hours. Drain meat, reserving marinade. 
Remove and discard bay leaves. 

Meat oil in a Dutch oven over medium heat; brown beef in oil. 
Add broth and reserved marinade; bring to a boil. Cover, reduce 
heat, and simmer 11/2 hours. Add carrots, onions, and potatoes; 
cover and cook 30 minutes. 

Makes 2 1 12 quarts. 



Happy St. Paddie's Day 

CMalley, O'Rian, 0'Gargan...O, to be Irish 

llio.se whose ancestors began on the Emerald Isle have an unmistakable pride in their heritage 
that, for at least one day a year, can make folks of other backgrounds green with envy. 
]yiy Lcprcchauns-Tracle, Nicole, Heather and Alexis wish the Luck of the Irish to you. 



a j >* * n* t\ § < m?m t% 4 m 





Rose O'Gargan's Duffy Wreath 



You'll need: ■ 

12-14 Inch straw wreath (leave the plastic 
wrap on) 

7 or 8-1/2 yard pieces of assorted Irish 
theme fabric 

Metal U-shaped florist picks 

Cut the fabric pieces into 5"x7" rectan- 
gles. With the metal florist pick, weave it 
through all four sides of a 5"x7" fabric piece. 
This will form a fabric puff. 

Push the florist pin with it's fabric puff 
into the straw wreath. Continue placing the 
fabric puffs around the wreath to All. 

This great idea works for any season or 
holiday. 

Thanks Rose! 




Minted Miniature Eclairs 

Easy, and pretty presentation. 

3/4 cup whipping cream 

2 teaspoons powdered sugar 

1 tablespoon green creme de menthe 

12 ladyfingers, split 

1/2 cup commercial fudge topping 

Mint leaves (optional) 



Beat whipping cream until foamy; gradually add sugar, beating 
until soft peaks form. Add creme de menthe; beat until stiff peaks 
form. 

Spread cream filling over bottom halves of ladyfingers. Cover 
With top halves. Spread 2 teaspoons fudge topping over top of each 
eclair. Garnish with mint leaves, if desired. 

Makes 6 servings. 




t 



*'4*» IS 



AdvertlMmtnt 



Weight loss program 
introduced to area women 



Illinois area residents arc invited 
to try a new program to help Ihcm 
lose weight through a new method 
using videotapes at home. 

InControl — A Home Video 
Weight Loss Program is used by 
the American Heart Association in 
its health promotion program. 
Heart at Work. 



People interested in using the In 
Control program in their own home 
may now call the distributor, Health 
Products Marketing, toll free at 
1-800-288-8446. A Program 
Director will call you bock with 
information and cost. ; 

Call today, between 8 am and 10 
pm, to start the program by March 
14th. 





Q 



g 

s- 

In 
Q 



LUND BOATS & PONTOONS 




with 48 horsepower Johnson • 
Starting 
at 



wrsepower uonnson 

$ 1 0,500 



Doitt Be Fooled By So Called Boat Show Specials 
Buy The Best For Less At C. Haling & Sons 



it HALING 8 SONS 

Full Service Marina • Parts & Accessories 
"Over 70 Years Of Customer Satisfaction n 



2-1/2 Miles W. 

01 Rk. 59 On 
Grm Like Ad East Shorn 
Off Grm Laki In Antioch 
(708) 395-2250 

Hon: Daly 10 to 5; Ootid Mond*yi 



y 

c 



c 

5 



c 

D 

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Uohnman ~Uohnmon *Uahnuan "Uohnman "Uohnman "Uohnman "Uohnman 




Kids Fare 




Joan Kraus© and Jonathan Weir In " little Red and Hei Frtend$. 



■■'.* 



1 



little Red «t Marriott 

Stepping out of an all-time 
favorite, storybook and on to 
Marriott's Lincolnshire Theatre 
for Young Audiences is Little Red 
and Her Friends. The fun -filled 
journey to grandmother's house 
is more enchanting than ever in 
this musical version of Little Red 
Riding Hood. 

Join the Marriott crew as Little 
Red and her pet sheep Fcleecc 
meet Depiddy Bear, Reginald 
Rabbit and of course, the Big Bad 
Wolf, on their fairy tale trek 
through the woods. 

Performances are scheduled 
through May 20 most 
Wednesdays and Fridays at 10 
a.m. and Saturdays at 11 a.m. 
and March 28 and 29 at 10 a.m 

Individual tickets are $6 and 
arc available by calling the box 
office at 634-0200. Groups of 15 
or more are $5 and arc available 
by calling 634-5909. 



Sherlock solves mysteries 

Right on the tails of the criti- 
cally acclaimed "Sherlock 
Holmes and the Curse of the Sign 
of Four," the Northb rook Theatre 
Children's Company follows with 
their own answer to the Victorian 
Master sleuth. "Young Master 
Sherlock Holmes" is a play with 



an imaginative twist on the 
favorite character — he's a teen 
in Victorian England, just ventur- 
ing out on his first mystery. The 
games afoot as Sherlock and his 
sidekick, Watson, try to track 
down a parcel of love letters that 
might have grave international 
consequences .... a young 
Morlarty also wants the letters — 
for blackmail. 

The Northbrook Theater 
Children's Company Is a highly 
acclaimed and unusual program. 
Using young actors ages 10 - 15, 
the program stresses education 
and training in theatre. For this 
purpose the Northbrook Theatre 
presents more than one cast — in 
this case two cast were used "(but 
many productions sport three or 
four) giving as many children as 
possible a chance to experience 
the opportunity to appear in a 
fully mounted theatrical produc- 
tion. 

■V Performances are Saturday, 
March 12 and March 19 at 1 p.m; 
and 4 p.m Tickets are $5 each. 
Call 291-2367. 



Much 11, 1**4 UltdANd Newspapers LAKELIFE 

Into Th e NiqriT— 

aw 




Friday 

Certain Distant Suns, hailing from Northwest Lake County, will play an 
all-ages Q101 show at the Cabaret Metro, 3730 N. Clark, Chicago , , . 
White Brothers will sing the blues at Bcckman's House of Blues, 1340 
Grand Ave., Waukcgan. Club opens at 8 p.m . . . Reggae with Smoke? * 
the Seventh Seal at Slice of Chicago, 36 S. Northwest Hwy., Palatine, 
991-2150 . . . More reggae with Roots Rock Society at Cabana Beach 
Club, 1550 N. Rand Rd., Palatine, 76-9050 , . . U.J. B., rock performs at 
Shades, 21860 N. Milwaukee Ave., Dccrflcld, 634-BLUE . . . Public I, R&B, 
at Durry Nellies, 55 N. Bothwell, Palatine, 358-9150 . . . White Saddle 
Band will ride Into Route 176 and 83, Mundeleln, 949-0858. 
Saturday 

Mike McCoy Is atO'Tralna's, 110 Main St. Wauconda, 526-4499 . . . 
Stndebaker John and the Hawks at Bcckman's House of Blues ... 
Tinsley Ellis plus Greg Pasenko at Shades . . . Defaxury, R&B, at 
Cabana Beach Club . . . Gay Lawrence £ Chldeco Zydeeo at Slice of 
Chicago . . .White Saddle at Sundance Saloon . . . Simple Simon, rock, 
at Durry Nellies . . . Redeye Express will appear at the Village Spirit In 
Round Lake Beach. Call 546-1 100. — by CLAUDIA M. LENART 





PSYCHIC FAIRS 



RAM ADA HOTEL 
HW Hwy. RL 14 at S3, Palatine 

SAT. & SUN. MARCH 12 & 13 

Hours 10-7 

America's Best Starring IRENE HUGHES 

Joseph DeLociise •Martena Rock Lady 
•Melody Joy 'Alexandria East -BUI Monroe 
and Many Others •Lectures 'Private Consultations 
Marlena Psychic Rocks & Crystals 
Also: 
March 19 &20-DAYS INN, 
Hwy. 50 & 194, Kenosha, Wl 



1 Off 1 Consultation With This Ad 70B-805-1 177 



ixy 



~tl 




_jUrieMKocfcu*fr_| 



^s* 



■lorida's Finest."^ 

INDIAN RIVER AREA'S *> 
BEST TRBE'RiPSNSD 

»: ^ F RUIT IS COMING!!! 

Tsifipt* OranftM mt, m, m, «•<*> M0.0O] 

■Sink S««dl#fts Grapefruit w% «. «• *g . . .•t.OO • 
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(MEET OUR TRUCK AT A LOCATION NEAR YOUI •- 
WhM$vtrth» w*/w, wt7! b* th*nl 



J! 1 . Whgtom ifrt— rfTTnw fowling *&*kmf to producing ti» 
IL twMlwt, mo* ftevwful eSrot. Enjoy wtha ctrut agahl Tait* . 
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ST« - ' * . . > 

(TREE-RIPE CITRUS CO. Johnson Cm *> Wl 80Q-747-58sQ 



ONLY 1-1/2 HOURS PER LOCATION! 
WEDNESDAY, March 23 (W 20) 

• KBiOSHA*SHOPKO*5300 52rdSL(H*y.15a)*»4Mpa 

THURSDAY \March 17 (Apn w) 

• GUflNEE • RIVERSIDE PLAZA • Wuhington St 4 

Miwtukee Ava. (Rh>. 21) • itftlOn 
*ROUNDLAKEHEfiHTS*FAMILYVIDEO<724W.Roira*lt.1Mp« 
•McHBfflY* PALACE B0WL« 3400 N. Rdmond (Rte. 31 )*M*)pm 

FRIDAY, March 18 (April is) 

• CRYSTAL LAKE* MENARDS'US 14 & Rtt. 31 * M030 m 

• PALATINE "MENARDS • 1775 N. Rand (Rte. 53/12, 

3 bfks.fi Of Dundee RA)«1M:»pm 

• E, DUNDEE (ELGIHJ «M ILK PAIL VILLAGE* 12 ni N. of 

1-90 on Djidee Ave. (Rte. 25) '3-440 pn 

Schedules available (or our 67 Wl & IL locations! Orange varieties 
change as the season progresses, grape! ruit available each vlsll. 




Lakeland Newspapers/RMC Theatres 

ACADEMY AWARD 

CONTEST 

Entries must be postmarked 

no later than 

Friday, March 25, 1994. 

Winners announced in your April 1 st issue - 
Lakeland Newspapers 

Movie Tickets From 
RMC Theatres 

14 Winners!* 

1st Prize-12 Admissions 3rd Prize-6 Admissions 

2nd Prize-8 Admissions 4th Prize-4 Admissions 
10 Runner Ups-2 Admissions Each 

NO LIMIT! 

Enter as many times as you want 



Antloch Theatre 

Lltaertyvllle Theatre 

McHenry Theatre 

Show Place Theatre. Crystal Lake 

Grayslake Outdoor Theatre 

McHenry Outdoor Theatre 

Dunes Theatre. Zlon 

Lake Zurich Theatre 



St 

The Fugitive 

In The Name Of The Father 

The Piano ~~ 

The Remains of the Day 

Schindler's List 



I 4. Best Supporting Actress 

i Holly" Hunter, The Firm 

fl Anna Paquin, The Piano 

I . Rosie Perez, Fearless 

■ Winona Ryder, The Age ol Innocence 

I Emma Thompson, In the Name of the Father. 



7. Musle Original Score 

Elmer Bernstein, The Age of Innocence 

___ Dave Grusin, The Firm 

James Newton Howard, The Fugitive 
Richard Robbing, The Remains of the Day 
John Williams. Schindler's List 



L Best Actor 

_ Daniel Day-Lewis, In The Name of The Father 
_ Laurence Fishbume, What's Love Got to Do With II 
_Tom Hanks, Philadelphia 
_ Anmony Hopkins, The Remains of the Day 
_ Uam Neeson, Schindler's Ust 



5. Best Supporting Actor 

Leonardo DiCaprio, What's Eating Gilbert Grape 

Ralph Fienries, Schindler's Ust 

Tommy Lee Jones, The Fugitive 

John MaBtovich,' In the Line ol Fire v 

Pele PostJethwaite, In the Name of the Fattier 



3. Best 

Angela Bassett, What's Love Got to Do With It 

Stockard Channing, Six Degrees ol Separation 

Holly Hunter, The Piano 

Emma Thompson, The Remains ot the Day 

Debra Winger, Shadowiands 



6. Best 

Jim Sheridan, In the Name of the Father 

Jane Campion, The Piano 

James Ivory, The Remains of Ihe Day 

Steven Spielberg, Schindler's List 

Robert Altaian, Short Cuts 



Mail your ballot to: 

Name — 

Address 

Phone ■ 



Lakeland Newspapers Academy Awards Contest 

c/o Lakeland Newspapers 

P.O. Box 268, Grayslake, IL 60030 



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■Nou: In ana <X Um, Mriwt portrwti mO Ottmnir* mw, 

■■ CUP OUT-MAIL IN II 



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TFI LAKELIFE UI<eIan<I NEwsjwptRs MarcIi 11„ 1994 




MoviE Pi 




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Christian. Singles 

On Saturday, March 12 at 10 a.m. meet at Calvary Temple to car pool to the 
Domes In Milwaukee. Christian Singles will have lunch at the Old Country 
Buffet In Racine. 



'Rea 




has its moments 



SUNtlAy: ;: : . 






Widowed Outreach 

Widowed Outreach Network of Lake County, a group of men and women of 
all ages, meets the fourth Sunday of each month at the Condel! Day Center in 
Llberlyviltc at 2 p.m. Dinner at a local restaurant is optional fallowing the meet- 
ing. . 



TuEsdAy 



Gem and Mineral Society 

The Lake County Gem and Mineral Society general meeting will be held at 
the Waukegan Public Library on Tuesday, March 15 at 7 p.m. The address Is 129 
County Sl, Waukegan. There will be a slide program at Mineral's. For more 
information call 623-3292. 

Caring Group 

St. Gabriel's Church in Vernon Hills is offering Caring Groups, an opportunity 
for anyone to experience Christ's love. Caring Groups meet every Tuesday at 7 
p.m. For more information contact the Rev. Paul Heal, Jr. at 367-5510 or Janet 
Mai at 590-1458. 




•K'r-xWv-VvKW 



IpidNBdAy 



Solo Singles 

Soto Singles will hold their St Patrick's Day Dance on Wednesday, March 16 
at the Princess Restaurant, 1290 S. Milwaukee in Libcrtyvillc from 8 p.m. to mid- 
night. Special raffle for those dressed in green. For more Information call 816- 
1011. 



Coming, Soon 



Baseball card show 

The Great Lakes Naval Training Center's Baseball Card Show will be March 
26 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Family Activity Center in Forrestal Village at the 
Great Lakes Naval Trainig Center. For more information call 6B8-2239. 



Ethan Hawk 
Winona Ryder 

Romantic comedies have 
always been one of our weak- 
nesses, so Winona Ryder's latest 
flick, "Reality Bites," was tops on 
our "to see" list 

* The beautiful Ryder is riding 
high right now with an Academy 
Award nomination for her role in 
"The Age of Innocence." 

Her switch to the role of 
Lclaina, a '90s young single who 
has a lame job with little future 
and longs to make movies, is a 
360 degree turn and the better of 
the two performances in our 
opinion. 

She hangs around with a 



group of singles that insist on 
behaving like they did in high 
school and college because they 
are not ready for adult roles. . 

Almost sounds like an episode 
from "Melrose Place," or Beverly 
Hills 90210," as Ryder spends 



much of her time trying to decide 
if she loves Ethan Hawk, who 
plays Troy, a jobless rock musi- 
. clan full of artistic temperament, 
or Michael, a music video top 
honcho, played by Ben Stiller. 

Stiller, the character who we 
expected to be the stuffy 
employed one, turns out to have 
a romantic soul, and Hawk turns 
in an enthralling performance 
giving his character a lot of gypsy 
selfishness, even cruclncss, until 
he reveals another personality 
when he tells Ryder of his love for 
her. 

Ryder, who gets better with 
each appearance, is riveting as 
the young lady, who like her pals, 
suffers from the Peter Pan syn- 
drome, as she tries, to dissipate 
her confusion and grow up and 
find true love; 

: For having more than its 
share of tender and moving 
moments, we rate "Realty" four 
out of five stars,— GLORIA DAVIS 



MoNTfilylMeeiNqs 



Mom's Place 

Mom's Place, a drop in center for 
moms and preschoolers with planned 
activities and speakers, meets 
Tuesdays at First Baptist Church in 
North Chicago, Thursdays at 
Inglcsidc United Methodist Church, 
and Fridays at First United Methodist 
Church in Waukegan. Meetings arc 
from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. For more 
information call Carol at S87-6G55. 

Lugar Para Madres 

Lugar Para Madres, a drop- in center 
for moms and preschoolers with 
planned activities and speakers, 
meets Thursdays at Lakes Region 
Bible Church, Hound Lake from 10:30 
a.m. to 12:30 p.m. No fee involved. 
For more information call Joscfina at 
587-R655. 

Alzheimer's Group 

Alzheimer's Support Group meets 
In Lindcnhursl the third Wednesday 
of each month from 7 to 9 p.m. at 
Victory Lakes Continuing Care 
Center, 1055 E. Grand. They also meet 
the first Monday of each month at 
Salem United Methodist Church, 115 
W. Lincoln Ave., Barrington. Call 933- 
1000 Tor further information. 

Parent Group 

The Parent Group sponsors weekly 
Parents Anonymous support groups. 
Fridays from 9 to 1 1 a.m., Thursday in 
Vernon I fills from 7 to 9 p.m. and in 
Zion on Tuesdays from 8 to 9 p.m. 
and Wednesday from 3 to 4:30 p.m. 
For more information call 263-7272. 



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3 



Belvidere Mall 

Theatres 662-741 O 

Belvidere at Lewis in Waukegan 



Ample Parking 
GUNMEN (R) 

Daily 3:20-5:15-0:40 

THE FUGITIVE (R). 



si .50 all aeats all shows 



LIKE WATER FOR CHOCOLATE 

(COMA AGUA PARA 

CHOCOLATE) (R) 

Fri., Mon.-Thurs. 3:10-5:15-7:30-0:45 
Sat. & Sun. 1:00, 3:10-5:15-7:30-9:45 

HOUSE PARTY III (R) 

Fri., Mon.-Thura. 3:15-5:15-7:15-9:40 
Sat. & Sun. 1:15-3:15-5:15-7:15-9:40 



Fri., Mon.-Thurs. 7:15 
Sal. & Sun. 1:00-7:15 

SISTER ACT II (PG) 

Fri., Mon.-Thurs. 4:50-7:05-9:30 
Sat. & Sun. 2:00-4:50-7:05-0:30 



a 
B 

a 

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a 
a 

B 

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a 

a 
a 

a 



Rose>i(idP/'0<i[u.ctm$i 994 

DINNER/THEATRE SEASON: 


111 


March 11, 1Z 13, 18, 19,20,25/26 

M No Sex Hease f We're Brittth" 

A wiid farce about some newlyweds who qg\ Into 
hysterical situations as they try to unload a, ,, 
. shipment of pom sent to them in errprl 

Play by Anthony Marriott 
A Alistir Foot 


Audfi&s* 

Call 815/678-2671" 


STEAK AND SEAFOOD HOUSE 

r( .-,j ,1/2 Mile North of Rt. 1.73 on U.S. 1 2 - t 

Richmond , IL 




r 



■sisaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaBaEiaaaaaBiiHaaaaaaBH 



GURNEE CINEMA 

GURNEE MILLS SHOPPING MALL • 70B-855-9940 



ADULT HAT. $4.00. ADULT EVE S6.7S 
FRIDAY. MAR 



SA. CIT. MAT. $2.00 W • F • CWLO/SR. CIT $3.50 ALL OTHER TIMES 
11 THROUGH THURSDAY, MAR. 17 



GREEDY 



BLANK CHECK 



MY FATHER THE HERO 



LIGHTNING JACK 



SCHINOLER'SUST 



ACE VENTURA: PET DETECTIVE 
IN THE NAME OV THE FATHER 



WHAT'S EATING GILBERT GRAPE 

HO PASSES 



THE CHASE 

NO PASSES OR MOV. FW TICKETS 



ON DEADLY GROUND 



REALITY BITES 



GUARDING TESS 



PG-13 F-SU 1:20-3:456:45-9:20 M-TH 3:45-6:45-9:20 



PG F-SU 2:30-4:35-7:15 M-TH 2:30-4:35-7:15 



PG F-SU 12:25-9:20 M-TH 9:20 



PG-13 F-SU 1 2:55-3:05-5:1 5-7:20-9:30 M-TH 3:05-5:15-7:2D-9:30 



R F-SU 12:30-4:15-8:00 M-TH 4:15-8:00 



PG-13 F-SU 1:10-3:10-5:10-7:10-9:10 M-TH 3:1 0-5:1 0-7:1 0-9: 10 



R F-SU 9:15 M-TH 9:15 



PG-131F-SU 1:30-4:00-6:50-9:25 M-TH 4:00-6:50-925 



•IS 



PG-1SF-SU 1:00-3:00-5:00^7:00-9:00 M-TH 3:00.5:00.7:00-9:00 



R IF-SU 12:40-2:55-5:107:25-9:40 M-TH 2:55.5:10-7:25-9:40 



P6.13f.SU 12:30-2:45-4:55-7:05 M-TH 2:45-4:55-7:05 



PG.13lF.SU 12:20.2:25-4: 30-6:55.9:05 M-TH 2:254:30-6:55-9:05 



= DIGITAL THEATER SOUND 



H 



■., ■ 



OPEN DAILY MATINEE OPEN DAILY MATINEE OPEN DAILY MATINEE 
LAKE ZURICH THEATRES 708-550-0000 < 

ROUTE 12 EAST OF ELA RD.. LAKE ZURICH 

r, OO ADULTS -■:) OIJ CHILOn'FN '<lJn<J<>r I I) 
•3 OO MON FRI UNTIL 5 PM SAT K. SUN. UNTIL 2^30 PM 



MOVIES AND TIMES START 

I GUARDING TESS (PQ13) 
GREEDY (PG1 3) 
GILBERT GRAPE (PQ13) 
BLUE CHIPS (PG13) 
THE PIANO (R) 
ON DEADLY GROUNDS (R) 
THE CHASE (PG13) 
REALITY BITES (PG1 3) 
IN THE NAME OF THE FATHER <R) 
SCHINDLER'S LIST (R) 
ACE VENTURA: PET DETECTIVE (PQ13) 
MY GIRL 2 {PQ 



3-11-04 

1:45-3:45-6:25-8:35 

1:25-3:50-0:1 5-3:45 

1:20-4-6:25-9 

1:40-3:504:20-8:40 

1-*;OS 

1-3:15-5:45-4:35 

3:30-8:50 

1:35-3:40-8-8:55 

3:35-3:25 

12:45-4:30-8:15 

2-3:55-8:15-8:30 

1:15-0:35 



Quit Smoking 
In 60 Minutes 

o n /K $ 89 00 

No Weight Gain! 

ByliHlkktml 
Appointment 

One Year 

Guarantee 



.Call for 
information 

356-2670 or 

^1-800- 

310-2675; 




James R.Baker 

Certifteid 
Hypnotherapist 



CJNEpUx OdEON ThEATRES 



r ■ 




Offnex Oocon 



RIVERTREE COURT 



Schtndler's List w> (Olniiai) 

1:00-4:45-8:30; weekdays 4:45-8:30 

BARGAIN ON PIRST St IOW ONLY 



Angle (R) (Dolby) 
2:15-4:45-7:15-935; weekdoya 4:45-7:15-9:45 



What's Eating Gilbert Grape? <pg-13> (Dolby) 
2.00-4:30-7:00-9:30; weekdays 4-30-7:00-9s30 



Guarding Tess (i'G-13) (Dolby) 
1:00-3.-OS-5:lO-7:lg-9:20; weekdays 5:10-7:15-9:20 



Philadelphia u>g-13) (Dolby) 

7:10-9:40 dally- 



Blank Check (PC) (Dolby) 

1:00-3:00-5:00; weekday* 5:00 



The Chase (PG-13) (Dolby) 
2:00-3:55-5:50-7:50-9:45; weekday 5:50-7:50-9:45 



On Deadly Ground (ft) 

1:15-3:20-5:30-7:403:50; weekday* j 



Reality Bites (FC-13) (Dolby) 

1:10-3:15-5^20-7725-930; weekday* 5:20-7:25-9:30 



:*:•:•"•:•:*: 






1:00-3:05-5 



The Ref m) (Dolby) 
:10-7:20-9-30; weekday 



weekdays 7:20-9-30 



Greedy (pg-13) (Dolby) 

2:15-4:45-7:10-9:40; weekdays 7:10-9:40 



Mrs. Doubtfire (PG-m) 

2:00-7:00; weekdays 7:00 



. Sugar Hill (It) (Dolby) 
4-30-9:45; weekday* 9:45 ' 



•No PftUCS ' 



Ace Ventura (PG-13) (Dolby) 

2;00~3:50-5;40-7:3S-9:25; weekday* 7^5-9^25 



SHOWPLACE 1-7 815-455-1005 
ROUTE 14 & ROUTE 31, CRYSTAL LAKE 

5 OO AtlULTS • 3 UO CHILDREN (Unrtor I 1) 
3 00 MON FRI UNTIL 5 PM SAT A SUN UNTIL 2 30 PM 



MOVIES AND TIMES START 3-11-94 



GILBERT GRAPE <PQ13) 
THE CHASE (PG1 3) 
SCHINDLER'S LIST <R) 
ACE VENTURA: PET DETECTIVE (PG13) 
ON DEADLY GROUND (R) 
REALITY BITES (PG1 3) 
j GREEDY (PG1 3) 



1:25-4-6:25-8:50 

• 2:30-4:30-6:45-8:55 

12:45-4:30-8:15 

2:15-4:15-6:20-8:20 

1:45-4:15-6:30-8:45 

2-4:05-7-0:05 

1:30-3:50-6:35-0 



OPEN DAILY MATINEE OPEN DAILY MATINEE OPEN DAILY MATINEE 



II ITT I XIII 



SHOWPLACE 8 WILLIAMS STREET. CRYSTAL . 
615-455-1005 v 5.00 ADULTS '3.00 CHILD ( 1 1 & UncNjr) 



GUARDING TESS (PG13) 



FRI., MON.-THURS. 7-9 
SAT. 8 SOW. 3:30-4:30-7-9 



ANTIOCH THEATRE 

37H LAKE SI ANTIOCH 

30 5 O^IG 



•4" ADULTS »2- CHILD (11 & UNDER) 

y UNTIL SPM 



MRS. DOUBTFIRE (PG13) 



FRI., MON.-THURS. 6:30-0 
SAT. 8 SUN. 1:3Q-4-a:3Q-B 



LII3LHTYVILLE 1 ft 'i 

70R N MILWAUKEE 

LIBCnTYVlLLE 



» 4 » i2oo chilq 

ADULTS (11 & UNDER) 
1*2°° FIRST AFTERNOON SHOW 



THE PIANO (R) 



GRUMPY OLD MEN <PQ13) 



FRI., MON.-THURS. •:18-«:4S 

SAT. 8 SUN. 1-3 :45-S:1S-«:4S 

PM)., UON.-TUURl. 1:414 

SAT. 8 SUN. 2:1S-4:3Q-«:4*-» 



McHt NHY 1 K ■? 

?tM CRFl-N SI., 

IVlcHl Nl { Y 

(M i r.) :ins o i .\a 



•4 00 ADULTS 

•2« CHILD (1T& UNDER) 

.W UNTIL 5 P.M. 



MRS. DOUBTFIRE (PQ13) 



FRI., MON-THURS. «;1S-ft 
SAT. 8 SUN. 1:1M4;1M 



BLUE CHIPS (PQ 1 3) 



FflL. MON.-THUHS; «:3&-«:4S 
SAT. A SUN. a-4:1B-*3»«:4S 



m 




K M*«ch 11, 1994 UkElANd NcwspflpURS HEALTH WATCH 




■-■ '. ; :. 



I HS ( «>()<l Sin \)\\u\ 



:'."• 



national Recovery; 

This alcohol/chemical ;. 
dependency recovery pro - 
gram Is ■ an alternative to 
Alcoholics Anonymous. 
Meets at 6:30 p.m. 
Thursdays in the ACCESS 
Group Room at EHS Good 
Shepherd Hospi^Fbr.o:v 
more information icall 381 - 
0123, cxt 5400. 

Stroke caregivers 

This free support group 
helps spouses and family 
members cope with the 
challenges of caring for 
someone who has had a 
stroked Meets from l^tq'2 
I p.m^eyery Monday at EHS i 
Good Shepherd's Mind- 1 
Body Medical Center; For *■ 
more information call 842 - 
4493.= :[; i'M'»M?$l 



', Sports in Jury clinic 

For injured competitive 
and recreational athletes, 
this clinic is staffed by an 
orthopedic surgeon and an 
athletic trainer. A physi- 
cian's referral ;is not re- 
quircd;but appointrneiits 

U-; are necessaiy. Meets;- at 4i30|§ 
p.m every Tuesday and 7:30 
a. m. ; every Thursday in Suite 
33 of Doctors Office Building 
Northon EHS Good 

^Shepherd Hospital's cam- 
pus. Call 381-0123,cxt 5254 -■>* 

Birth center tours 

Tours of EHS Good 
Shepherd's Birth Center are 
; 1 offered at 7:30 plnC 
|.*^esdays aiiid\ 10:30 a.m.' 
Saturdays for parents-to-be 
who have a physician on*- 
If EHS Good Shepherd's hied- ^ 
ical staff. Call 381-0123, ext 
5300 for further infbrmatioit *j 







■ ?:\. 



Sibling class 

. A free Sibling Class for&l 
^children ages 2 172 to 9 
|>years of age will be held at 
1 1:15 p.m. on Sunday, Marclv : 
&13'in trie Allen Conference •, 
f Center at Condell Medical;' 
'teriter;700$arfield Ave., 
: Urjertyyille. Each child must 
be accompanied by a par- 
ent Class prepares young 
•people for the arrival of a 
§new baby in the family. 

Registration required . Call 
1362-2905, ext 5275; 



Arthritis support 

group .; 

Ttie Arthritis Action 
^Council of Lake County will 
meet at 2 p.m. on Sunday, 
March;13 at the Allen 'x 
Conference Center at 
Condell Medical Center 
^Meetings, which are open to 
the public, provide educa- 
tion, information and sup- 
port for those persons with: 
arthritis and members of 
their families. 

Diabetic support ; 

: group -^;v ;• 

^Condell's Diabetic 
Su pport and Education 

.Group will meet at 7 p.m. on" 
Wednesday, March 16 at 
Condell Medical Center^ 900;; 

iGarfleld Ave., Libertyville. 
Group meetings proyideah 
Jopportunity.to share con- 
cerns and questions wltlv 
ether persons with diabetes 

?and health professionals. 

• ^information caU 362- 

^2905rext 5437^ 



American Diabetes Association sounds alert about diabetes 



Approximately seven 1 million . 
Americans in the United States 
arc missing viral medical treat- 
ment and may be at high risk for 
heart and kidney disease, stroke, 
blindness and amputation. 
According to the- American 
Diabetes Association, 13 million 
people in the United States have 
diabetes, but more than one half 
of these individuals arc undiag- 
nosed and arc not* receiving the 
proper treatment. 

The American Diabetes 
Association wants to locate these 
seven million Americans, includ- 
ing an estimated 330,000 Illinois 
residents, during the nationwide 
American Diabetes Alert on 
Tuesday, March 22. The 



American Diabetes Alert pro- 
motes the often . ignored symp- 
toms of diabetes to help identify 
people at risk for the disease. 

Finding out if you arc at risk 
for diabetes is as easy as answer- 
ing eight simple questions on the 
American Diabetes Association's 
written Diabetes Risk Factor Test. 
Individuals are asked if they have 
a family history of the disease, If 
they arc a member of a high risk 
group (African American, Native 
-American or Hispanic), and if 
they have experienced diabetes 
symptoms, including excessive 
thirst, extreme fatigue, blurry 
vision, unexplained weight loss 
and frequent urination. 

Diabetes, the fourth leading 



cause of death by disease, Is a 
silent killer. "Our goal is to save 
lives," said Thomas L Pitts, M.D., 
president of the Northern Illinois 
Affiliate of the American Diabetes 
Association. "Because diabetes 
symptoms can develop so gradu- 
ally, they arc often Ignored. Most 
people only discover they have 
diabetes after they are treated for 
one of the major complications 
such as heart disease, kidney dis- 
ease, blindness or nerve damage. 
Early detection of diabetes is crit- 
ical for preventing or limiting 
these serious health problems. 
The Diabetes Risk Factor Test 
enables people to find out if they 
arc at risk and become aware of 
the often difficult-to-dctect 



symptoms, before they suffer 
from its complications. " 

Diabetes, is a serious disease 
that affects the body's ability to 
produce or process Insulin, a hor- 
mone that Is needed to convert 
food into energy for daily life. 
Currently, there is not a cure for 
diabetes, but proper treatment 
can control blood sugar levels 
and help prevent or delay dia- 
betes-related complications. 

The American Diabetes 
Association is the nation's lead- 
ing non-profit health organiza- 
tion supporting diabetes research 
and education. For more infor- 
mation about diabetes or the 
American Diabetes Alert, call 
312-346-1805 or 1-800-433-4966. 




Lakeland 

Newspapers 



Laser brings relief to chronic snorers 



RHONDA VINZANT 

Editor In Chief 

For one out of. four 
Americans, getting shoved in the 
middle of the night to quiet their 
snoring is a common occurrence. 
Despite the way those who snore 
have been portrayed in cartoons 
over the years, the sleeping dis- 
turbing sound can be an indica- 
tor of much more than lack of 
sleep for a spouse. Snoring can be 
an indication that the offender is 
suffering from obstructive sleep 
apnea. 

Modern medical science, has 
'discovered that snoring is often.' 
related to physical obstructive 
breathing during sleep. This 
physical obstruction occurs when 
the muscles of the palate, the 
uvula, and sometimes the tonsils 
relax during sleep and act as 
vibrating noise-makers when the 
air of breathing moves across 
them. Excessive bulkiness of tis- 
sue in the back of the throat as it 
narrows into the airway can also 
contribute to snoring, as can a 
long palate and/or uvula 

Modern medical science has 
also found that snoring can npw 
be treated with the laser surgery 
which trims and reshapes the 
uvula, .which has no real function. 

"Snoring is not a fiinny prob- 
lem, " said Dr. Neil D. Pollock, an 
ear, nose and throat specialist 
practicing at Condell Medical 
Center professional building. "It 
is a significant problem. It leads 
to marital discord, memory loss, 
depression, day-time tiredness 
and poor job performance 
because the individual is not get- 
ting a good night's sleep." 

Pollock is one of only three 
Lake County doctors to perform 
the laser surgery that reshapes 
the uvula, and boasts an 85 per- 
cent cure for snoring. An addi- 
tional 12 percent of patients find 
that snoring is reduced. 

, "There are several advantages 
that laser surgery offers over the 
previous option to treat snoring, 
which was surgery to cut the 
uvula," said Pollock. 

Among the advantages arc: 
the old operation required hospi- 
talization up to one week and 
then three to four weeks down 
time and could cost between 
$5,500 and $10,000 on an average 
basis. Laser surgery is performed 
in the office with no loss of work; 
The procedure takes approxi- 
mately 10 minutes and is usually 



repeated three times, with each 
procedure being accomplished 
one month apart. Each session 
runs $350 to $550, making the 
total cost of the procedure about 
20 percent of the cost of surgery. 

"The complication rate with 
lasers is near zero percent," said 
Pollock. "In the old operation 
there were complications with 
bleeding and scarring in the 
throat. With lasers, patients will 
have a sore throat following the 
procedure that may last for a cou- 
ple of days." 

In the United States, 50 per- 
cent of the male' population 
snores," said Pollock. "These 
men often become unwelcome 
roommates on vacations and 
business trips as well as at home. 
"Many of my patients tell me that 
their company asks whether or 
not they snore when they make 
assignments for accommoda- 
tions at a convention or during a 
business trip." 

Pollock recalled the story of 
one couple he met while treating 
their daughter. "This couple was 
laughing and telling me that they 
had gotten a divorce over the fact 
that he snored," said Pollock. 
"For many people snoring has an 
extreme impact on their lives." 

"The laser surgery is a simple 
procedure to help a significant 
problem," said Pollock. "When 
performing the procedure, one of 
my goals Is to get the spouse back 
into the bedroom." 

The impact is likely to 
increase as an individual ages. 




Dr. Noll Pollock talks with patient Stove Popovfch about 
progress following laser surgery.— Photo by Rhonda vlnzant 



his 



Statistics show that 85 percent of 
Americans over the age of 50 
snore, 60 percent arc males and 
40 percent arc females. 

"Muscle tone decreases as 
people age," said Pollock. "Being 
overweight seems to have an 
effect on the snoring as does 
menopause." 

Perhaps the most serious rea- 
son for a patient to consider hav- 
ing surgery to eliminate snoring 
is the fact that snoring can be an 
indicator of sleep apnea. 

Obstructive sleep apnea is 
diagnosed when loud snoring is 
interrupted by episodes of com- 
pletely obstructed breathing. 
This condition can be serious and 
sometimes fatal if these, episodes 
last over ten seconds and occur 
more than seven times an hour. 
The cumulative effect of these 



obstructed breathing episodes is 
reduced blood oxygen levels to 
the brain, forcing the snorer to 
stay in a lighter sleep stage so that 
the breathing passage muscles 
arc kept tighter. This prevents 
the snorer from obtaining the rest 
benefit achieved only during 
deep sleep and can lead to a ten- 
dency to fall asleep during day- 
time hours— on the job, or 
worse, at the wheel of a car. 

"People with sleep apnea arc 
twice as likely to have hyperten- 
sion and have two to three times 
the number of automobile acci- 
dents as those not suffering from 
the disorder," said Pollock. 
"Additionally, 20 percent of them 
are obese and 80 percent of obese 
people snore." Sleep apnea is 
diagnosed by a sleep lab follow- 
ing extensive testing. 



Laser relief quiets man's nights, improves health 



RHONDA VINZANT 

Editor In Chief 

For Steve Popovich, 56, snor- 
ing is a condition that impacted 
his life for as long as he could 
remember. 

"I think the first time I was 
told I snored was in boot camp 
when I was 17," said Popovich, a 
former Marine. "Sleeping in an 
open bay barracks the other guys 
definitely let me know that I was 
disturbing their sleep." 

Popovich sluffed off his snor- 
ing and other health problems to 
the fact that he is diabetic, figur- 
ing it some how impacted the sit- 
uation. 

"I was constantly tired u ujid 
had memory loss," said: 
Popovich. "I was constantly 
experiencing deep depression 



and had trouble sleeping." 

As Popovich aged his health 
problems increased. "I was the 
ideal model for the coach pota- 
to," said Popovich. "I had no 
physical energy, I was overweight 
and couldn't lose any and I was 
very depressed." 

And, as he aged, Popovich's 
problems become greater. "My 
family life was always strained, it 
was not good. I was not fun to be 
around. My performance on the 
job suffered greatly because I had 
a lot of trouble remembering 
things." 

The answer to his medical 
problems came when Popovich 
was hospitalized for complica- 
tions related to his diabetes. 
m "£Puring my stay in the hospi- 
tal 1 feePaslcep in the bed and.l 



woke up and couldn't move my 
body. I couldn't move anything 
but my mouth and my eyes. They 
treated mc for diabetic shock but 
then my doctor suggested that I 
undergo .a sleep study which 
determined I was suffering from 
severe obstructive sleep apnea," 
said Popovich. "After three stud- 
ies they determined that I did 
have apnea and I began using a 
machine while sleeping that 
forces air into the lungs to pre- 
vent a loss of breathing." 

Studies showed that 
Popovich had only a 65 percent 
oxygen saturation rate which was 
causing an irregular heartbeat 
and a heart rate that would swing 
between very low and very' rapid. 

"When I went to the sleep 
Sec LASER page B29 V ' 1? ' 1„ 



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HEALTHWATCH UktlANtl Newspapers MarcI* 11, 1994 



Victory's Pulmonary 
Rehabilitation Program: 
Exercise plus education 



"Victory's Pulmonary Rehab 
Program is a quality program 
which provides the exercise I 
need," says Miriam Mcintosh, 67, 
Grayslakc. "I feel better about 
myself and my lifestyle." 

According to the American 
Lung Association, over 25,000 
Lake County residents arc affect- 
ed by chronic bronchitis, 13,000 
by adult asthma and 3,000 by 
emphysema. 

"Many people who have respi- 
ratory problems fail to join the 
program because they feel they 
can't do the exercises," says 
Trudy Adams, respiratory thera- 
pist at Victory's Pulmonary 
Rehabilitation Services. "Mow- 
ever, we often sec a 50 percent 
improvement in tolerance as a 
result of our program." 

The Pulmonary Rehabilitation 
Program at Victory Memorial 
Hospital, Waukcgan, is a three- 
phase program designed for indi- 
viduals with chronic obstructive 
pulmonary disease (COPD). 
COPD includes emphysema, 
chronic as th ma, chronic bronchi- 
tis and brochtcctasis. 



The program is a combination 
of education and exercise which 
enables individuals to cope more 
effectively with their respiratory 
impairment. Participation in the 
program results in improved 
activity tolerance, reduced anxi- 
ety, reduced depression, fewer 
hospitalizations, the ability to 
return to work and a better quali- 
ty of life. 

Miriam and her husband, 
George, 66, have been using the 
facilities at Victory's Pulmonary 
Rehab Program for over four 
years. "The Pulmonary Rehab 
Program has helped my wife as 
well as myself," says George, a 
Phase III Cardiac Rehab patient. 
"I feci stronger and healthier. If I 
miss a week, I can tell that I 
haven't exercised." 

To join Victory's Pulmonary 
Rehabilitation Program, consult 
your physician. If. you arc new to 
the area or do not yet have a 
physician, call Victory's Physician 
Referral Service at 360-4101. 

For more information about 
Victory's Pulmonary Rehabilita- 
tion Program and Services, call 
300-4131. 



i H *■ 




Three's company 

Three's company,.just ask proud mother, Dawn Shauer, Beach Park (sitting) as she holds two of 
the 1hree recent additions to her family, Samantha.(4 pounds, 17 Inches) and Katharine (3 
pounds, 15 Inches). Behind her stands Stephen I. Stpos," M.D., who holds triplet number two, 
David (4 pounds- 5 ounces, 1 8 Inches), On Feb. 1 5, Slpos delivered the triplets via cesarean sec- 
tion at Victory Memorial Hospital. The delivery marked his third set of triplets. His second triplet 
delivery was also performed at Victory Memorial 1 5 years ago. Dr. Frank Sun (Waukegan) assist- 
ed with the delivery. Also pictured Is Eileen Bames, Clinical Nurse IV (right), Victory's New Family 
Center.— Photo courtesy of Victory Memorial 



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d>ute)e 



Great camp meals can be easy to fix 



When It's mealtime at the campsite, 
quick and easy doesn't have to mean 
hamburgers and hot dogs for every 
meal. Camp cooking needn't rpe a 
time-consuming drudge, either. 

The key to fast, no-fuss camp meals 
with gourmet appeal Is planning. Start 
by creating your camp menu. Then do 
as much food preparation as practical 
before you leave home. 

The following suggestions will get you 
started. 

• At home, prepare foods such as 
bean or rice casseroles, cookies and 
sweet breads, roast beef or baked 
ham, and then freeze them. 

These foods provide the basic In- 
gredients for several camp meats. 
Sliced roast beef rolled around a fla- 
vorful stuffing and served with gravy, for 
example. Or try French dips or beef 
slices topped with pizza sauce and 
cheese. Use similar Ideas for ham. The 
last of the beef or ham can be used to 
make hash, or Chinese rice, or can be 
added to a salad. 

Storage hint: Use two large coolers, 
one for fresh foods and one for frozen. 
Use fresh and frozen foods before 
canned food and non-perishables. 

• At the supermarket make selec- 
tions, according to personal tastes, 
from the wide variety of packaged 
one-dish meals, soup mixes, sauce and 
beverage mixes, puddings and other 
dry-packaged foods that add zest to 
meals with a minimum of effort. 



• Don't overlook herbs, spices and 
flavor-enhancing wines. These Ingredi- 
ents take up little space and will lift *or- 
dinary" dishes to gourmet status, 

Good equipment Is vital to a camp 
kitchen. The bare essentials .Include 
coolers, campstoves, jugs, pots and 
pans, eating utensils, folding tables and 
lanterns. Adding some extras from the 
equipment list below will make camp 
cooking more efficient and enhance 
creative cooking capabilities: 

■ A folding stove stand to put your 
campstove at a comfortable cooking 
level. 

• A griddle and camp oven, both fit 
over the burner of the stove. The griddle 
puts breakfast on the table, even for 
larger groups, in short order. And the 
Irresistible fragrance of fresh-baked bis- 
cuits, muffins or cakes hot from the 
camp oven speaks for itself. 

• For extended trips or larger groups, 
consider a bulk propane system which 
will handle multiple stoves and lanterns 
using the same fuel source. 

• A hinged, wire mesh basket Is great 
for grilling over charcoal. 

• Just for fun, take along a popcorn 
popper or a pie Iron. 

• Put beverages In Insulated Jugs 
and always take one or more water 
Jugs, depending on the water supply In 
camp. 

• Fit together two small dlshpans, a 
sponge, a scraper pad, small bottle of 
detergent and towels, and you have 
the necessities for quick clean up. 



Be creative — add a gourmet touch to camp meals 



To lift camp meals Into the gourmet 
status; add a little homemade 
gariic/herb butter to meats, yegeta : 
bles, baked .potatoes and French 
Bread. Other spices' that add zest to 
ordinary meals are thyme, marjoram, 
basllroregano; chives, nutmet, cloves, 
ginger, cinnamon and seasoned salt. 



Beef and chicken bouillon graunlev 
drlec minced onion, Italian salad dress- 
ing to marinate and season meats or to. 
add to a pasta salad also add fiavoffto 
your meals. Top a favoriterKcasseroie 
with a packaged chpese sauce and 
croutons for a different twist on ah old 
family favorite. 



HASTINGS LAKE YMCA 
DAY CAMP 

Ages 6-12 Years Old 




Activities 

- Boating/Canoeing 

- Horseback Riding 

- Swimming 

- Sports/Athletics 



-Archery 

- Sailing 

- Waterskiing 
-Overnights 



•Extended care hours 
at no additional 
cost 7 a.m. -6 p.m. 

*Free T-Shirt 
and Photo 



♦Transportation from 




Call 356-4000 for brochure 



NEW FOR 1994 

• Horsemanship Camp 




21155 W. Golden Rd. 

Lake Villa, IL 60046 

(705) 356-4000 




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MARch 11, 1994 UIceIancI Newspapers HEALTHWATCH 




Health Department 



The Lake County ■. Health 
Department announced that 
results of the Northern Illinois 
Health Survey arc now available. 
The survey is a behavioral risk 
factor survey of the residents of 
what arc commonly known as the 
"Collar Counties" (Lake, Du Page, 
Grundy, ' Kane, Kankakee, 
Kendall, McHcnry and Will 
Counties). It was the result. of a 
collaborative effort between a 
consortium of local health 
department officials and the 



University of Illinois College of 
Medicine at Rockford, The pur- 
pose Is to learn more about the 
health habits of residents of the 
Collar Counties and to assist pub- 
lic health officials in meeting 
community wide needs. 

"I feci that the results of this 
survey offer concrete needs that 
can now be targeted through 
public health prevention pro- 
grams," stated Dale Galassic, 
executive director of the Lake 
County Health Department The 



results of Northern Illinois Health Survey 



.survey examined nine different 
areas of health: safety, weight and 
exercise, blood pressure and cho- 
lesterol, cancer prevention, dia- 
betes, mental health, alcohol and 
tobacco use, and health insur- 
ance. Approximately 500 Lake 
County residents were ques- 
tioned for the survey, and nearly 
4,500 total in the Collar Counties. 
"As with most any survey of 
this magnitude, we found results 
that were both encouraging and 
worrisome," said Dr. James Jupa, 



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Patient education 

Margery Woll. director of Surgical Services (left, front),. Jackie Wenrich,. director 'of Post 
Anesthesia Care and Pain Management 0eft, back), Cheryl Lemke, director of Same Day 
Surgery (right, front) and Marlon Van Bergen, assistant director of Surgical Services (right, back) 
are part of the driving force behind the development of Victory Memorial Hospital's preopera- 
tive patient education video which helps patients prepare for surgery.— Photo courtesy of 
Victory Memorial Hospital. 



Dr. Siddique to head Lake County Medical Society 



Mohammed' Siddique, M.D., 
an Internist who has practiced, 
medicine in take County since 
1975, was elected president of the 
Lake County Medkal Society in 
December and began his term in 
January. The first Medical Society 
meeting of the year was a gala- 
event held at St Therese Medical 
Center in Waikegan which fea- 
tured Pakistani food and enter- 
tainment. Over 100 physicians 
from all parts of the county 



attended the dinner and heard an 
enlightening talk by guest speak- 
er Arther Traugott, M.D., current 
President of the Illinois State 
Medical' Society. Dr. -Traugott 
spoke on "The Changing Face of 
Healthcare." 

Dr. Siddique faces a challeng- 
ing year of leadership in this tur- 
bulent time of pending health- 
care reform. He is a qualified 
leader who has spent many years 
as an elected delegate to the 



{Illinois State Medical Society 
representing Lake County. Dr. 
Siddiquc's office is in Gurnce. 

The Lake County Medical 
Society, headquartered in Vernon 
Hills, serves as the professional 
association for over 650 physi- 
cians who live or pratice in Lake 
County. The Society has a referral 
service for community members 
who are seeking physicians in 
nearly all specialties. For more 
information, call 81 6-8900. 



Forest Hospital's 'Stressed Out?' to air on TV 



A half-hour television pro- 
gram produced by Forest 
Hospital to help individuals cope 
with stress in everyday life will be 
shown on CNBC, a national cable 
station. Called "Stressed Out?" 
the segment will air at noon, 
Saturday, March 12 as part of 
American Medical Television's 
HcalthStyles programming. 

"Stressed Out?" offers advice 



, from health care professionals, a 
recreational therapist and a 
dietitian on emotional, mental 

- and physical techniques to con- 
trol stress. • 

Home video copies of 
"Stressed Out?" also arc available- 
the cost is $21.95, including ship- 
ping and handling. To order, call 
the Forest Hospital Video 
Department at 635-4100, cxt. 365. 



Serving the northwest suburbs 
for more than. 35 years, Forest 
Hospital is a private psychiatric 
facility offering treatment pro- 
grams for children, adolescents 
and adults suffering from mental 
or emotional disorders. The hos- 
pital also offers comprehensive 
programs for eating disorders, 
dual diagnosis, substance abuse 
and partial hospitalization. 



Laser 



From page B27 . 
study I prayed they would find 
something wrong with me," said 
Popovich. "1 was so depressed. I 
really thought I was losing my 
mind because I couldn't remem- 
ber conversations that I just had." 
Popovich 's condition caused him 
to retire with disability from his 
job at the Great Lakes Naval 
Training Center. "I had so many 
medical problems that I felt that I 
was a walking autopsy." 

Popovich considered the pre- 
vious treatment for sleep apnea 
but after hearing Dr. Neil Pollock 
speak on the laser treatment at a 
monthly support group meeting 
for snorers decided to make an 
appointment. 

"He had a real blockage,** said 
Pollock. - "You could not see his 
airway when examining his 
mouth." 

Popovich began laser treat- 



ments with Pollack Nov. 13, 1993. 
After three treatments he is no 
longer snoring and is finding a 
dramatic improvement in his 
health. 

"I had everything to gain and 
nothing to lose," said Popovich. 

Today, Popovich is losing 
weight, taking step aerobics and 
is now considered component 



enough to watch his two grand- 
children- during the day. 

"I have a much better family 
relationship," said Popovich, who 
continues to use the Bi-Pap 
pump when sleeping but has 
seen a great deal of improve- 
ment. 

"This has literally been a life- 
saver for me," he said.' 



General childbirth class announced 

The New Family Center at Victory Memorial Hospital is now 
taking registration for its five-session "Prepared 
Childbirth/Ccsarcan Section" class. The class will meet at 7 p.m. 
on five consecutive Tuesday nights beginning March 15 at the 
hospital, 1324 N. Sheridan Rd., Waukegan. The cost of the class is 
$30. 

A "Prepared Childbirth/Ccsarean Section", is taught by a 
Registered Nurse certified childbirth educator. Class size is limit- 
ed so it is important to register early. Call the New Family Center 
at 360-4121 to register for this and other childbirth preparation, 
classes. 



medical advisor for the Lake 
County Health Department. "For 
instance, Lake County ranked 
high on issues of vehicle safety 
and home safety." The survey 
found that 67 percent of respon- 
dents always use their seat belts, 
and 83 percent always use car 
scats when driving children. This 
compared with 63 percent of total 
Collar County respondents for 
scat belts and 82 percent for car 
scats. In addition, 91 percent of 
Lake County respondents cur- 
rently have a working smoke 
detector In their home, compared 
with 90 percent of the Collar 
Counties. 

Somewhat less encouraging, 
according to D. Jupa, were the 
statistics on weight and exercise. 
The survey found that 61 percent 
of Lake County respondents con- 
sider themselves overweight, 
only 47 percent complied when 
told to lose weight by their doc- 
tor, and only 45 percent complied 
when told to exercise more. 

Overall, however, compliance 
to physician recommendations 
were high among -the Lake 
County group. With prescribed 
blood pressure medicine, 92 per- 
cent complied with physician 
recommendations, and 89 per- 
cent when prescribed cholesterol 



medicine. Also, 72 percent com- 
piled when instructed to cut 
down on salt In their, diet, and 61 
percent compiled when recom- 
mended to cut back on their alco- 
hol intake. 

Another area that had both 
positive and negative results for 
Lake Countians was cancer pre- 
vention. On the plus side, only 14 
percent of Lake County respon- 
dents smoke, compared to 17 
percent among the Collar 
Counties and 25 percent nation- 
ally. Of those who smoke, 69 per- 
cent have made at least one seri- 
ous attempt to stop. Also encour- 
aging was the fact that 98 percent 
of women surveyed have had a 
pap smear during their life. 
However, on the other hand, 34 
percent of women have never 
had a mammogram, 28 percent 
have never examined their 
breasts for lumps, and 63 percent 
of men have never examined 
their testicles for lumps. 

"While there are both positives 
and negatives to the results, we 
arc excited at the local informa- 
tion now available to us through 
this study," said Dr. Jupa. "This 
will clearly enhance planning 
future health programs and ser- 
vices for our residents of Lake 
County." 



LCSHD recognizes community, 
staff and volunteers 

Lake County Society for Human Development (LCSHD} held their 
annual Appreciation Dinner on Feb. 9, at the Ramada Inn in 
Waukegan. Many volunteers, customers, community, employers, staff, 
clients and other supporters were appreciated for their tireless dedica- 
tion to the mission of the agency. 

LCSHD assists Lake County men and women with disabilities to be 
more independent in work and living. The "Worker of the Year" was 
presented to Donald McClosky for outstanding effort and improve- 
ment in his duties. Leigh Jackson was awarded the "Five Year Service 
Award," and Lisa Cummings accepted the "Executive Director's 
Award." Abbott Laboratories was presented with the "Customer of the 
Year" award for outstanding support with sub-contract work, Dick 
Attanasio attended to accept. 

LCSHD, located at 3441 Sheridan Rd., Zion, is also very thankful for 
the community supports and volunteers who contribute time and 
effort at the "Our Society" Resale Shop at 3273 Sheridan Rd. If interest- 
ed in donating or volunteering, call 872-1700. 



^t 




The problem of Chemical 

Dependency doesn't go away . 

When you pretend your alcohol or drug problem doesn't exist, 

you're only fooling yourself. At Victory Memorial Hospital's 

Chemical Dependency Programs, we know that even though 

alcohol and drug addiction are destructive diseases, there is a high 

potential for recovery with treatment. 

Just hoping the problem will go away isn't enough. 

Take the first step towards recovery, call us today for a 

confidential assessment at 

(708) 688-HELP, 24 hours a day. 



W? 



VICTORY MEMORIAL HOSPITAL 

• 1324 N. Sheridan Road . Waukegan, IL 

Victory's Outpatient Chemical Dependency Programs are also ' 
available at 203 1 E. Grand Ave., Suite 200, Lindenhurst, Illinois 
Call (708)356-9685. 

A Tola} Qualify Stiaiuxtmtnt Orxaniiutim 



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JJ UPSERVICE UkclANtl Newspapers M*nch 11, 1994 




It's tIhe taII< of tUe town 

Get jt oFf youR cIhest (708) 22 5 '807 5 




Lakeland 

Newspapers 



Upservlce Is a phone-In column presented as a feature of Sham© thfGG tilTIGS 

Lakeland Newspapers. Lakeland Newspapers makes no claim to 
the authenticity of the statements. Lakeland Newspapers does not 
claim the content or the subject matter as.fact but as the person- 
al opinion of the caller. Lakeland Newspapers reserves the right to 
edit copy or to refrain from printing a message. Call In at 223-8073 
and leave your message 24-hours a day. Although the call Is 
anonymous, please leave your village name. 



For shame. Mayor Davis. The con- 
dition of our roads are just awful. 
For shame, for shame. 



r WhAT you TkiNk n 

A COMpilATtON of youR 

ThouqhTS Abom iUe 

IocaI school 

reFerencIa. 

Only three days 

Hey fool/the superintendent 
of Gavin was only gone for 
three days, not seven. And, 
as a taxpayer, I would gladly 
pay for this trip because this 
trip makes him a better 
administrator for our children. 
Thank you Mr. Superintendent. 
Keep up the good work; 
Vote for the referendum. I 
hope It will pass. 

Boy for man's work 

I live tn Antloch Township and 
I am calling about the 
Antloch school referendum. 
The schools have had a blank 
check far too long. Perhaps * 
we have failed to see the 
whole picture. I am not 
against education, but I am 
against poor management. I 
especially did not appreciate 
getting a phone call from a 
high school student trying to 
persuade a "yes" vote. Don't 
send a boy out to do a man's 
work. But, for Antloch admin- 
istrators, this Is typical, 

Voting against it 

I hope that the p'eople of 
Grant Township vote against 
the Gavin School referendum. 
We don't need a new school. 
They are also going to add six ? 
new classrooms but they also 
will be adding a 5,200 square 
foot gymnasium and 2,400 
square foot teachers confer- 
ence room. Is that for educa- 
tion? There is no overcrowd- 
ing at Gavin School. Please, 
please, vote against the refer- 
endum. I'm going to. 

Name dropper 

1 have noticed a direct corre- 
lation between the BEST 
group- and the liberal media 
of the '90s. Lakeland papers 
and Dan Rather, included. 
They tell us what they want, 
not the way it Is. Only the 
likes of Rush Umbaugh and G. 
Gordon Uddy. to name a 
few, keep them in check and 
tell It like It is. That is what 
ACHS needs. Their own Rush 
Umbaugh to counter the 
inaccurate Information BEST 
hands out and that Is printed 
many times In 1hls paper. 
Unfortunately, many of us 
believe whatever they read. 
This Is John from Antloch. 

Get the facts 

Vote no on ACHS, Before you 
vote yes, get the facts. The 
price quoted on the fact 
sheet sent by the school Is an 
approximate, not an actual 
figure. The first question a 
home buyer asks Is whether ! 
• can afford to pay the taxes 
on this home? Teachers stop 
hiding behind students. The 
real question Is money 



Don't call him 

I have something to complain 
about. I agree with the person 
who called In about Jury duty. He 
said, *l hope I'm never called 
again." I have that same attitude. 
I spent two weeks on Jury duty for 
an automobile accident case. The 
Ihlng that I found was that there 
were no college students, business 
people, professional people on the 
Jury panel. The point I am trying to 
make Is, if Jury duty Is an honorable 
and respectable duty, why don't 
more business and professional 
people embrace the experience. 
Also, why can't the dally stipend 
be Increased to $20. i invite read- 
ers to challenge my position on this 
Issue. 

Wake up 

Attention Mundeleln High School 
parents, board members, union 
officials, and other concerned citi- 
zens, wake up. While your school 
administration Is wrlllng themselves 
up for blue ribbons and accepting 
awards, what is happening to the 
education of our young people? 
The teachers have been stripped 
of the commitment, desire, and 
prestige that has served our district 
so well for years. Does Ihe board 
really know what Is going on? 
Wake up people, don't let a little 
blue ribbon cover your eyes. 

Stopped for nothing 

l would like to congratulate the 
bimbo, no matter what highway 
department, for putting a no left 
turn at Gilmer and Route 83. Sitting 
there at 5:30 in the morning, wait- 
ing for no traffic to go by, still 
unable to make a left turn because 
of the sign. It is the most ridiculous 
Ihlng I have even seen. 

Not fair 

This is to the animal owner who felt 
It was fine to tie out your animal out 
In the freezing temperatures with- 
out food or shelter. Some person 
was good enough to care for that 
animal, and now the good 
Samaritan Is being prosecuted. 

Gets what he deserves 

Why don't you sit down and shut 
up, Mayor Davis only gets the criti- 
cism he deserves. He hasn't done 
anything for our community since 
he has been here. They wait until 
the ice and snow melt before tak- 
ing care of them. Why don't you 
get off our backs, 

We didn't 

Vote or shut up. Consider the 
property tax extension for the Juve- 
nile detention center, which would 
spill over Into the following years 
taxes. And, ask anyone who lives 
on the Chain how they feel about 
the Waterway Management 
Agency. Not some little organiza- 
tions. They want the water high in 
the fall so that the hunters can get 
to their blinds. So, now Upservlce, 
you can cut this up like you have to 
the past five I have called in. And 
sound like on idiot, from Antloch. 

Thank you 

I want to thank the person who 
plowed our streets in Ingleslde. For 
two days the post office could not 
deliver because of the streets. 
Someone came and plowed It out. 
Thank you. 



Its in the mail 

I would like to make a comment 
on the mail service in this area. 
Frankly, It slinks, My mall does not 
arrive sometimes until 6 p.m. t get 
mall for other people, and recently 
did not receive two pieces of vital 
mall. It also takes up to five days to 
get mall from this area to another 
part of this state, How can the 
postal service justify a rate increase 
with this kind of service? I wish 1hey 
would get on thebdl. , 

Watching the watchers 

After attending the referendum 
meeting with the BEST people and 
ACHS people, it became clear to 
me that another watch-dog group 
should be watching BEST. , Their fly- 
ers are full of false statements and 
numbers, such as class sizes and 



teachers raises. Plus Ihey did not 
have a response when alerted to 
these Inconsistencies. I say BEST 
stands for Butchering Education to 
Save Taxes. 

Ice for iceless 

I can't believe that boy's first- 
grade Iceless hockey was not can- 
celed Friday night during our last 
major snowstorm. The coordinator 
showed great Irresponsibility "by 
putting both the children and par- 
ents at risk. All the news stations 
recommend that cars should stay 
off the road. It was a huge mistake 
for the coordinator not to cancel 
the games that night. 

The vote is what matters 

More taxpaylng citizens that are 
not feeding off the trough, should 
have shown more support for the 
two good men that represented 
BEST at the . Alliance for Better 
Government's meeting held on 
March 1. Mr. Knutsen and Mr. 



Warrander had odds of approxi- 
mately 10 to 1 and were laughed 
at frequently when they expressed 
their views. I felt sure that the 
majority of the audience was 
already benefiting from some way 
from out tax money. We must start 
getting more Involved In our gov- 
ernment, or, as I see It, our children 
will be paying the entire price to 
educate their children! 

Misunderstanding 

All right, just wait a minute. "A Pox 
on You* responded to my com- 
ment In last week's Upservlce. I 
love Upservlce and Lakeland 
Newspapers, but they must share 
the blame since that was not my 
whole comment. My remarks were 
cut In two/ Part of my remarks 
appeared the week before. I was 
commenting on the shoddy work- 
manship of the cable company. I 
was trying to say that "anyone who 
signed up for cable would be 
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From page B30 . 

endorsing this shoddy workmanship. Unless. people take a 

stand, we are going to continue to get' this type of service. 

Everyone should sacrifice 

I am a senior clttzenon'a fixed Income In Antloch. fhey want 
me to .vote for the school to raise taxes, so I would have to 
pay more money out. If the teachers don't take a* raise In 
pay for two years, I. will be glad to pay for the tax Increase. 

So, where were you? 

I was Wondering where all the so-called members of BEST 
were during the debate last week. If BEST Is such. a large 
group; where were dl the people to support them? 

No clue 

If there Is one thing .that I have learned after attending the 
referendum debate. It was that BEST does not have a clue 
and their leader Is a pompous % A &. . 

Handwriting on the wall 

I am calling form Buffalo Grove on my mobile telephone. In 
regards to Grlnnell's most recent press release, notice how it 
starts out *1 owe Willie Smith." Mr. Gary Del Re, you should 
read the handwriting on. the wall. Get back to Buffalo Grove 
soon. 

Out in the cold 

Are the residents of Round Lake aware of where their tax dol- 
lars are going? Village officials are prosecuting the good 
Samaritan who rescued a dog left out In the bitter cold by Its . 
owners. 



In a school zone. And, don't go 45 miles an hour when there 
are kids on the playground. Look - around and drive right. 



Signs up 



Well,. Mr. Fields and Mr. Domanchuk, I see It was no-deal 
about putting up signs. . You both had your signs up last 
week. 

He's hoping 

Lets hope that the people of, Antloch are not naive enough 
to believe the garbage BEST Is telling them In their hand-outs, 



Okay 



Likes Ralph 



I would like to express my appreciation to Mayor Ralph Davis 
for his, excellent leadership qualities. He Is a man of great 
Integrity. Righteous exalts a nation, but sin Is a disgrace to 
any people. 

An honest man 

J I think candidate Ed Slndles Is a young Tom. Brown. We all 
remember what happened to Tom Brown. 1 support Clint 
■ Grlnnell for Sheriff?* An honest man. : > 

\ Vote no 

'•: Vote no to the Antloch educational fund. Do not be fooled. 
If. passed.. It will bring more overpriced teachers to the sys- 
tem. .Remember. 75 percent of property taxes go to the 
administration and teacher's salaries. Not to the students. 

Drive right! 

This Is to the gentlemen driving the white Sundance on 
March 4, near Oakland Grade School at 2 p.m. Don't pass 



A soft answer turns away wrath, but a hash word stirs up 
anger. The tongue of the wise uses knowledge rightly. But. 
the mouth of foojs pours forth foolishness. 

Another brilliant remark 

hNUM 

. I would like to say that marijuana Is one of natures wonder 
drugs. It should be legalized or you are all &*$#$%. 

Here you go 

I have a complaint about your newspaper. I sent a letter to 
you on Feb. 24 regarding Mr. Sndles mailing unsolicited cam- 
paign literature to the homes of police officers by using con T 
fidenttal official police rosters. You have yet to print that let- 
ter, but, you have seen fit to print different negative com- 
ments about Sheriff Grlnnell in Upservfce. You might aswell 
-come out and endorse Slndles. 

Poor response 

I live In Lake Zurlcn. They sent out a survey asking residents 
. whether they wanted to build a $2-$3 million pool. Out of the 
.15,000 residents, 1.300 responded. That Is pathetic. Guess 

who will be the first to complain when taxes go up $50 a 

year. Everyone, please vote on March 15. . 

Likes Round Lake 

I am calling about the person who said that Round Lake has 
deteriorated since Davis has become mayor. I live In 
Antloch and I. come down to Round Lake three times a 
week. I have been doing. ItJoLvears. JUs.so.muctxbetter,. 
Tne roads arid stores are great, and everything else has 
been upgraded. 



Road work 

I would like to praise Mark Ring and all his troops. They did a 
terrific Job. It Is tlme'that someone told them so. This Is Bill. 

Fire them all 

lam an.ex-employee of the Sheriffs Department. Like > many 
people, I was hired by'another Sheriff. I have always voted' 
for the Incumbent. What people need to know Is that half 
the people supporting Slndles are Sheriff's deputies. They 
aren!t worth keeping. If Clint had any guts at all he would 
fire them. They are' all old-timers, and should be S%'^; 
canned. 

Blame the board 

I live In unincorporated Lake County and after reading 
Llpservlce last week, something needs to be corrected. 
People are complaining about the Sheriff's race. I under- 
stand that. . However, the people who complained from 
Antloch about an hour wait for a deputy shouU contact 
your county board member. It Is not the Sheriff that comes 
up with the budget, It Is the county board. If the county 
board does not give him any money, how can he do any- 
thing? This county has run with two officers In a district for the 
last 15-20 years. It has not changed. The population has 
Increased but has the county board noticed? They are too 
busy giving themselves raises. Wake up and deal with your 
county board members Instead of complaining about the 
Sheriff. Get off his back. .' 



Jailing juniors 



The Idea of spending money for another Juvenile detention 
facility In Lake County Is way off base. We have a nice new 
Babcox Center Jail In Lake County. Let's use that. 

Where's the chief 

This Is rather embarrassing, but who Is the chief of police of 
Round Lake Beach? Who's the chief? Where Is the chief? 
Can anyone tell us? 



Clean up your acts 



Nepotism charges 



1 am a Viet Nam veteran and I have been on a list to get a 
Job with IDOT for four years now. Every winter. I see all of 
these Republican relatives working for IDOT. Why can't they 
give these jobs to people like us who fought for our country 
and cannot find decent Jobs? I would like Jim Edgar to get 
a hold of Kurt Brown for a shake up. That Is what he needs to 
do. 



<r 



Now that the snow Is melting. It has become painfully obvl- 
j3us that. there, are a riumber of Irresponsible dog owners. For 
heaven sake, do you people llke.stepping In that stuff? I sure 
don't. Come on now. clean up your'dog's act. And, If I find 
any more dogs roaming the streets without a leash. I will call 
1he dog warden. Consider yourself warned. 

■ 

Do it at night 

Why can't Lake County be considerate and confine their 
road construction work to the evening hours? It Is becoming 
Impossible to get anywhere to and from here. With the pro- 
posed new road work, we will be stuck forever. Get with the 
program. 



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Match 11, 1994 UI<eIan(I Newspapers BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE 



-BusiiNEss BmEfs 

Home sales off to hot start 

LAKE COUNTY— Despite frigid weather, Baird and 
Warner reports that home sales company jumped 33.5 
percent in January to $112.5 million. Unit sales rose 
34.1 percent, from 473 to G34. In 1993, real estate sales 
in the market got off to a relatively slow start. However, 
when interest rates bottomed out and began inching 
higher early this year, this was all the encouragement 
some buyers needed, said Stephen W. Baird, president. 

Bank receives five-star rating 

ROUND LAKE HEIGHTS— Bauer Financial Reports 
Inc., Coral Gables, Fla., the nation's leading bank 
research and rating firm, has awarded, Lakeland 
Community Bank of Round Lake Heights, its highest 
five-star rating for the third consecutive quarter. This 
prestigious award places Lakeland Community Bank in 
the top classification for safety, strength and perfor- 



mance. The rating is based on the analysis of Sept. 30, 
1003 financial data as filed with federal regulators. A 
five-star rating, the highest on a scale from 0-stars to 5- 
stars, indicates that Lakeland Community Bank's tan- 
gible capital and/or risk based capital exceed twice the 
federal regulatory requirements. In addition, delin- 
quencies and repossessed assets arc manageable, the 
Institution Is soundly invested and it earned a profit for 
'the period ended Sept. 30, 1993. 

Upbeat employment outlook 

\ERNON HILLS—A bullish job market is on tap for 
the Lake County area this spring, according to the 
newest Employment Outlook Survey results from 
Manpower Inc., released for April, May and June. "The 
report here in Lake County shows 33 percent of com- 
panies responding will initiate hiring activity this 
spring while 10 percent indicate employment reduc- 
tions arc intended," said Manpower spokesperson 
Chuck Bartels. "The other 57 percent said they will take 



no action." Bartels said that, overall, hiring tends to 
rebound in the second quarter after winter staffing 
reservations have cased. Locally the outlook was more 
modest three months ago, when 21 percent projected 
adding workers and 14 percent expected staff cuts. A 
year ago, 33 percent foresaw workforce Increases while 
3 percent predicted lower employment rolls. 

Gander Mountain earnings 

WILMOT— Citing strong holiday season sales for its 
catalog and retail businesses, Gander Mountain, Inc. 
(NASDAQ:GNDR) reported record sales and earnings 
for its second quarter ended Jan. 1, 1994. Sales for the 
quarter increased ,41. 3 percent) operating income rose 
27.0 percent and net income increased 15.5 percent 
"Our excellent second quarter performance demon- 
strates the success of our 'value pricing' strategy, . 
expanded product offerings and commitment to ser- . 
vice," said Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Ralph 
L Frcitag, 







Newspapers 



IHiSWEEK 




Park Place Business 
JCeriter in Lake Villa is 
underway PACE C2 

Tax cut 

CPA Greg Seidler 
explains ways to cut 
your 1193 tax bill. 
R*Gr?C5 



Facelift 

Interior. decorator gives 
tips to help homes sell. 
PAGEC5 



Gnmemoye 

The Mustangs head to 
sectional finals. PAGE 
G52 





Company Price Change Di v. 
Abboll 275/8; -1/4 $0.76 

^Allstate;; ; 24 1/2 -3/4 v: $0.72i 

; Amerilcch40 3/4 +1/2: ; $1.92; 

■ AT&T 50 7/B ; -1 3/B $1.32 - 
Baxter V 22 1/8 -1/4 $1;00 
Brunswick 22 5/8 +13/4'; $0.44 

1 Com. Ed. 27;i/8 +1/4 $1.60 
D. Witter 34 -15/8 $0.50 ; 

Kemper 41 +3/4 $0.92 

McDonalds6i 1/4 +1/4 . $0,43; 
Motorola 106 3/8 +3 . $0.56 
Peoples En. 29 7/8 -3/8 $1.80 
QkrOaks 631/8 -5/8" : $2J2 
Sara Lee 223/8 +3/8 $0.64 
Sears 49 1/8. +23/8 $1.60 
.UAL > 128 • -4 1/2 $0.00 
Walgrccns40 7/8 +5/8 $0.68 
WMXTecli.25 +3/8 -$0.60; 
Cherry Ulec; 26 +1 $0.00 



Bay Oaks — an open space option 



ALECJUNGE 

Staff Reporter 

For those who want a quality 
home complete with a country 
atmosphere with proximity to 
Chicago, they may need to look 
no further than Bay Oaks 
Development. 

The unique landscape of the 
parcel provides a breath-taking 
view of Lac (lake) Louette. The 
360-acrc development has 160 of 
acres in the middle of the proper- 
ty designed as a wetland. preser- 
vation and natural resource area. 

Each home must retain its 
own character and not be the 
same as any other home on the 
development. The site features 
the majestic beauty of an old- 
style barn and stone clubhouse 
built in 1925. 

The clubhouse will offer such 
amenities as saunas, a game 
room, an indoor pool, and 
kitchen. The barn is being 
restored with a new roof and win- 
dows. 

" If we get people to see it they 
fall in love with it," said develop- 
er Joseph Buralli. "If they are will- 
ing to drive an extra 15 minutes 
they can get a lot more bang for 
their buck." 

Buralli said lots which sell for 
$90,000 on this property would 
normally be priced at $150,000 in 



Lake Zurich or Hawthorn Woods. 

"We arc located in one of the . 
biggest recreational areas in 
Northern Illinois next to the 
Chain O Lakes Area, right next to 
.Moraine Mills State Park and Volo 
Bog State Park," Buralli said. 

The amenities include the lot 
themselves which range from 1 
1/2 to 3 1/2 acres. The lot sizes 
start at $47,000 and go as high as 
$160,000. Many of them have 
mature trees. 

The site is called the Sayer- 
Skidmore property. Saycr was a 
Chicago businessman who built 
the stone mansion in the front of 
the estate. When he died in 1926 
it was taken over by Billy 
Skidmorc who allegedly had con- 
nections to the Chicago under- 
world and possibly to Al Caponc. 

In the 1930's depression years 
Skidmorc provided employment 
for local' residents. The Internal 
Revenue Service (IRS) caught up 
with Skidmore and he was forced 
to give up his holdings. 

Buralli has taken over the 
property and made steps to 
insure the area is left in as natur- 
al state as possible. Only 108 lots 
will be built on the site. Any 
curves in the road arc made to 
help preserve wetland and natur- 
al resource areas. 

The homes are constructed of 




the highest quality materials. All 
of them have standard features 
such as. cedar siding, intercom 
systems, driveways, nine foot 
basements, hardwood floors and 
marble foyers, All home plans 
must be approved by an architec- 
tural review board. Minimum lot 
sizes for ranch homes arc 2,500 
square feet and 2,600 square feet 






Pictured Is a homo on the Bay Oaks development In Lakemoor. 
The property Is surrounded by trees. The house Is a 4,000 sqaure 
toot structure on a 2.5 acre lot. Lots In the development range from 
1 to a 1/2 acres. 



for two-story houses. 

The price range for home and 
lot packages start at $285,000 
with the higher end being over 
$500,000. 

The development is located 
of Route 134, three miles west of 
Route 12. To find out more about 
the parcel, call Buralli at (815) 
385-4040. 



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Personnel 




Julie Underwood 

Century 21 Tri-Town announces the 
addition of their newest sales associ- 
ate, Julie ftybarczyk-Underwood. 
Rybarczyk-Undcrwood is a graduate 
of Suburban Real Estate Academy and 
the Century 21 Real Estate Academy 
In Dcs Plaincs. She and her husband, 
Dave and son, Jimmy live In Vernon 
Hills. 




John DeRosler 

John De-Hosier, real estate profes- 
sional for Century21 Market Place 
; Ltd., has tapped into the marketing 
information In the real estate industry 
by attending "MegaMa^kcting,' , a 
day-long seminar on marketing and 
advertising. The seminar was pre- 
sented by the Orange County, Calif, 
based advertising agency 

Hobbs/Hcrdcr Advertising. DeRosler, 
along with a select group of 100 top 
local real estate agents discussed the 
emerging trend of personal market- 
ing, high -impact advertising, public 
relations and self-promotion. 
DcRosicrhas been in real estate since 
1908. 




Bob Kelly 

The State Bank of Woodstock, a 
member of Suburban Bancorp, Inc., 
has named Bob Kelly residential lend- 
ing specialist responsible for the pro- 
duction of one-to-four family resi- 
dential loans In the Lake County mar- 
ket. Kelly will operate out of the 
Suburban Bank of Lake County office 
In Vernon Hills. His target area of 
responsibility will be the Mundelcin- 
Libertyvillc area and he will work with 
all customers Including builders and 
Realtors. Kelly joins Leonard Smith, 
who was hired at the Vernon Hills 
office as an assistant vice president 
responsible for loan origination of 
onc-lo-four-family residences. Both 
Kelly and Smith have expert product 
knowledge of mortgage loans as well 
as the Lake County market area and 
they help position the State Bank of 
Woodstock. Most recently, Kelly 
served as mortgage originator for 
First of America Bank in Libcrtyvilie. 



Michael Elsen 

Michael Elsen has been appoint- 
ed to the staff of Realty World-Tiffany 
Real Estate In Antioch. Elsen, a gradu- 
ate of the Univ. of Wisconsin, had 
served many years with major manu- 
facturing firms in management 
capacities. He resides with his wife 
Nancy on Cross Lake In Antioch. 

Ken Krostal 

Ken Krostal, Realtor associate 
with Century 21 Leech and 
Associates, Lindcnhurst was given an 
award for Professionalism in Real 
Estate by that office for the month of 
January. Krostal has been in real 
estate for 15 years. He is a consistent 
multi-million dollar producer, spe- 
cializing in residential real estate. 



Park Place business center underway 



A new 75-acrc business park is 
underway in Lake Villa. The 
announcement was made by 
Kane Kelrnan, Vice President of 
Owen Wagcncr & Co., exclusive 
marketing agents for Park Place. 

Infrastructure is now under- 
way and fully improved lots in 
varied sizes are expected to be 
available in May. 

The property is located on Rtc. 
83 and Grand Avenue (Rtc. 132). 

"We are already experiencing 
a good deal of interest in the busi- 
ness park," said Keirnan. He 
attributes this partially to the 
rebounding market, , pent-up 
demands and the parks accessi- 
bility as well as low Lake County 



taxes and the areas excellent high tion, manufacturing and retail 

quality work force. uses. The one-half acre to four 

"Wc arc offering a quality acre sites may be combined in a 

business park environment at variety of configurations, and are 

reasonable prices," said Kelrnan, available for free -standing single 

"and wc will provide users with or multi-tenant buildings, 

financing and build-to-suit The property has retained 25 

options on their chosen site." acres of environmentally protcct- 



Park Place enjoys flexible zon- 
ing, permitting office', distribu- 



cd land, including mature woods 
and open waters which naturally 
enhance the park-like setting. 



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4641 Grand Ave. 
Gurnee, IL 60031 jgfl_ 
(708) 336-2600 PiMll 



\m ' 



Debbie ChrU tertsen 

CRS/GRI • Broker/Owner 




ERA»-Results Real Estate, Inc. 

641 Barron Blvd., (Rt. 83) ■ f£w i ra i.^_, 
Grayslake, Illinois 60030 fes! &**}. 

Bus: (708) 223-7777 

"If Wc Don't Sell Your House, ERA Will Buy IT!" 

Certain conditions apply. For details, ask to sec » copy of 
the Seller's Security 9 Plan, contract from your local ERA broker. 




- TURN OFTI1E CENTURY CHARMER 
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OUR BEST VALUES 
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MATTRESSES SOLD SEPARATELY SUGHTLY HIGHER 
> . ML YOUR IMTIJUOH NK. 

^^ ^* 800 E. Rout* 45 

Mundilaln, IL 80000 
5S6-2524 

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WILLOWS OF WAD3WORTH! 4400 sq. ft. of unsurpassed quality 
is found in this brand new 4 bedroom, 2 1/2 bath custom residence 
located on a 1+ acre cul-de-sac site. *489,900. 

Call Debbie Chrlstensen at 336-2600 



Refinance or Purchase 

1 Point Closing Costs 

Always the lowest rates 

7.5% 30 yr. Fixed 1 Point 

7.35% 20 yr. Fixed 1 Point 

7.0% 15 yr. Fixed 1 Point 

6.875% 10 yr. Fixed 1 Point 

Special Rates for Loans $100,000 and above 1 ' 
Call now rates are subject to change 

f meri can Fron tiers 







MORTGAGE CORPORATION^.. 

C708) 808-04GG 

An Illinois Residential Mortgage Licensee 
For Wisconsin Properties Call. (1) 414-742-3535 



ft&ST 



Do you have a new car 

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The mortgage you are now holding 
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money in cash today. 




Please call for 
more information 



SECURE FUNDING 
708-548-1390 



"Dreams can come tru 




Manutactured housing is more home than you can 
imagine. 

Today's manufactured home is well constructed, safe, beautifully 
designed and most importantly, affordable. 

With the price of site-built housing today, you canl afford not to 
consider a manufactured home. 



For more Information about manufactured 
housing, contact the Illinois Manufactured 
Housing Association at 1-800-252-9495 













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M*«cb 4, 1994 UkclANd Newspapers BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE: 




Busjness ANd PersonaI Finance 

Greg Seldler, CPA 

Registered Representative of H. D. Vest Investment Securities/ Inc. 



Moves you can make to cut 1993 tax bill 



If you arc like most 
Americans, this is the time of year 
when tax papers fill. your desk 
and worries fill your mind. With 
1993 over there's nothing you can 
do. Or is there? Once the year 
has ended, the tax accounts arc 
mostly closed, allowing little 
room to maneuver. Yet there are 
still ways to cut your 1993 tax bill. 
Consider these possibilities: 

•Look for statutory exceptions. 
The law permits some adjust- 
ments after a year ends, such as 
for an IRA contribution. Eligible 
taxpayers can invest until. April 
15th. The deduction for IRA con- 
tributions is phased out as your 
income increases, but for many it 
can still provide a tax benefit 
Contributions to an IRA arc still a 
good Idea even if your income is 
too high, for you to deduct your 
contribution on your tax return. 
The reason? Earnings on your 
IRA investments will not; be 
taxed. If you do make "non- 
deductible contributions though, 
be sure to file form 8606 so that 
when you do withdraw your IRA 
funds, you will not pay tax again 
on the same money. 

Self employed taxpayers may 
benefit by contributing to a 
Keogh plan, if the plan existed at 
the end of the prior year. No 
plan? Some may still benefit by 
establishing a SEP (Simplified 
Employee Pension), permitted 
even after the year ends. A SEP 
can be set up for a self employed 
individual as .well as a corpora- 



tlon, partnership, S -corporation 
and limited liability corporations 
who have less than 25 employees. 
There arc several options with 
these plans but the benefit is that 
up to 15% of self employment 
incomc(after reduction for self 
employment tax) can be con- 
tributed to the plan and deducted 
on the self employed persons 
form 1040. 

Companies can also make 
deductible contributions to their 
employees SEP/IRA accounts as 
well as allow for contributions to 
be made by the employee 
through payroll deductions. SEP 
plans are simple to establish and 
usually have fewer administrative 
costs and filing requirements 
than Keogh and 401 K plans. They 
are also flexible enough to allow 
the small business owner to 
decide from year to year whether 
or not to make a contribution. 

. 'Don't overlook deductions. 
Many taxpayers miss deductions 
because of the law's complexity., 
One common oversight involves 
the home office, still a lawful 
deduction for many. Points paid 
for mortgage refinancing often 
get mishandled , too. Some tax- 
payers miss the tax-exempt sta- 
tus of savings bonds used to pay 
for education. Others overlook 
tax credits that they arc entitled 
to take such as child care credit 
which also allows for a portion of 
the amounts paid for a maid, 
housekeeper, babysitter, or cook 
if they are at least partly for the 




Vit, •*£• w tar. 



■* 



Soldier 



well being 
and ■' pro tec-' 
tlon of a 
qualifying 
individual. 

•Check dif- 
ferent filing 
options and 
elections. If 
you're single, 
with dependents, check your eli- 
gibility for filing as head of house- 
hold. If you're married and both 
of you work, compare the tax 
consequences of filing jointly or 
separately. Under certain cir- 
cumstances, filing separately will 
save you money. Review with 
your accountant any elections 
that might cut your tax bill or 
defer payment of taxes. One elec- 
tion available this year applies to 
taxpayers hit by the new, retroac- 
tive 36% and 39.6% tax rates. The 
extra tax resulting from the high- 
er tax rates can be paid in three 
installments, free of penalty and 
interest charges. It's an election 
every qualifying taxpayer should 
consider. 

Don't be one of the many tax- 
payers who needlessly overpay 
their taxes. Call if you'd like our 
assistance in keeping your tax lia- 
bility as low as the law allows. 

All material presented is general 
in nature and should not be acted 
upon without professional assistance. 
If you would like our help in applying 
the general information to your specif- 
ic situation, You may call Greg Seldler 
at (708) 680-0095. 



fi% .vi* . 



The Choice of Professional 
Police Officers 



THE PROBLEM: 

The current administration has lost 
the trust of its own officers through 
lack of leadership and failed 
management techniques. 




ELECT MARCH 15 



THE SOLUTION: 

Elect Ed Sindles 

•unanimously endorsed by the Lake County Sheriffs 

Fraternal Order of Police 
•unanimously endorsed by the Waukegan Fraternal 

Order of Police 
•unanimously endorsed by the Libertyville Fraternal 

Order of Police 
•Bachelor's and Master's degrees in Administration 

of Criminal Justice from University of Illinois 
•28 years of professional law enforcement experience 
•18 years as an instructor of law enforcement at College of 

Lake County, three years at the Police Training Institute 



Q 

LLI 



SI N DLES 



FULL-TIME -FULL TERM 




Investment 





. Noah A..Seidenberg, • 
Investment Representative of Edward D. Jones & Co. 

Income depends on 
credit risk, maturity 

Low interest rates typically spur economic 
growth, because the low cost of borrowing 
money encourages companies to expand. In 
recent years, however, declining interest 
rates have devastated individuals who 
depend on regular income from their invest- 
ments. 

For example, 10 years ago, short-term U.S. 
Treasury bills yielded about 9 percent, but in- -• Ww »«9 
flation was less than 4 percent— offering a healthy, 5 percent 
"real" return for investors. Today, U.S. Treasury bills offer little or 
no real income after inflation. 

Declining interest rates have forced many investors to look for 
alternatives. There arc generally two ways to earn higher interest: 
Invest in securities with longer maturities, and invest in securities 
that offer sonic risk. • 

The typical short-term certificate of deposit has a maturity of 
about 90 days and pays the lowest interest. To increase Income; 
you must invest for longer periods. For example, when six-month 
Treasury bills yielded 3 percent, five-year Treasury notes paid 
more than 5 percent, and 10-year Treasury bonds paid nearly 6 
percent. 

However, as interest rates change through the years, the value 
of Treasury securities fluctuates. U.S. Treasury securities always 
return the full face value at maturity, but if you have to liquidate 
before then, you could suffer a loss of principal, depending on 
interest rates at the time. 

For example, a 20-year bond with a face value of $1,000 and a 7 
percent interest rate would fall in value by $99 if interest rates rise 
by one percentage point If rates instead fall by one point, the 
value of the bond increases by $1 1 6. 

The reason for this is that investors arc willing to pay a pre- 
mium for a bond that offers higher interest than the prevailing 
rates. On the other hand, investors can demand a discount on 
bonds that pay interest below prevailing rates. 

Shorter term bonds tend to be loss volatile than long-term 
bonds. A bond similar to the/one in our previous example, but 
with a maturity of only five years instead of 20, would gam or lose 
only about $40 in value for every one-point fluctuation in interest 
rates. - ■ 



If you want to give the competition the advantage, 




ADVERTISE. 



On the other hand, go ahead and adver- 
tise to attract all the customers you want. A 
good ad will create interest for your product - 
and people will have a desire to try it. And a 
good ad campaign will use your dollars to the 
best advantage by making all of your media 
selections work together as a team. 

At Logo-agogo, we know how to put 
together effective, cost efficient advertising 
and promotions. We handle all your creative 
and printing needs. Call us today for a free, 
one hour consultation. 



Lo go-a gogo 



Advertising/Graphic Services 

(708)223-8167 

Ad Campaigns • Logos • Identity Pieces 
Designed & Produced 






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p 




BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE LaIceIancI Newspapers Mutch 11, 1994 



New Piggly Wiggly partners look forward to challenge 



STEVE PETERSON 

Staff Reporter 

Welton Management Services 
has sold its Interest in the Piggly 
Wiggly, located in Gurncc. 

Dick Welton, head of WMS, 
confirmed Schultz Savc-O- 
Storcs, Inc. has taken over the 
store. 

"Ninety-percent of the em- 
ployees have taken positions with 
our other three stores at Round 
Lake, Mundclcin and Gurncc/' 



Welton said. 

WMS employs some 400 peo- 
ple. . 

Me said those stores will be 
served by the supplier Roundy's. 

Meanwhile, a two-week grand 
opening is underway at the newly 
named Gurncc Piggly Wiggly. The 
store is now under the direction 
of Don Tingwald and Jim 
Locwcn, 

The two have worked at the 
Zion Piggly Wiggly. 



"We're combining our efforts., 
and forces. It was something we 
wanted to do, and when this op- 
portunity arose, we jumped at it," 
Tingwald said. 

' Locwcn has been in the gro- 
cery business for 22 years. "He 
started as a stock boy and worked 
his way up through the ranks," 
Tingwald said of his partner. ■ 

Tingwald received his start in 
the grocery business working at 
Buchlcr Brothers, "That was a 




Hoelz Professional opens shop 



Century 21 Hoelz Professionals cut the ribbon on their new office building In Grayslake this week. 
Doing the honors were In the center of the photo: Co-owner Kim Hoelz, Mayor Pat Carey, 
Tiffany Chudy, Little Miss Grayslake and Chris Hoelz along with a host of agents,— Photo by 
Gene Gabry 



chain of small, independent meat 
markets that was very big back in 
the 1950s and 1960s," Tingwald 
said. 

Tingwald has been working for 
Schultz Brothers for IB years, 11 
years as the meat manager at 
Zion. 

"Tilings have been going very 
well," Tingwald said of the first 
month. 

Feb. 14 was an inventory day, 
with Feb. 15 the first day the store 
was open to the public under its 



newnamc. 

Tingwald said the two weeks 
of specials were "substantial." 
He said all departments wilt be 
expanded. It has some 140 em- 
ployees. 

Weltons opened the store June 
1,1992. 

— An article appearing in the Feb. , 
25 edition of Lakeland Newspapers 
had incorrectly reported that the 
Welton's store in Muridelein was 
being sold to Jerry Ming of Jerry's 
Parkway. That information is incor- 
rect, The error is regretted. 




Gurnee Piggly Wiggly franchisees Don Tingwald, left, and Jim 
Laewen discuss plans. The store opened under their direction Feb. 
15. It was owned by Welton Management Services since 1992. 



fyf'J 



Winter Wonderland Winter Wonderland 



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Functional shade trees add beauty 



The proper placement of shade 
trees and ornamentals on your property 
should be thought about before the 
planting process begins. You may want 
to ask yourself a few questions, such as 
what Is the purpose of planting a tree In 
a particular site on your property? Will It 
serve a functional purpose? Wlll.lt be for 
aesthetics only? What Is the mature 
size? Do certain trees grow better In wet 
or dry conditions? Should I test my soil 
before planting? This may seem like a 
lot to. think about, however, matching 
the proper tree or trees to your particu- 
lar site is Important and will enable the 
tree to grow at a healthy rate. 

The mighty shade trees are magnifi- 
cent In form throughout the winter, fun 
to view as the tiny leaves emerge In the 
spring and grow to maturity In the sum- 
mer. It's soothing to hear the wind 
move through the treetbps in a summer 
rain and delightful to see the fall color- 
ings of some trees. 

The ornamentals, such as the flower- 
ing Crabs, burst open their -buds to 
show us red, pink and white flowers In 
the spring. A specimen crab has a form 
unmatched In the summer, while "the 
fall and winter show us berries for Inter- 
est. 

These plants add to your gardens 
and bring years of enjoyment, how- 
ever, they also can function well In a 
landscape. Some examples are: They 
help to anchor your home to the 
ground and give your home a feeling 
of belonging; they provide shade for 
your decks and patios, and as they 
mature, for your home Itself. Ornamen- 
tals, especially clump forms, can pro- 
vide you with great privacy hedges 
from uninviting views. Trees can outline 
your property and make the middle of 
your property, If left open, to feel like a 
small park/Smaller, delicate ornamen- 
tals like the Servlceberry and, dwarf 
Magnolia seem to welcome friends 
and neighbors to your home, while 



adding fragrance. 

As trees and ornamentals grow larg- 
er, they provide an overhead plane 
that seems to soothe the senses and 
give one a feeling of being In the gar- 
den. 

Knowing the mature size of the tree 
or ornamental selected Is also Impor- 
tant. Some general guidelines for or- 
namentals such as your flowering 
Crabs, Redbud, Servlceberry and 
Pears, Is a mature height of 20 to 30 feet 
high with a 20 foot spread. Some vari- 
eties of the Pear will get a bit larger 
Your shade trees start at 40 feet high 
and will grow larger with a 35 to 40 foot 
spread on some varieties. 

If you give your plants room, they will 
reward you by growing to their poten- 
tial. If you would like to crowd your 
plantings to create a forested look or 
an instant privacy hedge, this will 
require plants to be closer to one 
another, and will work with proper plan- 
ning and future maintenance consider- 
ations. 

Some ornamentals and trees for wet 
situations are: The ."Whltesplre" and 
"Riversii" Birch; Black Alder; Larch; Red 
Maple; Swamp White Oak; White Oak; 
American Linden; Shadblow Servlce- 
berry; and of course the Willows. 

Some selections for dry locations are: 
The Amur Maple; Norway Maple; 
Hackberry; Green Ash varieties; Honey- 
locust; Llttleleaf Linden; and Poplar. 

There are other selections, however, 
at this time we hope your particular site 
Is fertile, well drained and can offer you 
many more selections than mentioned. 
Most trees like a soil pH of 5.5 to 7.0 and 
will perform well. Most soils In our area 
are at these levels and it shows as you 
look around and view the many vari- 
eties of trees and ornamentals flourish- 
ing In our landscapes.— by MIKE 
GRECO, landscape architect for Mill 
Creek Nursery, Wadsworth, III. 






SATURDAY, MARCH 12, 1994 



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CARS - TRUCKS 

ALL VEHICLES PRICED TO SELL! 



STARTING AT 12 O'CIOCK HIGH! 

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INSPECTION STARTING AT 9 A.M. 
DON'T MISS THE BIGGEST EVENT ON MILWAUKEE 

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MARch 4, 1994 LaIccM Ncws|>a|>ers BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE 




Consultant knows what home buyers want in a 




:| 



}. 



Why docs one home stay on 
the market for months when 
another exactly like it down the 
street sells within , days? 
According to Eileen Hoagl and of 
Sold on Sight the difference Is 
"staging." 

"It's amazing what you can do~ 
with a house/' says Moagland, 
who has done consulting work of 
this kind for 13 years. She began 
with her own home, which sold in 
15 minutes. 

She is celebrating her first 
year as a full-time consultant, 
working with real estate agents 
and homeowners all over the 
North Shore area 

Sometimes, the desired effect 
can be achieved by simply moving 
some furniture. Very often a new 
coat of paint or a carpet-in a neu- 
tral color will make a home more 
inviting to prospective buyers. 

"I go through the home and 
tell people what needs to be done 
top to bottom," she explained. "I 
tell them what to do and why. 
Sometimes they already know 



what they need to do and don't 
want to admit it" 

With a degree in interior 
design and a minor in psycholo- 
gy, Hoagland can counsel home- 
owners in a way that real estate 
agents cannot. Three generations 
of her family were in real estate. 
She combined that interest with 
her knowledge of design to offer 
this unique service. 

Realtors often use her exper- 
tise as a buffer with clients, offer- 
ing to pay for her service to 
enable a home to be sold quickly. 
She arranges for the work to be 
done within a few days in the 
most cost effective manner.' 

"I buy wholesale and sell just 
above wholesale," she said. 

Rearranging the furniture 
sometimes* requires a favorite 
piece to. be consigned to the 
basement, but "people want 
space," she said. "There are so 
many cost effective tricks that will 
make a home more attractive." 

Painting is another inexpen- 
sive way to change, the look of a 



room. If new carpet js called for 
Hoagland usually gives the 
homeowner a choice of light or 
dark beige arid has the resources 
to have it installed within two 
days. 

"People who say tricy don't 
need me arc the ones who need 
me the most," she said. "It's not 
what I like or what you like or 
what's in the house. I do what's 
necessary to sell the house. 

"The seller is happy because 
the house looks the best it can be. 
The Realtor's happy when the 
house sells quickly. I'm happy to 
get the business. The new owners 
arc happy because the house 
looks wonderful." 

Sometimes people move into 
a house and don't know where to 
begin. Hoagland can help there, 
too. She has waved her wand over 
homes throughout the county, 
charging $75 for a consultation 
and arranging for the work to be 
done at the lowest possible cost. 
Sold on Sight can be reached in 
Vernon Hills at 816-0703. 




Above, A cluttered kitchen can be a detraction to a potential 
buyer according to home consultant Eileen Hoagland. Below, 
Hoagland suggested a lighter color for cabinets and putting the 
clutter away. 



Evaluating mutual funds 






One of pur readers asked this , 
question, "Why can't I look for 
the mutual fund that has the 
highest total return over a long 
period of time (10 to 15 years) 
and know that fund would be 
right for my portfolio?" 

This is a very good question 
and the answer is one that every 
investor needs to understand if 
mutual funds are to be part of 
their investment portfolio. 
Unfortunately, evaluating which 
mutual fund is right for you will 
" require ^inpre,, research;:' than.; 
^merely looking at' trie different 
.mutual fund's total return. . 
'-i. First, you must determine the 
right mix of funds ("Asset 
Allocation") will be appropriate 
for your particular situation. This 
will vary depending on many fac- 
tors including your risk tolerance, 
investment time horizon, other 
assets already in your portfolio, 
. income needs, etc . 

Let's assume that you have, 
determined that a growth stock 
• mutual fund is an appropriate 
investment for your portfolio. 
How do you determine which of 
the hundreds of growth stock 
mutual funds is right for you? You 
have narrowed your search down 
to two growth stock funds. Fund 
"A" has had a total annual return 
of 14.5 percent over the past fif- 
teen years and Fund "B" has had 
a total annual return of 15.3 per- 
cent over that same time frame. 

At first glance, this looks like 
an easy decision. Buy Fund "B" 
with the higher 15.3 percent fif- 
teen year average total return, 
right? Not necessarily. 

Let's further assume that you, 
like most of us, arc a conservative 
investor. You know that you can 
not tolerate large swings in your 
investments. In the past, you 
have sold your losing invest- 
ments before they dragged you 
down too far. 

Now lets take a closer look at 
the year to year and better yet, 
the quarter to quarter perfor- 
mance of the above two mutual 
funds. They are as follows: 

Fund "A" by years: best, +31.1 
percent; worst, -9.fi percent; 15 
yr, average, 14.5 percent. Fund 
"A" by quarter, best, +39.8 per- 
cent; worst, -12.6 percent; 15 yr. 
average, 14.5 percent. Fund "B" 
by years: best +42.3 percent; 
worst, -12.6 percent; 15 yr. aver- 



age, 15.3 percent. Fund *B" by 
quarter: best, +63.2 percent; 
worst, -34.8 percent; 15 yr. aver- 
age; 15.3 percent. 

The question that you have to 
ask yourself, is whether you 
would have stayed with Fund "B" 
during the quarter that it lost 34.8 
percent. Many investors would 
have sold that fund during that 
quarter, realized their loss and 
placed their remaining money in 
a "safe" investment, the bank. 
They would never have realized 
the, 15.3 percent average.. total 
return' because they could not 
tolerate the funds volatility. 

On the other hand, that same 
investor would I ikcly"haye stayed 
with Fund "A" particularly if the 
fund's loss quarters were favor- 
able compared to the market as a 



whole. Rather than fleeing to the 
bank where former Fund "B" 
investor is now earning 3.5 per- 
cent, Fund "A" investor will be 
able to-be a long term investor 
and realize long term invest- 
ments results.. 

What this tells you is that you 
must look past total return. You 
need to comprehend what kind 
of ride the investors had along 
the way to that track record. Your 
financial advisor can help you 
with this type of mutual fund 
evaluation.— by TERRANCE R. 
CAERTNER 

Editors • : note: ' Terrance R. 
Gaerther, a Certified Financial 
Planner and Certified Public 
Accountant, is. president of Chicago 
Financial Advisors, Inc., Chicago, a 
financial planning company for indi- 
viduals and business. 





jftt IheWillqws 

^*5M» Or WADSWORTH 

Wadsworth, Illinois 
20 Luxury Homesites from .92 to 4.71 acres 

10 TO BE SOLD ABSOLUTE REGARDLESS OF PRICE* 

Originally priced from $66,000 to $130,000 
Suggested Opening Bids from $30,000 and $40,000 



Developed with vision and respect 
for the environment the Willows of 
Wadsworth combines the following 
and more. ; . 

• Heavily wooded, meadow or 
rolling terrain homesites 

• Close to stables, boating, 
skiing, biking and Illinois Beach 
State Park- 

• Many beautiful homes already 
built and occupied 

• Planned community with 
architectural guidelines to protect 
home values 

• Exceptional public and private 
school system 



Viewing Dates: Sats. & Suns., 

noon to 3 p.m. 

Auction Datci March 20, 1994 

CASHIER'S OR CERTIFIED 
CHECK REQUIRED TO BID 



EXCELLENT FINANCING 
IS AVAILABLE. 



Directional Rt. 41, to Kelly Rd, 
west (1st intersection S. of Rose- 
era ns Rd.) Willows of Wadsworth 
is on the right. Follow the signs to 
the Auction Information Center. 

For brochure and terms of sale, coll: 
; (708) 263-7000 



SlQJMNGOOD&GOMftNY 

Real Estate Auctions, Inc., Affiliate 

Auctioneers Realtors*. Consultants 

333 W. Wacker Drive, Chicago, Illinois 60606 • (312) 346-1500 

Stratcffk Offices Throughout America 







If you misseel our other friendly reminders,* 

D0NT 





ADVICE. 



Don't miss this opportunity to pick our 
brains. And what do you have to lose? It's free! 
We'll help you enhance and define your image 
to gain more customers. Give us a call to 
schedule your free, one hour consultation. 



Logo-agogo 



Advertising /Graphic Services 

(708)223-8167 

Ad Campaigns • Logos • Identity Pieces 
Designed & Produced 




1 OBITUARIES UkclANd Newspapers Munch 11, 1994 





Lakeland 

Newspapers 






;. 






Joseph W. Bicek 

Age 79 of Lake Villa, IL* formerly of Chicago, IL, 
beloved husband of Alice (nee Zellbor), dear father of 
Jane of Oakland, CA and Joseph Jr. of Lake Villa, IL 
passed away March 4, 1994. In keeping with his wishes, 
funeral services were private. Interment at Ascension 
Cemetery, Llberiyvlllc, IL 




BACZEWSKI 

Philip T. Baczewskl, 74, of 

Lake Villa, IL Am Strang 

Funeral Home, Antloch, IL 

BENSON 

Michael C. Benson, 62, of 

Elgin, IL Am O'Connor & 

Homeler Funeral Home, 

Elgin, IL 

BICEK 

Joseph W. Bicek, 79, of 

Lake Villa, IL Am Strang 

Funeral Home, Antloch, IL 

BOWMAN 

Collette M. Bowman, 77, 

formerly of Libertyvtllc, IL 

Air. McMurrough Chapel, 

Ubertyvllle, IL 

GECIAS 

Edward P. Geclas, 75, of 

Ingleside, IL. Am K.K. 

Hamsher Funeral Home, 

Fox Lake, IL 

GEERDTS 

Lcnore Geerdts, 95, of 

Mundelein, IL. Am 

Krisian Funeral Home, 

Mundelein, IL 

GLANERT 

George W. Glanert, 55, 
USN Retired, of Lake Villa, 
IL. Arr: Strang Funeral 
Chapel, Grayslake, IL 

GRAHAM 

Bob Graham, 78, of 
Hazelhurst, IL, formerly 
of Ingleside, IL. Arr: 
Boiger Funeral Home, 

Minacqua, WI. 

IANSEN 

Marie Jansen, 91, of 
Ingleside, IL Arr Strang 
Funeral : Chapel. 

Grayslake, IL. 



JOHNSON 

Mae J. Johnson, 66, of 

Round Lake Beach, IL Am 

Strang Funeral Chapel, 

Grayslake, IL 

KEARNS 

William J. Keams, 58, of 

Lindenhurst, IL Arn 

Strang Funeral Home, 

Antloch, IL 

WPP 

William W. Klpp, 63, of 

Mundelein, IL Arn Kristan 

Funeral Home, 

Mundelein, IL. 

KNACKSTEDT 

Irene A. Knackstedt, 87, of 

Antloch, IL Arn Strang 

Funeral Home, Antioch, IL 

LOWEY 

Joseph C. Lowey, 76, of 

Llbertyville, IL Arn 

Burnett-Dane Funeral 

Home, Llbertyville, IL. 



LUCARZ 

Josephine S. Lucarz, 79, of 

Ingleside, IL Arr. K.K. 

Hamsher Funeral Home, 

Fox Lake, IL 

McFADDEN 

Donald B. McFaddcn, 77, 

of Round Lake, IL Arn 

Strang Funeral Chapel, 

Grayslake, IL 

MICHAELSON 

John 0. MIchaelson, 58, of 

Zlon, IL . Arn Marsh 

Funeral Home, 

Waukegan, IL 

MITCHELL 

Elsie T. Mitchell, 85, of 

Wauconda, IL. Arn 

Kissel burg- Wauconda 

Funeral Home, 

Wauconda, IL 




CARMIE MOLOSE-BOU- 

DREAU OF Downers Grove, 
IL would like to thank all 
friends, neighbors and every- 
one for your kind Ihoughis and 
condolences with the passing 
of my husband, Stanley Bou- 
dreau. 




NEWTON 

Aldean G. Newton, 84, of 
Llbertyville, IL. Arn 
Burnett-Dane Funeral 
Home, Llbertyville, IL 
PETERSON 

Margarethe M. Peterson, 
69, of Round Lake, IL Arn 
Justens Round Lake 
Funeral Home, Round 
Lake, IL 
STOKER 

Walter Stuker, 63, of 
Grayslake, IL Am Strang 
Funeral Chapel, 

Grayslake, IL 
STURDEVANT 
Dorothy E. Sturdevant, of 
Llbertyville, IL Arr 
Private. 



The Deadline 
for Obituaries 

and 

Death Notices 

is 5 p.m. 

on 
Tuesday. 



Justen's Round Lake Funeral Home 



222 North Rosedale Court 
Round Lake, Illinois 60073 

708/546-3300 

Our full-service Funeral Home offers: 
•pre-arrangement planning 
•pre-funded funerals 
•traditional services 
•contemporary services 
•customized services 




Funeral Director and Owner 

Mark L. Justen 

Serving Round Lake for over 30 years 



George R. Justen & Son Funeral Home 

3519 West Elm Street, McHcnry 



Justen's Wonder Lake Funeral Home 

761 1 Hancock Drive, Wonder Lake 



Sometimes an o[<f»fas£ionecf song 
Darings us a i£oug£t of gou; 
Sometimes a flower as we pass along, 
Or a s£g that is azure ofuej 
Or a silver fining in i£e cfouos, 
W£en i£e sun is peeping i£roug£ 
0?//of/£ese tilings, maJte 
us /£in£ofyou. 



SINCE DAD DIED MOM 

HASN'T BEEN HERSELF. 

HOW LONG DOES IT TAKE 

TO GET OVER THE DEATH 

OF A LOVED ONE? 

Questions like this are hard to answer because everyone reacts to 
the loss of a loved one a little differently. In general we can expect 
the first year after a death to be most trying. After all, we face each 
anniversary, birthday and holiday for the first time without our loved 
family member or friend. These events will' be a reminder of our 
loss and may leave us feeling down or blue. The second year with- 
out the deceased may be a bit easier but we can't ever expect to 
completely forget the love we had. Usually, as the bereaved person 
gets farther away from the death, and as they learn to do more, 
things on their own and with others, they will begin to feel better. 

& - Tusie#al - /lam£> Jzicl. 



T 



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feS£ 






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wm 



".?*» VAafvte* (At <*'***• 



12 N. Plstakee Lake Road, Fox Lake, Illinois 
Phone: (708)587-2100 • (815)385-1001 




SERVE EVERYONE 



I 






LEGAL NOTICES 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 









\ 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

Woodland School Community Consolidated District 50 is 
seeking bids for: 
REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS FOR ANNUAL AUDITS 

Specifications may be obtained from William M. 
Linning, Assistant Superintendent of Business Services, 
at the District Office, 17370 W. Gages Lake Road, Gages 
Lake, IL 60030. 

Bids are to be turned in on or before 2:00 PM 
Thursday, March' 24, 1994 to the above address. The bid 
opening will take place at Central Office, 17370 W. Gages 
Lake Rd., Gages Lake, IL 60030. ■ 

The Board of Education reserves the right to reject any 
or all bids, to waive irregularities and to accept that bid 
which is considered to be in the best interest of the 
District. Any such decision shall be considered final. 

0394B-522-Gen 
March 11, 1994 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
BID NOTICE 

The Fox Lake Grade School District 114 will receive 
sealed bids for a cleaning service during the 1994-95 
school year for its four buildings. 

Bids will be accepted until Friday, April 22, 1994 at the 
Administrative Office, 17 N. Forest Ave., Fox Lake IL 
60020 until 12:50 PM and opened at 1:00 PM at the 
Administrative Office on that same date. Specifications 
may be picked up at the Administrative Office. 

The Board of Education reserves the right to reject any. 
and ail bids or to accept the bid which best serves the 
interest of the District. 

Marie Drehobl. Secretary 0394B-514-Gen 

.Board of Education March 11, 1994 

Fox Lake Grade School 
District 114 



LEGAL NOTICE 
PUBLICATION IS EASY AND CONVENIENT IN LAKELAND NEWSPAPERS 

An Invitation is extended to public bodies, attorneys, businesses and private dtlzera to use the pub- 
lications of Lakeland Newspapers for convenient, etllclent and economical publication required for 
Legal Notice by the State ot Illinois statutes. 
Legal notices may be placed In person at our centrally located business office, 30 S. Whitney St., 
Grayslake, 60030, or sent by mall or FAX, 708-223-8810. The telephone number b 708-223-8161. 
The 13 community newspaper publications of Lakeland Newspapers meet all the statutory require- 
ments for Legal Notice in Lake County, IS. Our rates' are economical and our deadline Is the latest En 
Lake County. We regularly provide publication service under the tightest time restrictions. 
The Lakeland staff Is experienced In the unique requirements (or Public Notice. We are ready to assist 
wtth your questions and all your Public Notloe needs. For questions and rate Information, please can 
Chris Kenyon at 708-223-8 161 . Let us serve you with Legal Notice publication. Thank you. 

i The Publisher 
Lakeland Newspapers 









■ 



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1 



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a 





>tn ylrea Guide to Home Design, Remodeling and Real Estate 



U E MpNTh • — — 

Large decks and windows showcase water, nature in Lake Villa home 



Because he is a realtor, it's no surprise that Phil Fabry knows what he 
wants in a house. His Ghesney Shores home on Fox Like exemplifies the rela- 
tionship he and many other waterfront property owners have with the Chain o' 
Lakes. 

Building a home from scratch enabled Phil and wife Sue to give form to 



From the toko, this unincorporated Lake Villa 
house looks like a three story estate. 



this special relationship. They started with a plot of lakefront land containing 
a 150-year-old oak tree. The next step was to choose an exterior house plan 
that would highlight the natural landscape. To preserve the tree, the couple ( 
reduced the plan's rear walkouts from four to two, and contractors were 
ordered to stop work if they ran into the tree's root systems. 

With five grown children, the Fabrys were free to 
modify the interior plans to suit their own needs. 
"We wanted an open, airy, contemporary home," 
said Phil, "and we wanted visitors to appreciate the 
lake." 

To this end, front door guests arc greeted by an 
unobstructed view of Fox Lake through the house. A 
high cathedral ceiling soars to a crystal chandelier in 
the foyer, which is separated from the living room by 
a free-standing closet. 

Visitors will also immediately notice the extensive 
use of decorative house plants. 

"We were very much into a natural feeling, inside 
and out," said Fabry. "The plants brought a little nat- 
ural green inside." 

Colors throughout the house are subdued, earthy 
tones. An oak hardwood floor runs from the 
See HOME pagcCa 





fesi 



'\$ 



-r;:; 



| From the street, the home becomes a modest contemporary. | | Story and Photos 

iy BltlfMRMODY-Jr^ 




Extensive window area and 
the two level cedar deck 
allow visitors to fully appre- 
ciate Fox Lake beyond. 




In This Issue 

\ Dream home survey 

\ Durable paint jobs 
A Build a bookcase 



4 Deck protection 






fl AT HOME UWancI Newsj>a|)crs MahcIi 11, 1994 



. 



<■■■->:•: <':U 




Home 



From page C7 

entrance to the kitchen, mirroring the cus- 
tom oak furnishings in the living room, all 
built by Phil's brother at Red Rock 
Enterprises. A powder blue carpet in the 
living room underscores the mauve 
accents of the curtains and adjacent din- 
ing room. 

The living room is modular, emphasiz- 
ing the fireplace in winter, and in summer 
directing attention to the dual sets of slid- 
ing doors and the decks and lake beyond. 
Hie two tiered cedar decks feature two 
octagonal pinnacles jutting outward 
around the massive oak. 

"We've held pre-wedding 
parties for two daughters here," 
said Fabry. "There's been 60 or 
70 people out on the decks, with 
no overcrowding." 

The lower deck opens into the 
basement through dual sets of 
sliding doors. The basement 
has been turned into a family 
room, complete with dart 
boards and billiard table. 

The house has been designed 
as a three-bedroom, three- 
bathroom home. The master 
and guest bedrooms both face 
Fox Lake through multiple win- 
dows, and the third has been 
converted into Phil's home 
office. Another change was 
made to the master bedroom. 

"There's an eight-foot walk-in 
closet for my wife, and I have a 
standard two-door closet," said 
Fabry. 

The airy master bath features 
a skylight and whirlpool, both 
Fabry modifications. 

"That was the trend in the 
market, toward bigger baths 
and Jacuzzis," said Fabry. "So 
we added those ourselves." 

The couple wanted a home 
that fit in harmony with its envi- 
ronment. The professionally 
landscaped yard incorporates 
an in-ground sprinkler system 



to ensure a healthy look. They worked 
with the landscapcr to incorporate the 
deck, terrace work, and planting to come 
together as a unit, As a iakefront, hillside 
house, the street side of the home is mod- 
est and contemporary. The lake side is ah 
open, many-windowed three story estate. 
• "We were very cognizant of having our 
rooms face the water," said Fabry, adding 
that some lake homes tend to follow more 
conventional, Inland designs. "We wanted 
a lot of glass." 

As much as it reflects their personal 
tastes and love of lake life, the Fabrys 



aren't finished tailoring their home yet.. 
Up next on the couple's list of improve- 
ments arc an outdoor hot tub and base- 
ment fireplace. The changes may not take 
place any time soon, however. 

"When we get home in the summer, we 



don't even spend much time 1 in the 
house," explained Fabry. "It's much nicer 
to Sit on the deck or take off in the boat 
with friends." 

Which is as it should be, since the house 
was built to showcase the lake. 





A soaring cathedral colling gives a sense of airiness to the foyer and living room. 
Tiered crystal chandeliers highlight both areas. The Fabrys employ oak furnishings 
and tropical plants to bring a sense of the outdoors Inside. 



Ah Investment 






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MarcIi 11,1994 UkUwd Newspapers AT HOME WM 




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With Hvo grown children, the Fabry* 
wore able to redesign the Interior floor 
plan to their needs. One of the bed- 
rooms became Phil's home office. The 
finished basement Is now a recreation 
room, with two sets of sliding, doors 
leading to the rear patio. Oak furnish- 
ings, Including many custom designed 
pieces, grace the dining and living 
room. Multiple windows and a skylight 
In the ad|acent master bath lend a feel- 
ing of openness to the master bedroom. 



FIVESTAR 

INTERIOR FIAT LATEX 




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clean-up. Dries in 2 hoursriH 6644-54 



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Washable, easy water clean-up. #16389-92 



Topcoat in 2 hours. Seals and primes. Use 
under oil or latex. Alkali resistant. Dries 
quickly. Provides uniform finish. #16589 



FREE ACE PAINT 

COMPUTER 
COLOR MATCHING 

Our computer driven ACE paintmaker will 

duplicate any color quickly and precisely 

right in our store. Just bring in a fabric 

swatch, a bit of wallcovering, a piece of 

carpet- alomost anything. Even another 

manufacturers color chip. So donl settle for 

color that's not quite right, come to the 

Paintin' Place! Ace Hardware., your one 

stop place to shop 




ROUND LAKE LIBERTYVILLE GURNEE ROUND LAKE BEACH MUNDELEIN 



LAKEHURST 



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HOME | 
CENTER 1 



546-4668 



STORE HOURS: 



362-3340 



Grand Ave. 



336-0101 



RolinsRd. 




Rt. 120 



rx 



223-0190 



566-1100 



473-0320 



DAILY 8:00-9 (U*ehurst opens at 8:30) 
SATURDAY 8:00-6:00 



SUNDAY 8:30-5:00 




Wa reserve the right to limit quantities and correct printing 
errors. All rebates subject to manufacturers stipulations. 




1 AT HOME LaIccIancJ Newspapers MaucU 11 , 1 994 







Attractive bookcase is easy, inexpensive weekend project 



If you have Just two feet of wall 
space somewhere in your home, you, 
have room for this handsome 
bookcase or knlckknack shelf, I 
measures five feet high by two feet 
wide and the shelves are nearly six 
Inches deep— plenty of room to store 
your paperback books and tapes or 
display your special antique collection. 

The bookcase is made from 
versatile, east to work^ Western 
softwood lumber so It goes together 
simply with professional looking results. 
And because the wood Is the only 
major building material that comes 
from a renewable resource, It's a good 
choice for the environment, too. 

Western lumber takes naturally to a 
variety of finishes, ranging from deep, 
rich wood tones to the lighter frultwood 
and driftwood shades. For a true 
country look, build the shelf with knotty 
pine and use a clear, natural finish. 



The project requires no special tools 
or woodworking skill and can easily be 
completed In a weekend. Shelves may 
be attached with 6d finishing nails or 1 
1 /2 Inch screws. For a more finished 
appearance, countersink the screws 
and conceal them with a wood 
button. 

To build the shelf, you will need 46 
feet of 1x6 and four feet of 1x8 Western 
lumber. (For deeper shelves, use 46 
feet of 1 x8 and four feet of 1 xl 0.) 

Cut two lengths of 1x6 for the sides, 
each 59 1/2 Inches long. For the 
shelves, cut seven lengths of 1x6, each 
20 1/2 Inches long. Attach the top and 
bottom shelves flush with the ends of 
the side pieces, using carpenter's glue 
and two nails or screws at each end. 
Space the remaining shelves nine 
Inches apart. Mark the position of the 
shelves before Installing, then measure 
to be sure they are spaced evenly. 




PRE SEASON A/C SALE 



BaMfe* A 

New Nome Or 

Sign Up In March For An A/C Installation & Receive f ^emorfe/ing?- 

A "FREE" AprllAIre 550 Humidifier or Setback f 5 a ['Jj* Tb<ty For 

Thermostat All units come with a 5 yr. warranty. . 



A Johnson Air Conditioning, Refrigeration & Heating 

587-4676 

SS Serving All Makes & Models. Serving All Of Lake County 



Expires 
3-31-94 



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WINDOW & WALL CONCEPTS 

827 E. Center St. • Graphite • 223-3267 

t 

For The Latest In Window Fashions 



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•CUSTOM DRAPERIES 
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•Rewrse Osroos* Drinking Water 
•Botlled Wiler Delivery Service 
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Wi uconda, IL 60084 
J -800-640-0061 



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Install with glue and nails or screws. 

Cut four lengths of 1 x6 for the back, 
each 59 1/2 Inches long. After the 
shelves are Installed, turn the unit face 
down on a flat surface, making sure It Is 
square. Arrange the 1x6s across the 
back so they are flush with the top, 
bottom and side; attach with glue and 
6d finishing nails or screws. 

Cut the 1x8 Into two lengths, each 
two feet long. Position them on the top 
and bottom of the bookcase so they 
are flush with the back and centered 
from side to side; attach -with 6d 
finishing nails. 

The optional cornice Is cut from a 
22-Inch length of 1 x6. Use a jigsaw to 
cut the decorative design, then attach 
It to the face of the unit with 6d 



finishing nails or with screws and wood 
buttons. 

After sanding, finish the unit with 
stain, paint or a clear topcoat. 



Materials list (for one storage box) 

46 linear feet of 1x6 Western 

lumber 

4 linear feet of 1x8 Western lumber 

A half pound of 6d finishing nails 

(or use 30-36 1 1/2 wood screws) 

Carpenter's glue 

Sandpaper (coarse and medium 

grades) 

Your choice of finishing materials 

Tools list: 

Hand or power saw 

Hammer or screwdriver 

Tape measure 

Carpenter's square 

Jigsaw (optional; for the cornice) 




1,0% 



Pi 

I 



This multi-tiered display shelf takes up 
less than two square feet of floor 
space, yet will hold an Impressive 
array of books and tapes or 
collectibles. And the best news Is you 
can build it yourself In a weekend with 
renewable, versatile Western lumber. 



Open 7 Days 
A W eekl 

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(£jn»t of Sttcriclan Rd. 

Acroaa from Bowcn Park** 

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Transitional 
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3 Piece Set 

•Sofa 'Chair 

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Glass-Topped Tables with 
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Match 1 1,.1??4 UkUNd Newspapers AT HOME 






LaHHmd 



ffig 



Decks need protection of high-performances finishes 



It's easy to understand why the 
deck has become America's favorite 
yard feature. No matter, the wood used 
for- Its construction, If blends well with 
the landscape, Its texture Is always 
pleasing, and It Is endlessly flexible. It 
can be casual or elegant, rustic or so- 
phisticated. It can be a simple platform 
or a multi-level extravaganza. And It 
associates easily with steps and fences 
In any landscaping plan. . 

But don't forget that wood needs 
to be protected from sun, rain and 
other harsh conditions. According to 
experts, It's not difficult to protect a 
deck, but It pays to find out what 
products can do what and then select 
the right one for a specific situation. 

A deck can represent a sizable In 
vestment, and it makes sense to take 
care of It. Fortunately, we now have 



high-performance cleaners, sealants, 
preservatives and stains that make It 
easy to keep decks looking good for 
longer than ever before. 
Heeding sun and rain 

Enemies of wood Include UV ra- 
diation from the sun, water, mildew, 
algae and termites, but there are 
products to handle every one of them. 

Unprotected wood will check, warp 
and turn gray or discolor If unprotected 
from the weather. Even the deck built 
of redwood, cedar or pressure-treated 
wood will suffer from weathering 
defects unless It Is. protected. And to 
look Its best, a deck should be bright- 
ened up every few years. But don't 
worry. With a sprayer this Is no big task. 
Cleanliness counts 

The- one common denominator In 
deck protection Is cleanliness. Before 



you apply any finishes, sand off brand 
or carpenter marks on new wood and 
patch holes and cracks on an older 
deck With wood filler. Sand any 
patched areas and glossy surfaces to 
make It easier for the new topcoat to 
adhere. 

A deck 1hat extends over a lake or 
waterfront Is always glamorous, but its 
footings require special care. Use a 
product engineered especially to pro- 
tect wood that meets water or soil from. 
rot, termites and wood-boring Insects, 
and mildew. 
Color creativity 

If you want weather and wear pro- 
tection that goes beyond the natural 
wood look, look for a semi-transparent 
stain. They let the grain and texture 
show, but add beautifully subtle color. 

Colors range from the mellow 



mood of Natural Honey and the pale 
tones we associate with Northern 
birches to Pepperwood, a dramatic 
charcoal hue, and Olive Tree, the 
deep green of Mediterranean groves. 

If the deck Is attached to* the 
house, Its color should harmonize with 
the rooms Inside as well as with the 
exterior siding. What colors you choose 
Is strictly a question of taste, but do 
consider that pale colors tend to be 
cooler, while darker tones retain heat. 

For a deck that's truly an outdoor 
living room, you might consider staining 
part of the floor in a rug pattern. The 
geometric patterns typical of the 
American Indian are especially easy to 
duplicate, and executed In the nature 
hues of wood stains they are Just right 
for outdoors.— by US KING 



Safety tips for using air-powered fastening tools 



As with all tools. It's Important to take 
the proper safety precautions when 
using air-powered nailers and staplers. 
Following are several safety tips: 

•Read the operating manual thor- 
oughly. 

•Outfit yourself with the proper safe- 
ty gear. This Includes approved OSHA- 
approved safety glasses with side 
shields, as well as head and hearing 
protection. 

•Keep your finger off the trigger 
.when not driving fasteners. 

,. -Keep the tool pointed away from 
yourself and others. 

•Connect your tool only to clean. 



dry, regulated air. Bottled gases can 
cause your tool to explode. 

•Don't use air pressure In excess of 
the maximum recommended by the 
manufacturer. 

•Inspect and clean your tool dally. If 
parts are missing, damaged or working 
improperly, don't use the tool. 

•If a fastener. Jam should occur, 
always disconnect the tool before 
doing maintenance or If you're taking 
a break. 

•Pay close attention to where you 
are firing your tool. Don't fire the tool 
Into surfaces too hard for the fastener 
to penetrate. 




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•mm 




AT HOME UkelANd Newspapers Match 11, 1994 



Take 1994 Dream Home survey 



Experts In any field are generally tn 
heavy demand. That's a given. 

But what you may not realize Is that 
you're an expert of sorts when it comes 
to home design. And you're the 
foremost expert when It comes to 
selecting the features and amenities 
you would Include (and leave out) of 
the home of your dreams. Nobody else 
can provide that Information with any 
degree of certainty. 

So once a year, Landmark Designs 
In partnership with Lakeland 
Newspapers invites readers to share 
their expertise by participating In a 
Dream Home survey. The form at right, 
makes the process easy and fun, 
whether you're planning to build a 
home or not. it Includes the same types 
of questions architects, designers and 
real estate agents ask to determine 



their clients' wants and needs. 

Feel free to attach letters, sketches 
and any comments or Inspirations that 
come to mind. Throughout the 17 years 
Landmark has been designing homes, 
readers have always been one of the 
richest sources of new Ideas. So don't 
be shy, the more detailed, the better. 

After the results are . tallied, 
Landmark will design a national 1994 
Dream Home. In addition/because 
area preferences vary widely, 
Landmark will also custom design a 
home to meet the exact specifications 
selected by readers of this 
newspapers. Where response Is high, 
Landmard will come up with three 
plans— small, medium and large. 

Mall forms to Landmark Designs, 
P.O. Box 2307-DLP60, Eugene, OR 
97402. 



* 



Paint & Decorating Center 

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Window Treatments In-Home 

Always Discounted Decorating Service 




Extra Large Selection Of Wallpaper Books 
Specially Priced For Spring 10-50% 0ff 



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1994 DREAM HOME SURVEY 

GENERAL INFORMATION 
Type of home 

□ One Story □ 1-1/2 Story (Attic) □ Two Story □ Split Level □Basement 



Size of home 

□ Smalt up to 1500 square feet 

□ Large 2501 to 3500 square feet 

Budget for home (land excluded) $ 

Lot location 

□ City □ Country 



□ Medium 1501 to 2500 square feet 

□ Extra Large 3500 & up square feet 



□ View Property 



Exterior Style 

□ Contemporary □Country □Spanish □ Ranch 

□ Period Architecture (choose one): 

□ Colonial □ Victorian □ Tudor 



Exterior material 

□ Brick □ Stone 



□ Other . 

□ Other. 



Garage 
Cars 



□ Wood □ Stucco □Other 

□ Shop :□ Storage 



□ RV parking 



LIVING AREAS 

In addition to kitchen and living area, I would like the following rooms in my home: 

□ Formal entry □ Formal dining □ Recreation □ Family room 

□ Media room □ Exercise •" Q Office QDcn 

□ Guest suite □ Library □ Utility □ Nursery 
Number of bedrooms Numberof baths 

Other rooms '. ' : ' 



KITCHEN FEATURES 
Style and shape 

□ Country □ U-shaped 

Amenities 

□ Breakfast nook □ Pantry 

□ Appliance center □ Island 

□ Garden window □ Freezer 



□ Walk-thru □ Other 



□ Eating bar □ Recycling center 

□ Double oven □ Trash compactor 

□ Grill □ Other ~ 



MASTER SUITE FEATURES 

□ Isolated from OR □ Adjacent to other bedrooms □ Patio □ Sitting room 

□ Private bath with the following features: 

□ Tub/shower □Bathtub . □ Shower □ Oversized tub 

□ Two wash basins □ Skylight □Bidet □ Other 



$ 249. fla Installed 



#50 Relay if needed S 30. M | 

Honeywell Programmable y 
T8600 Thermostat , 

. $ 125. fitt 



10% Senior Citizen Discount 






SPECIAL REQUESTS 

□ Fireplace , □Woodstove □ Spa 

□ Computer center □Deck/Patio □Atrium 

□ Vaulted ceilings □ Skylights Q Other _ 



□ Indoor pool 

□ Security system 



I would conserve energy by taking advantage of: 

□ Minima] windows □ Passive solar □ Active solar □ Extra insulation 



DEMOGRAPHICS 

Number in household . 



Age 



Marital status 



Do you own a home? □ Yes □ No Are you going to build a home? QYcs □ No 




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Design development important 
as initial design concept 



Following the design process, which 
takes your Initial Ideas and turns them 
Into a preliminary plan. Is the equally 
Important design development stage. 
During this stage the preliminary design 
Is manipulated Into a completed form, 
to be represented on the construction 
drawings. 

While the architect Is coordinating 
the technical aspects of the project, 
he will also be asking you to select the 
finish materials. If you envision any 
room, you will observe that every 
surface has a finish material. There Is 
either carpeting, tile or wood on the 
floor. The walls either have paint or a 
wall covering. Everything that Is builMa 
such as cabinets, appliances, 
plumbing fixtures,- and. ceramic file all 
have colors, and they all have different 
characteristics that you have to select. 

It has been my experience that a 
project's success Is directly 
proportionate to' the amount of work 
accomplished during this phase. 
Incomplete selections will usually result 
In cost extras and time delays. This 
phase can require you to make a large 
commitment of time, as the decisions 
could number Into the hundreds. 

to a large extent; the cost of the 
project as well as the time length will 
be determined during design 
development. The choice of finish 
Items can range from opulent to 
economy, with all stops in between. 



Thus, the project cost can rise 
dramatically, or be closely controlled, 
depending upon your selections. 

Delivery schedules can also be 
affected due to materials not being 
Immediately available. Everyone 
knows a story when a certain finish, 
expected In four to six weeks, ends up 
taking 12 to 14 weeks, and ruins a 
project's timetable. 

When choosing these finishes, you 
will often be selecting from catalogs or 
even worse, photocopies of catalogs. 
To avoid surprises view your choices In 
person. Although It takes time and 
legwork.'the effort Is worthwhile for the 
materials whose appearance and 
functions are Important to you. While 
you are visiting these showrooms, get ' 
catalogs for future reference as well as 
samples for color or. texture. 

It is Important to document all 
selections. In any large project you and 
your building professionals must have 
good written communications. All your 
selections should be recorded In, 
writing for review and for the record.— 
by RICHARD PREVES 

Editor's note: Richard Proves Is a 
principal of Richard Provos and 
Associates and a registered architect 
with membership In the American 
Institute of Architects. For more 
Information contact Proves at 977 
Lakevlew Pkwy., Vernon Hills, IL 60061. 



American National Bank 

ofLibertyville 

announces its great 

Equity Credit Line 

deal/ 



\Sf No closing costs. 

\Sf No application fee* 

H*No annual fee the first yean 

EFLow interest rate based on total 

equity credit line* 
\Sf Tax-deductible interest 



Look around at other banks, and You'll prob-, 
ably find an Equity Credit Line with some of these 
advantages. But, with an Equity Credit Line from 
American National Bank of Libertyville, you get 
them ail- 
So affordable, you can't afford to pass it up. 

Right now, there're no closing costs, no fee to 
apply and no annual fee for the first year. 

When you borrow, there's a, money-saving 
difference. We determine your interest rate by the 
size of your credit line, not by how much you 
borrow. Rates can be as low as Prime* As you -. 
know, Prime is at the lowest it's been in years. 



And don't forget the possible savings on 
April 15.The interest you pay may be fully tax- 
deductible. (Please consult your tax advisor.) 

American National also offers a fixed-rate 
Home Equity Loan with fixed monthly payments 
and no closing costs. See a Personal Banker 
for details. " 

You can't afford to wait too long. 

We don't think you'll find a better deal. But 
hurry, this is a limited offer available only until 
April 15, 1994. Stop in either Libertyville office 
today, or call us at (708) 816-4000. 




Member FD1C 



American National Bank 

ofLibertyville 

I20I S. MikuuJW HO W. Cook/ Liiertjwlk ftfiruw 600467(7081 8/6-4000 



t£MXH 



MabcIi 1 1, 1994 LAkclANd Newspapers AT HOME p |' * 




•Your annual percentage rale (APR) varies baaed upon the current prime rate as publishedth the Money Rale Sedlonof Tkt Walt Strut 
Journal, Any changes In the prime rale will take effect on the lint day of the nert month. The prime rale on 03/07/M was 6.0% and 
your APR coutd have been between 6.0* and 7S% depending on your credit line. The maximum APR that can apply Is 18*. After the 
first year, an annual fee of $25 will be charged. Final approval depends on your credit standing, household Income, financial record 
and current appraisal of your home. We require that you any Insurance on the property that secures this plan. 



GET YOUR NEW QUALITY CABINETS & 
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fl AT HOME UkeUNcJ Newspapers. Maim* 11, 1994 



■*i 




*!?■&&:£»:■-"; ;■;<;: 




Durable paint jobs begin with proper surface prep 



Any professional painter will agree 
that surface preparation Is the most 
Important step In the painting process. 
Without adequate surface prep, new 
paint Is doomed to fall. On the other 
hand, proper surface prep will make 
new paint look better and last much 
longer, so you won't have to repaint as 
often. 

Here are eight Important tips offered 
by experts for better painting results, 
whatever household surface you're 
painting: 

1 . Clean the painting surface thor- 
oughly with a pre-palnt cleaner. Dirt, 
mildew and oily stains prevent new 
paint from adhering to the old surface. 
For big outdoor Jobs, consider a high- 
pressure sprayer and a cleaning mix- 
ture containing a mlldewclde. 

2. Scrape off peeling, chipped 
paint, or stTlp It oft If layers of old paint 



obscure decorative wood work. For 
stripping, choose a palnt'remover 
carefully, as most removers are made 
for specific applications, 

3. When painting over enamel or 
other shiny surfaces, first "degloss* the 
finish with a deglosslng product or sand 
It lightly to help the new paint adhere 
better. 

4. If the surface you plan to paint 
has water stains, crayon marks, etc., 
use a quality primer/sealer to stop 
bleed through. Also use a primer/sealer 
when making a drastic color change. 

5. Rather than paint over wallpaper, 
It's much better to remove the old 
wallpaper and paint on the original 
surface. A good quality spray-on 
wallpaper remover dissolves wallpaper 
paste so the paper peels off easily. 

6. For metal surfaces, first remove 
rust and chipped paint. To get rid of 



rust completely, choose a product that 
dissolves It, like Naval Jelly or Rust 
Kutter,' then follow up with a product 
that prevents new rust formation. 

7. When painting outdoor concrete 
or masonry that has never been 
painted, clean thoroughly with a con- 
crete cleaning product, then use a 
palntable sealer as a primer. 



8. When painting bare, weathered 
outdoor wood (decks, fences, etc.), 
first clean It with a product that re- 
moves grime and mildew. Then apply 
a wood preservative to prevent boring 
Insects and bacterial growth. Next, use 
a quality primer that will soak Into the 
wood and create an excellent 
painting surface. '■ 



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Lighting Fixtures •Electrical Supplies •Lamp Repairs 

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Versatile family room is center of today's honie 



Family rooms for roal people 

The family room Is the center of 
today's home, it Is the place where 
families get together to ; watch 
television, listen to music, work on the 
computer, do homework, eat, pay bills 
and entertain Informally. With all of 
these functions, the family room must 
be a truly versatile room that stands up 
to a lot of wear and tear. Since It Is the 
room where you spend the most time, 
you want It to look great, feel 
comfortable, and reflect your lifestyle. 

Happily, the home furnishings 
Industry has made great strides In* 
providing the function and durability 
todays homeowners require, In a 
variety of styles suitable for any decor. 

Upholstery fabrics are more durable 
and stain resistant than ever. We've 
come a long way from the boring 
upholstery fabrics of the eighties, and 
today's fabrics took great and are easy 
to care for, too. 

Does your family room have 
panelled walls that you are Itching to 
replace? Often, you can cover 
panelling with a wall liner and 
wallcovering, without going to the 
trouble and mess of ripping off the old 
panelling." Arid today's t wallcoverlngs 
come In a beautiful array of vinyls that 
are washable as well as beautiful. 

It seems like the carpet Industry 
makes new advances In fiber 
technology every year. Many carpets 
possess stain resistant characteristics 
and are heat set so the carpet wears 
well, but also keep in mind your family's 



comfort. If you have children, they are 
apt to He on the floor just as soon as sit 
on a sofa. Some fibers, like 
polypropelene, feel very 

uncomfortable to the touch. On the 
other hand, polyester feels extremely 
soft. Weigh the pros and cons of 
carpet fibers before you make your 
decision. 

If you have struggled with trying to 
find a place for the television, cable 
box, VCR, and stereo, look no further. 
The entertainment center can hold 
them all. If you still haven't Invested In 
one, you'll be happy to know that 
entertainment centers are made to suit 
any style, from traditional to 
contemporary. Make a list of your 
needs, and be sure to check the 
dimensions of your television before 
you begin shopping for an 
entertainment center. Measure the 
outside and Inside doorways to be sure 
they will allow for delivery- 
entertainment "centers come In some 
pretty hefty sbesj 
The cover story 

Buying a sofa or any piece of 
upholstered furniture can be a tlme- 
consumfng project and sometimes a 
costly experience, you want to buy a 
sofa to last a long time/ but you don't 
want to compromise aesthetics In 
order to achieve only durability. It has 
to (more or less) accommodate the 
kids and the cats without causing 
embarrassment when you are 
entertaining your adult guests. Keep In 
mind that your upholstered furniture will 



be your companion for many years. 

First of all, you should consider 
where it will be placed In the home 
and how much and what type of use It 
wlllget. A family room sofa gets a lot of 
hard use and the fabric on It should be 
durable. Cottons have long been the 
fabric of choice by upholsterers. 
Today's man-made fibers have also 
added to upholstery fabrics' selection. 
Many times these man-made fibers, 
such as rayon and polyester, are used 
In combination with cotton to provide 
the look, as well as the function you 
desire. For furniture that's sure to get a 
tot of use, you might consider selecting 
a fabric that's been treated with a soli 
and stain repetlant. This will help the 
fabric keep Its fresh appearance much 
lonaor 

But. durability Isn't the first 
consideration for a fabric on a dressy, 
very-seldom used living room sofa. The 
color and pattern of the fabric you 
select must coordinate with the room's 
other furnishings and decorating 
scheme. Whatever the room, the 
fabric you choose shouW go well with 
the style and lines of the furniture. For 
example, you wouldn't want to put a 
dressy damask fabric on an informal 
family room contemporary sofa, or a 
large floral or stripe on a piece with lots 
of tufts and buttons. ' 
Accessorizing tips 

Give your rooms a pleasing 
personality-choose the right 
accessories. A home should reflect the 
personality of those who live In It 



through Its accessories. You may want 
to display your prized collections, ' 
family heirlooms, or choose the things 
that give the room a pulled together 
look, Accessories are grouped as 
functional or decorative. The 
functional group Includes mirrors, 
clocks, lights, books and pillows, while 
paintings, sculptures, plants and small 
antiques are In the decorative 
category. 

A good starting place Is to consider 
everything you presently have. It can 
be challenging to find the right spot for 
your favorite things. Keep those that 
are the right color and size for your 
bare places. Do you want to achieve a 
clean or cluttered took? A 
contemporary room usually has few 
accessories while a country room may 
have dozens. 

The design principles of balance 
and proportion are important In the 
arrangement of accessories. A single 
tiny cup and saucer would be out of 
scale on a large coffee table and a 
large ginger jar would overwhelm a 
small coffee table. There are two things 
to remember when working with a 
grouping: an odd number of anything 
is more pleasing than an even number 
and nothing should be displayed by 
Itself unless it deserves to stand alone. 

The right accessories correctly 
placed help give the room rhythm and 
reflect your personality.— by MARY 
LEBEN, Decorating Den Grayslake, 
Gurnee. For decorating questions call, 
662-6612. 



HAPPY ANNIVERSARY 



APPROVED DHALFH 



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FURNITURE 

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Solid Oak Furniture Made 
The Old World Way 



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We Feature Smith Bros, Fine Furniture 

• 61 Different Style Sofas 

•30 Different Style Upholstered Chairs 

800 To 1000 Different Fabrics 

Patricia's Qiftxuare 

3 £uo"£° m 395-4780 



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Widow Makeover 

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ltBBBe n»«^^^ Imprm* Your View from the Inside Out 

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Let me help you make your decorating 
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choose from. There's no charge for my time, 
so call today. This offer ends March 26. 




Great Ideas Just Come To You.™ 

Each (r xuhlw IndrptndcnLly owned a opcr ittd C 1994 DDSI. 

708-662-6612 

No payments for 90 days pirn 
our major purchase card. 




Mary leben 



I 




I AT HOME UIceIan(1 Newspapers Maucf. 1 1, 1 994 




; 



',) 









iiasri 



Nenspapece 



Victorian style home includes sitting area in master bedroom 




bath. 

The triple windows shown on the 
stair up provide a light an airy feeling 
to the balcony area above. There are 
three bedrooms up, Including the 
large master bed. room retreat. Upon 
arriving at the bedroom door you are 
greeted by the sitting area ratehr than 
the conventional bedroom. This sitting 
area leads Into the large bedroom 
and bath. The garden bath Is 
highlighted by a whirlpool tub with 
step and a double vanity with knee 
space and a glass enclosed shower 
stall, 

The other two bedrooms share a 
central hatl bath and a linen closet Is 



A distinguishing wrap around front 
porch will lead to a cozy entry foyer 
Including a coat cfoset and access to 
the garage. The garage can be either 
a single or double garage as your lot 
permits. Access Is also provided to a 
half bath convenient for guests and 
daytime use. 

The large activity room which spans 
the full depth of the home and 
Includes a fireplace. Is highlighted by a 
two story open area at the rear of the 



room where the open rail stair leads up 
to the bedrooms or down to the 
basement. 

The dining 1 room Is open to the 
activity room and Includes a snack bar 
counter for snacks and quick meals. 
The kitchen Is U-shaped and has the 
unique feature of the sink overlooking 
the snack bar and dining room, and 
thus looking out to the sun deck and 
rear yard as well. A laundry room is 
adjacent and Interconnects to the half 




£MOM » COMPANY 

Unique Craft » Gift Items 







Announces a 2-Day Special Event 

PAM BAUER of 

PX/ Greene's Designs 

will be showing her original custom 
line of country apparel 

umpers • Nightshirts • Aprons • Coats 
For Women & Children 



Friday & Saturday 
March 11 & 12 

Hours Sun. & Mon. 1 1 am - 5pm 

Tues. thru Sat. 9am- 6pm 

Thurs. Evenings 'til 8pm 

405~S. MILWAUKEE AVE. - LIBERTYVILL 

(across from Brown's Chicken) (708) 680-6409 JS €® 





indicated here as well. A disappearing 
stair Is located In the central hall for attic 
access and storage. 

The Victorian exterior of the home Is 

simple yet appealing. The multiple gable 

, roof lines, horizontal siding and covered 

wrap around front porch create an 

Impression of days gone by. 

Plan number 680 Includes 1,730 
square feet of heated space. All W. D. 
Farmer plans Include special 
construction details for energy efficiency 
and are drawn In accordance with FHA 
and VA requirements. 

For further Information on this plan, 
write W.D. Farmer Residence Designer, 
Inc., P.O. Box 450025, Atlanta, GA 30345. 






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pMTURDinerlaf 

■ROLLS lOTCr OF 
■TDM? 

E T .rv n .*249 

Full Em. f>c*2M 
*«7» 



WE DELIVER 
7 DAYS 

5 NIGHTS . 



Quaan Sat 
King Sat 




SAVE 
HUNDREDS 

ON FINE 
FURNITURE 



Now buy fine furniture at 
cost plus prices. We 
feature and discount 
many famous furniture 
brands Including quality 
leather styles. WE 
CUSTOM ORDER 
NAME BRANDS YOU 
CAN TRUST: 

AMERICAN DREW FLEXSTEEL 
KLAUSSNER AMERICAN OF 







STRATFORD 
LEXINGTON 

DRESHER 
CAL STYLE 
SINGER 

UNIVERSAL 

LANEEERKLINE 

BASSET 

STANLEY 

LEA 
Mittiasui idd upwittty highet' 



MARTINSVILLE 
DAYSTROM 
SCKWEIGER 
CARLTON 

R0WE 

PALUSER 

SUMTER 

WEBB 

KELLER 

PULASKI 



18 #1 MOTION 

SECTIONAL IN 

THE U.S.A. 

^.^ NOW 



Mm MM 



'1650 



100% •olid Portn 

Chorry 

atodroom *«t by Sumtor 

Triple Dresser, Mirror, Queen Bed, 
Nights* and, Chest On Chest. 

S UH nWF*ARtW"<H7 0KIY *2888 



RECLINING 

LEATHER 

SOFA AND 

LOVE SEAT 

Compare at "2395 

M699 




LEATHER RECLINER 



Compare el »24e« IZCdonAvaltbla NOW 1699 



THE ORIGINAL EST IN 1961 

MARJEN 

'500 Minimum Snle 

1/3 down payment 

subject to crociit approval 



LIBEHTWILLE I PALATINE 

5MN.tfhYauin«Avt. 

(Downtown Llbtrtyville) 

[708] 549-74CK 






ifUrxIRok 



TOP QUALITY 

LEATHER SOFA 

AND 

LOVE SEAT 

Compare at *24W 

m ow M 49 9 

MLE? 

8U1N.HhiaiAM 

(3 bloeki N, ol Oakton) 

1708)966-10881 

Same *oc*t!on 27 ytwt. 



SIURt HOURS M >N fRi 10 3IMI iv iA' bUN II Mil 
N il AH ILIA I i (. VVllH [It V. >N 



■'—=-r~ 



\kf.!ANcJ NewspApE RS CU 



IED 




CLASSIFIED 
GUIDE 




FtaancUl 




rlOI*CC5 f ..,., r „HJii..| r » 1 vj..M>ii.|.|i*iii »nuil4Mti>«MM4fliltM)lM 1 10 

tost & Found ,.. .»„„ W.NNH.HI 11 5 

Hwi<HMtMt«l»IH1Hltt>tHtHtHIIHM1UIMHttHHIHIIHI4IHHIHtHllMIHIMMmi»H I fcl/ 

luoOIUlSi n..t....< mi <....«... XZy 

AUQIUlUMtlltlMIIIIIIMniMtMtilHtllHtlHUItlitMPfMiiOlM • not !jl/ 

Business Personals ...i„„^..;^ 135 

n»l. >IMI»llV 

l^'^lrflW-Tto.'..'..V™'^„'. ,'..' .'. :.„V..,-.219, 

Hdp Wanted FuU-Ttme ............. ., 220 

Enjoyment Agendo ,.,„„„„,., ....,.„ „ .,221 

Business Opportunities. .....225 

catuiuOQS WttHto .,,.,,,,.,,., 1 , ,,,,,228 

Child Care «... 240 

School/Instruction ..„.„ ...„ ,250 

AIlUv|ilt3l«< *•*•** I IN Mill |B«|| 11. 114*111 1. - M.i,,, JV I 

Appliances i. „.. 304 

Barter/Trade i „ 308 

Bimn/CntfLs.... 310 

Building Materials.. ...... 3U 

Busfncss/OfflceEqurptneol.,,, 318 

Efedroolcs/Cornputers.. „..„«.„„, .„ 320 

■ *U1U UUMClNIMHHIHtlM(N(HMIIIIMIIWIIIMM«t)l4N4<ii itll'liliiltii imt MM) J«l 

Rrewood. ...... „..„ „;. ....328 

Garage/ftimmitp Sales , « 330 

CoodTWnploEal. „..;. „...„..;..- 334 

Horses 4 Tack i. „ .338 

Household Coods/Puraltu re. ....340 

Jewelry .„ « I 344 

Lawn/Garden,,,.. .„ „ „ ,348 

tfll JV VU 4AWJJ\fcj «m.«i«inmmtii«ninMHiin->i»iii inmi>iiii<intir<niii n..».i.i. JJ*J 

Medical Equip/Supplies ......;,.. .354 

Mus kail Instruments ««.»..... „ .,..,.......; ...,,...358 

Pets &SuppUes „ „ „.... 360 

Restaurant Equipment „.., 354 

Toots a Machinery. „ 368 

Wanted To Buy. „ ,.„ 370 



Homes For Sale ........'™;:..;....,........„...„.....500 

Homes For Rent....... „..„ 504 

Homes Wanted ,,...508 

Homes Builders ........... 510 

Coodo/Tom Homes . .'.» 514 

Mobile Homes .„ .« 518 

Apartments For Rent......... ...........520 

Apsrtmcnts Wzjiicd.iu- „ u , ,„, » ,,,,, ,,»,..-»!..* 524 

amfhjddks 10 iiiiircjM!. ,,..1 ■ i.<....hmfJ*o 

.WWUB IVl HQll«<HIH»MI«IHIIHlMmHllltlHtlll*IHH)IMIHII»IHIHIttHMHIM*Mj'Jy. 

p|j|f|*nD€^* " " >r — ' \ ' K\\ 1 

* OfAKUlIlu it-»ltifr**.|****l*f +ti it ***** t** ************ liiiiiiiiMliiiiiiiiiiinii iiiainii J J J 

Bustness Property For Sale........... ....„.;..„'. ..,."......534 

Business Property For Rent.. ; ...538 

Inrestmenl Property „,... 540 

Mortgage Services.,... „ ;„ 544 

Farms -. „ 548 

Vacant Lots/Acreage „ .„ „...5o0 

Resorts/Vacation Rentals. ......;... .. 564 

Out of Area Property » .'. ...568 

Cemetery lots .„„...„ 570 

Real Estate Wanted... 574 

HCpH BmYbWUEBI «H15C» ntMltlll)m|1ll<liM*HmilHIHI»IHMH*H|MHHtttl*HllMNIM/rQ 

mm" 

JIONA 

Recreational Vehiaes ,,..„ ,.,..,..,.....,„...,., .....704 

jOownjooticr \i t 3 ........ «.«.***...«.■.,....■.■. ....... .,.,,...* .,....«*».....«. whm /uo 

Boals/Motors/Bc.^.^ 710 

Camping ..„ U,'i — 714 

Tiwd/VacaUon ^ - 718 

Spotte Equipment ."„ „ .„ 720 

Airplanes — .'. „..,„ 724 




Cars For Sale 

Rental/Leases 

Classic/Antique Cars 

Service & Parts 

Car Loans/Insurance 
Vans i 



««**•»•***#•*?* ra 1*1*4* *************** 

1 1 *•■■■> \ ******************* ****** 



804 
80S 

810 

814 
818 
824 




Four Wheel Drive/Jeeps .„ „ 828 

Trucks/Trailers.. „....„ .834 

Heiry Equipment , ........838 

MiHOrCjviG3 1 1 t. 1 t .11 0*1 t! 

Wanted To Buy.,.. .'. 848 

imp 1 ' 1 iMpp; 

Appliances Repair — 903 

Blacktop.. „■. S06 

BuUders. ...". - 909 

Carpentry ; „ S12 

Carpet Cleaning.. .....;.... S15 

Coocrete/Cement.,.. SIS 

Dry Wall...- - S21 

Edjicallorj/lnslniction S24 

Electrical „ .S27 

Firewood..... ; - S30 

Handyman S33 

Healint/AlrCorrtttonlng «... S36 

Housekeeprng S39 

Landscaping .-. S42 

Lauadry/C)eaning..,.., ..S45 

Legal Services , • *18 

Medical Services »....-.... - S51 

fltOTTDgfO^OntgV MXtM'IMK tHH • HWHHIHH *»*IM 

F*atlnVDecorallng S57 

riraLegaviyping Services «..._,. .tou 

rlumbtog .....,..„. S63 

Pools S66 

Pressure Washing » S69 

Professional Services.,,., S72 

Bado/TV Repair.. ; S7S 

Remodeling. • S78 

Resumes .--SB1 

Roofing/Skiing. •■" •'• "'S** 

Storage ».... .».-SB7 

Tax service n , , • ?■••» »..syu 

Trees/Plantt..... — S93 

Wedding. S96 

Miscellaneous Services,,., S99 



disTRibuTioN 




Crystajl 
Lake^t 

Mcllcnry 
, County 



■;\ 



- 




Lakeland 

Newspapers 




110 


Notices 



115 



lost 4 Found 



125 


Personals 




219 



Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



219 



Hdp Van ted 

Faft-TttiK 



GERMAN STUDENT, INTER- 
ESTED in Sports, and Music. 
Other Scandinavian, Euro- 
pean, South Amerlvcan Ja- 
panese high school students 
arming August. Become a 
Host Famlly/AISE. Call Bar- 
bara <21 7)243-8453 or 
fl/BOOjSIBUNQ. 

NICE REWARD) PURSE, 
GRAY WITH BLACK 
STRIPES. VICINITY OF AN- 
TIOCH'S PIGGLY WIGGLY. 
Saturday 375/94. Navy 
checkbook, BURGANDY ad- 
dress book, Credit Cards. If 
anyone finds, PLEASE call, 
I would be so grealful. Very 
sentimental and peraonal, 
can't be replaced! (70S) 
356-8329. 



LOST DOG- MEDIUM size 
Golden Ret reiver mix, an- 
swers to Sarnanlha, brown 
collar with rabies tags. If 
found Call (708) 973-2732 
REWARDI 

REWAHDI LOST * CAT- 
12/14/93. Small black' fe- 
male dewclawed front, not 
rear,, short face hair, long 
slky. body and tall hair. Gur- 
nee (708) 662-5876, 
(708)244-9666. 



120 


Free 



115 



Lost & Found 



SPRING CLEANING?? 

FREE AND GIVEAWAY 
rTEMS CAN RUN HERE AT 
NO CHARGE! (We discour- 
age any pet ads) CALL TO- 
DAY. (708) 223-8161 . 



ARE YOU THAT Good Sa- 

marttian who FOUND 
someonea PET or special 
lost Article? Cajl Lakeland 
Classified, and get results, 
FOUND ads are RUN FREE 
ol Charge. Call (708)223- 
8161. 



FOUND IN GRAYSLAKE 

MurtJclpto Parking Lot- Keys lo 
a gray Chevy Celebrity Wag- 
on. Found on 2-10-94. Call 
(708)223-8161. 



LOST DOG- DEC.12TH, Neu- 
tered male Carin Terrier, 
3/yrs. Wheat' color with 
brown ' ears and throat. 
LARGE REWARDI (708) 
367-5541, anytime. 



125 


Personals ' 



A BABY IS ALL WE HAVE 
EVER WANTEDI High school 
sweethearts- married ■ 12 
years and si Ml best friends, 
want to nurture, guide, and 
love wf h all our hearts. We'll 
help you al we can. Call Col- 
leen and John (312)774-1586 
coJect. 

ADOPTION- A FAMILY 
DREAM. One of the reasons 
there is a Stile extra sunshine, 
laughter and happiness In the 
world b because of children. 
Because we are childless, 
there haven! been too many 
sunny days. We know you can 
brighten our world with a chHd 
that will be guided wlh love 
and tenderness, and guar- 
anteed security 



ADOPTION: LOVING PAR- 
ENTS, A l-l/2yr.old big 
brother, 2/friendly puppy 
dogs, and a big back yard In 
the suburbs await your new 
bom. We have the love in our 
hearts and the stability to pro- 
vide for your chid. Call Chris 
or Debbie anytime, (708) 
453-7960 COLLECT. Legally 
allowable expenses paid. 

ADOPTION- THE FUTURE 
CAN BE Bright wlh full-lime 
Mom, Sucessful Dad, 3- 
trlendry dogs and peaceful 
suburban neighborhood, full 
of kids, parks, and excellent 
schools. Please let us give 
your baby a lifetime of love 
and opportunity. We're 
eager to help. Call Debbie 
and Steve collect (708)295- 
9515. 

I I BEAUTIFUL FOREVER! 1 
Permanent Eye and Lip Lin- 
ing; Brow Color. Eledroty- 
sla By SHERRY. IByra. Ex- 
perience. 3rd NEW Like 
Villa Office. (709) 

244-1640. 

THIGH REDUCING CREAM 
GUARANTEED FOR CeltuBte 
and Stubborn Fat, as seen 
on TV. (708)597-^835; 



ASSEMBLERS: 

ExciIIent Income 10 asvemdIe 
products AT HOME. 

INFO 

1 504 646 1700 
DEPT. IL'646 



HOME TYPISTS 

PC users needed. 

$35,000 potential. 

Details. 

Call (1) 805-962-8000 
ExL 0-4458 




HI 



CHILDRENS I 
I PARTY CENTERS 



Salary negotiable » 
with experience. 
h Apply in Person 
p or Call 

§ Let's Pretend 
469 N. Lake 
Mundelein, IL 
S (708) 566-6900 » 
11 am '6 pm 



TH 



Free Martial Arts 
NEMniroinr 

In. exchange for 
Part time work 

Responsible, organized 
and experienced In 

•COMrUTERTVPING 
•MEMDOtSIID? SALES 

•Commissions paid 

Inetiuclion In Bruce Lee'e 
street- effective methods, 
and Filipino Stick & Knife. 

Dahms . 

Academy 

of Martial Arts 

-, (70S) 740-4600 -H 




219 



Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



Lakeland Classifieds 
Get the Job -Done! 
Call (708)223-81 61 



NOTICE TO ADVERTISERS 

Please check your ad on the FIRST Insertion date. In the 
event of an error or omission, we will be responsible for 
ONLY the FIRST incorrect Insertion. The newspaper will be 
responsible for only the portion of the ad that is in error. 
Please notify the Classified Department In the event of an 
error within 1 week of run date. CANCELLATIONS must be 
made prior to 5 p.m. on the Tuesday before publication. 

Lakeland Newspapers reserves the right to properly clas- 
sify all advertising, edit or delete any objectionable wording, 
or reject any advertisement for credit or policy reasons. 

Alt Help Wanted advertising Is published under unified 
headings. Lakeland Newspapers does not knowingly accept 
help wanted advertising that in any way violates the Human 
Rights Act. 

Payment in Advance is Required for These Ads: 

•Advertisers out of Lakeland circulation area 

•Business Opportunities 'Mobile Homes 'Situations Wanted 

•Debt Disclaimers 'Garage and Moving Sales 

'Found and Giveaway Ads are FREE. 

No pets will b« considered for giveaway. 

WE ACCEPT: SB •» 



$500. WEEKLY. Pirt-Tlme 
Showing Our Products. 
Eiiy Work. Serious 
SCMH. We Train. (708) 

TUPPERWARE* BUY OR 
SELL- Call Cindy (70S)26S- 
0308 or Barb, (70S) 
640-1680. 



PART TINE 
MAILROOM 

Thursdays in our 

Grayslake office. 
Perfect for retirees, 
married couples or 

someone wanting 
to pick up a 

little extra money. 
Call Bob Schroeder 
(708) £83-8161 

Lakeland 

Newspapers 



BBBBBBBBBBBBBBBB 

S PHOTO 
B STRINGERS 

g Lakeland Newspapers 9 
Dhas openings on itsg 
■{expanding editorial 
I staff for . photo 
D stringers. Will handle a 
Evariety of assignments. 
■jMust have a reliable 
Dear, camera equipment - 
jjand be able to workS 

Bunder deadline situa- 
tions. For interview 
^appointment contact 
n Rhonda Vinzant 
f! Editor-in-Chief 
d ^ 

g(708)223-8161 

EBeSHBHHBBHHBHH 



PREVENTATIVE HEALTH 
CARE INDUSTRY 

Seeking sell molNaiod person 
with exporionco in advertising, 
marketing, training or has owned 
or oporatod a busnoss. Wll train. 
CALL MR. ZIEMBA 
(708) 638-3000 



HELP WANTED 
PART TIME 

Car Porter 

Call Troy 
(708) 680-7001 

Enterprise 
Rent-A-Car 




An you a plant lover! 

Major Service company 
looking for customer 
jervico oriented people 
to care for tropical 
plant! in officei and 
m«lk, etc. Miut have 
own car. Good mUry, 
benefit*, bonuaea and 
car exponaea. Full 
training. 

Call 

IttMOKIL 

Tropical Plivt 

Service 
(708) 6344109 



Earn Up To 
$15 An Hour 

CUSTOMER 
SERVICE 

Complete 

training, paid 

holidays, flexible 

Part-time hours. 

If you are 

interested, 

Call 
Lynn Kopfer 

(708)32*8161 

Lakeland 

Newspapers 
Grayslake, IL 



Sd^V, 









.•;■.-• '••*'■■• 



ftuxata^ t m caa nwwwi ui mui i i ii m afwottuiift^ 



«MBtKMU*M(UBRMM«i 




CLASSIFIED Ukl/\N<! Newspapers MarcIi I1 r 1994 



*«. *-« 




219 



Help Wanted 

Part-Time 



219 



Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



BANQUET SERVERS 

Part Time 

Somo oxporlonco, well groomod. 
Apply boiwoon 1 A 5 p.m., ask 
lor Donnb 

COUNTRY SQUIRE 

Rics. 120 & 45 • Grayslako, IL 
708-223-3022 



CASHIER/ 
RECEPTIONIST 

$5.5<Vhr. 

Must be able to work 
evenings and weekends. 

Apply in Person 

MOOt'S OlTDOOR fOWJ), INC 
145 S. Soyton 
Fox Lake, IL 



DENTAL 
ASSISTANT 

Experienced 

3-5 days per week from 
2 pm or 5 pm to appro* . 
8 pm. Occasional Sat. 
mornings. 

(708) 2443322 



3Er 



at 



FAIRFIELD INN 

NIGHT AUDIT 

Part time position. 
Someone who enjoys 
bookkeeping ' and is 
responsible. Hours arc 
11pm -7am. 
Apply In person at the 

Gurnee Comfort Inn 
or Fairfield Inn ■ 

6080 Gurnee Mill! Blvd. 

Curnee, IL 60031 

Employer Paid Ad 






HOSTESS 
TO WORK 

Tacs, Frl, Sun Evenings 
Spm- Close 

WAITSTAFF 

Monday-Friday Lunch 

Experience required 

1030am - 2$Opm 

The Silo 

625 Rockland Rd. 

Lake Bluff, IL 
(708) 234-6660 



A 



DELIVERY 
WORK 

Lakeland Newspapers 
has openings in our circu- 
lation department on 
Thursdays and Fridays. 
You must be extremely 
dependable. Ideal for a 
retired person. Contact 

Bob Schroeder at 
(708) 223-8161 

Lakeland 

Newspapers 

Grayslake, IL 



Part-time 
KexIbJe Hours 

Do you like to talk on 
the phone? Do you 
enjoy being part of a 
team and working in a 
fast-paced environ- 
ment? Do you like a 
challenge? Ideally, an 
independent, self- 

starter will be the right 
person for this accounts 
receivable collectors 

[sosition. Telephone col- 
ection experience nec- 
essary. Basic bookkeep- 
ing helpful. Call Jo 
Davis for Interview 
appointment with 

Lakeland 

Newspapers 

(708) 223-8161 



YOU ALWAYS HIT 
THE MARK WITH 

THE CLASSIFIEDS 



PART-TIME RURAL CARRIERS 



Rural Carrier Associates are needed to provide service on established regular 
rural routes in the absence o( regular rural carriers or to provide service on aux- 
iliary routes. This Is a non-career position with no guaranteed work hours. Rural 
Carrier Associates are selected from a register of eltgblet established as the 
result ot an open competitive rural carrier examination. 



1 1 Qualify on written examination 

2) Valid state drivers license 

3) Two years driving experience 



npel 

POSITION REQUIREMENTS 



4) GOOD DRIVING RECORD A MUST 

5) Use ol personal vehicle 

6) Meet persona! & medical 
suitability requirement! 

After 1 year as t Rural Carrier Associate, an employee may apply tor lull-time 
rural carrier positions, as vacancies occur. 

•EXCELLENT HOURLY WAGE - S9.29 AN HOUR 
^nseosx. 'GAS ALLOWANCE 

S'^^fc' 5 HowtoAppy: Obtain an applicAlksn Form 2479A/B 

; jJSL. 5 from Round Lake Post OHice, 401 Nipperslnk, 

= ggffi S Round Lake, IL 60073. Applicants will be conladtd 

*••••«••* concerning examination scheduling. 



Drivers 



T&fcs^^ 




Sb 

##**- 



ES, 

OMEMAKERS 

& STUDENTS 



PART TIME • AIM'S & AFTERNOONS 
$7.75 Per Hour Plus Benefits 

Become an important part of the school tradition for 
children in Lake Bluff and Lake Forest ! The nation's 
leader in transportation services has immediate part- 
Li me openings for individuals who are at least 2 1 years 
old with a good driving record. Convenient flexible 
morning and afternoon scheduling available. Con- 
sider what we offer: 

•PAID TRAINING > PAID HOLIDAYS 

• MONTHLY BONUS •CREDIT UNION 

•STOCK PURCHASE PLAN •TUITION AID 

• COMPANY PAID LIFE INSURANCE 

• LOW COST MEDICAL INSURANCE 

Call Today For Your Personal Interview! 

708-680-9305 

Ryder Student Transportation Services 

EOBM/F/D/V 




"Jaasw;' 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



II VAC SERVICE 
TECHNICIAN 

Full Time Benefits. Minimum 
3 yean experience. 

Call (708) 356-2225 



He 



Full Time and 
Part Time 

Housekeeper 

Evenings & 

Weekends 

Contact 

Gail Becker 

Mount 
St. Joseph 

(708) 438-5050 



RR 

it now hiring 
•MANAGERS 
•MANAGER 
TRAINEES . 

for several Northern Lake 
County locations. Must be 
able to work llexfele sched- 
ule. Positions Include many 
benefits, Including opportu- 
nity tor advancement. 

Call John Doyle . 

815-356-9779 ext 116 

or smnd naunm to: 

335 Commerce Drive 

Crystal Lake, I L 60014 



220 



Hdp Wanted 
Full-Tlme 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



BARR-NUNN TRANSPORTA- 
TION- HAS Immedtalo open- 
ings for experienced OTR 
drivers. For (op pay and ben- 
efits with a family at- 
mosphere call 1/800369- 
2525. Barr-Nunn Dos 
Moines. Iowa. 

COVENANT TRANSPORT. 
$500 algn-on Bonus (after 
90-diys) Last year our top 
team earned over $95,000 ' 
Starting at .27c to .29* per 
mile wllh plus bonuses paid 
to ,36c per mile 'Monthly 
mileage Bonus *6/month 
Mileage Bonus 'Yearly 
monthly Mileage Bonus 
*Pakf Insurance 'Motel/ Lay- 
over Pay 'Loading/ Unload- 
ing pay 'Vacation, dead- 
head pay. Rtqulrnmnnta: 
'age 23 *1yr. verifiable over- 
the-road 'Class A' COL with 
Hazardous Materials. 1/800- 
441-4394. 

DRIVERS! FREE 2wk CDL 

TRAINING The Best No Ex- 
perience Needed OTR Trac- 
tor-Traiter In America* Guar- 
anteed Minimum $25,000 
First year 'Predictable Dedi- 
cated Route 'Salary Starts 
during training. All Point* 
1/10O-777-75S7 Sun. 10am- 
3pm, Mon-Tues. 61m-6pm, 
Wed.Fri. 7am-4pm. 

TRUCK DRIVERS- DRIVE 
TO OWNr $0 down JSC/mHe 
All mRes. Tractor ownership 
30/42 monthsl *.22* /mile 
driver positions *2 yrs. mln, 
experience. New Apple 
Lines, Inc. 1/800-843-8308 
or 1/800-843-3384 Madison, 
SD. 



DRIVERS- COMECOME 

FOR THE MONEY, STAY 
FOR THE STABILITY. 
J.B.HUNTone of America's 
Largest and most successful 
transportation companies,' 
pays Its drivers some ot Ihe 
besl salaries In the business. 
Inexperienced drtvors call 
1/800-845-2187, Experi- 
enced drivers 1/800-368- 
8538. J.B.HUNT The Best 
Run for the ' Money, 
EOE.Subfect to Drug Screen. 

DRIVERS- MIDWEST 

SHORTHAUL AND OTR OP- 
PORTUNITIES! No 
Slip Seating, Home Weekly 
In shorthaul, Excellent 
pay/benefits. Burlington 
Motor Carriers. 1/800-JOIN- 
BMC. EOE. 

DRIVERS: OTR- STI of Qut> 
cy, IL. Hiring LONG or 
SHORT haul drivers. Dry, re- 
frigerated or flatbed- Your 
Choice. Percentage Pay, full 
famty health and more. Call 

1/80O-S66-9771. 



DRIVERS: TOP OPPORTU- 
NITIES FOR owner operators 
In 3-fleets: Relocation Servic- 
es, Blankotwrap and High 
Value Products. Outstanding 
tractor purchase program 
available Tuition-tree train- 
ing for Inexperienced drivers. 
NorthAmerlcan Van Lines 
600/348-2147, Dopl. DK.9). 

IMMEDIATE HIRE VICTORY 
Express (Dayton area), hir- 
ing Inexperienced applicants 
for OTR drivers. Our tuftlon- 
free . training will have you 
earning In one month. 1/800- 
543-5033 for Information. 



MECHANIC - AG 

Exp. JD Technician. Scenic 
Livingston, Montana. Send 
resume to: Strong & 
Bradley, 1 122 E. Park St, 
Livingston, MT 59047 or 

Fax:406-222-0410 



CONSTRUCTION 

WORKERS AND 

SUBCONTRACTORS 

needed for all types of homo 
Improvements. Roofers, sMtrs, win- 
dow, door, garage opener, fence 
Installert, etc. Musi be wilng to trav- 
el. Call Horkera Home Improvement 

1-800-776-1290 



Social Services 

COUNSELOR/TRAINER 

Variety or fell indport Iliac poiilloiu 
ue available. IIS Diploma/equivalent 
in4 driven license required. CNA'j 
axcurcged to apply. DD experience 
preferred. 

Full lime receive 3 weeks vacation 
nm year. Pleat* coma In to complete 
an application er sand name to; 

Lake County Society 

For Human Development 

344! Sheridan Rd. 

lion, XL 60099 

708-872-1700 
equal opportunity employer 



TELEMARKETING 

ttCASII PAID DAILYtf 

Start Today! 

No experience 

necessary • 

Earn '200-*4(M) 

per week. 

MUNDELEIN 

(708) 949-9240 



INSURANCE 

Gurnee Independent 
Insurance Agency seeks 
licensed Personal Lines 
GSR. 

Rating, underwriting, 
marketing, excellent 
communication skills 
and computer literacy is 
essential. A friendly 
personality is a plus. 

Send resumes to: 

INSURANCENTER 

4673 Grand Ave. 
Gurnee, IL 60031 



CASHIERS 



Full and part-time, available, some week- 
ends. Experience not necessary, will tralnl 

Stop by your local J&L station! 
Or one of our other locations today I 



Lake Bluff- Gurnee- Island Lake' 
Rt.43. Rt 132 Rt. 176 




1*1 



advertising sales 

Lakeland Newspapers, Lake County's largest weekly 
newspaper group, Es seeking an Advertising Account 
Executive. The candidate will be responsible for field 
sales calls, developing a key area in Lake County 
and must possess excellent skills in interpersonal 
cooMnunicatJoo, creativity and personal responsibility. 
The candidate must also be self motivated and able 
to work with minimal amount of supervision, enjoy 
variety and be able to handte multiple tasks. An auto- 
mobile Is necessary (gas compensation will be 
made.) If you are professional, energetic and pos- 
sess al of the above characteristics we are interest- 
ed in talking to you. A candidate should have previ- 
ous sates experience. Please send resume or call: ~ 

Bill Bauer 

Lakeland Newspapers 

30 S. Whitney St. 

Grayslake, IL 60030 

(708) 223-8161 



MACHINE OPERATORS 

1ST & 2ND SHIFT 

Must have familiarity with production machinery. Familiarity with automated machines desirable. 
Willing to consider short shift on 2nd shift. 

INSPECTORS 

2ND AND 3RD SHIFT 

Responsibilities include visually Inspecting microelectronic components under a microscope. 
Experience Is not necessary for this inspection position. 

CLERK-TYPIST 
9:00 am - 5:30 pm 

Duties Include sending and distributing faxes, mall and reports. Filing and switchboard relief. Must 
be able to type 35 wpm. 

Please apply In person between 8 AM and 5 PM. Benefits Include medical & dental Insurance, tuition 

reimbursement plan, profit-sharing and 401 K. 

Wc arc located at the corner of Silver Lake Rd, and Three Oaks Rd. 




1102 SILVER LAKE ROAD « GARY 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Timc 



220 



Help Wanted 

Full-Timc ■ 



OTR DRIVER OR 0/0 dally 
South Chicago to Columbus, 
Ohio, round. Weekly pay, 
benefits, company trailers. 
Established, reliable 27yr.otd 
Roofer comer. Grand Inland 
Exprw, 1/B00-444-7143. . 

SEP' VICE-SALES REP. 

AUTO AflermarkGt. Exclusive 
territory. You Must Like 
Working wllh Your Hands. 
$40,000 Base +Bonuses 
+Benolits. Call Tuesday or 
Thursday ONLY! (817)633- 
7973. 



MARINE TECH 

Expar'd only, Eitab. marina 200+ 
slips hat lull lima yaar round own- 
ing (or qualified lachnfelan. Good 
bsna, wages baiad on axp. Sand 
resume: Port Arrowhead Marina, 
3070 Sagn«l| Blvd., Laka Ozark, 
MO 65049 or callJack 

314-365-5382 



iilliiillllllilillllllllllilllllliiillnll^ 
RESIDENTIAL 1 

CLEANMG SERVICE | 

SLooMng lor reliable person, 
Must have car. Excellent start' 
ling salary. Cal for appointment. 

(708)223-4292 

iffl im iii ni i iii n Hi i iniiiiiiMi»l)i 



f 



IEACHERS/ASST. TEACHERS 
- PLEASE READ! 

Exceptional top pay caroor and 
personal growth opportunities 
now available at NW Suburbs' 
leading; child cam learning cen- 
to n. We will train. Full time/part 
time, SG-S10 per hour. 

Call Our Personnel Office 
1-800-720-0250 



RETAIL SALES 

Base pay ♦ commission 

Pool Chemical Sales 
*5.$Q/br. 4- monthly bonus 

Musi be able to work 
, evenings and weekends. . 

Apply in Person 

Meier's Outdoor 
World, Inc. 

14$ S. Saytcm 
Fox Lake, IL 



INSIDE SALES 

Mundeleln 

Leading publisher/ 
printer seeks experi- 
enced inside sales per- 
son to sell direct 
response advertising 
to business and con- 
sumer advertisers. Full 
time/Part time base 
plus commission. 

Call Gordon 
(7081 566-9450 


MG A 


INC. 


EOE 








ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT 

High profile marketing corp. seeks upbeat high energy exec 
asst. Word Perfect on Mac & good communication skills. 



•708-Z44-0016 





perior JZersonnel 



] 



SALES/SERVICE 

| A Milwaukee area company is seeking a self-moti-j 
vaied Individual to service accounts In the 
Chicago/Northern Illinois area. The candidate will 
be responsible for servicing existing accounts as 
well as building new business. Benefits and compa - 

■ ny, vehicle provided. Salary and bonus depends on 

I performance. Physical labor involved. Interested 

[candidates send resume to: 

BoxJJ 

c/o Lakeland Newspapers 

P.O. Box 268 

Grayslake, IL 60030 




« VERNON HILLS 8- 

OPENING 




Now Hiring Team Players 

for all positions... We Offer ... 

•50% Dining Discount 

►Immediate Health Care Enrollment 

•Opportunity for Advancement 

•Flexible Scheduling 

APPLY IN PERSON 

Monday-Friday 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. 

Saturday Noon to 4 p.m. . 

Vernon Hills 

447 North Milwaukee Avenue 

(Just South of Townline Road) 





fttach 1.1, Iff 4 UvkclANd Newspapers CLASSIFIED 





220 



Help Wanted 
FuM-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time' 



CHILD CARE 
EXPERIENCE? 

North Shore Nannies has 
immediate positions avail* 
able FT & FT. Live In and 
come/go. Contact Kalhy. 

(708) 448-2550 



MECHAHIC-AG 

Case IH Farm Tractor 
Mechanic to work In Colorado 
Mountain Valley. SchaD Iron 
Works, 1021 N. US 285, 
Monte Vista, CO 81144. 

719-852-5974 



WAREHOUSE 

Lake Bluff compnay needs 
picking, packing, stocking 
and shipping positions avail- 
able. Get In on the ground 
floor of a young, fast -grow 
Ing company. Good written 
and verbal communication 
skills required. For Inteivlew, 

Call Ann 
(708)615-2110 



Gurnee 

Comfort 

Inn 

1 HEAD j 
HOUSEKEEPING 

Looking for motivated, hard 
working individual. Part 
time to Full time hours. 
Prior housekeeping super- 
visory experience a plus. . 

EOE 
Apply in Person At The 

Gurnee 
Comfort Inn 

6080 Gurnee Mills Blvd. 
Gurnee, IL 60031 
Employer Paid Ad 
••••••••• 



EXECUTIVE'S 
'ASSISTANT 

Immediate opening for 
assistant to assist top 
real estate professional 
couple. You should be an 
organizer, a positive per- 
son, a good communica 
tor-both written and ver- 
bal-experienced with 
computer/word process- 
ing, have a good sense of 
humor, be a fast learner 
with a quick mind and be 
willing to work hard and 
smart You'll work in a 
fast-paced real estate 
office in Grayslake 
Please indicate salary 
desired. The first step Is 
to send your resume to: 

| Bruce & Claire Campbell 
Ic/o Re/Max Center 

100 Atkinson 
Grayslake, IL 60030 




GRADUATES 
WANTED. 

Choose from 
over 150 technical 
specialties. Earn 
great pay with 30 
days of vacation 
with pay per year. 
Discover how 
today's Air Force 
can pay you up to 
75% of tuition for 
college credit 
courses. Call 

AIR FORCE 
OPPORTUNITIES 

TOLLFREE 
1-80042MJSAF 




220 



Help Wanted 
Fall-Time 



MARINE MECHANIC 

Must bs Morcrulier certVlod & 
have substantial expor. w/marlno 
dlesois. Stable working conditions 
a corrpolltJvB compensation pkg, 
Send rotumo of qualification* to: 
IRISH BOAT SHOP, 13000 
Stover FkU Charlevoix, Ml 49720, 
No Phono Cans, Ploasel 



HBBBBBBBBBBHHBB 



Local delivery. Small car 

& Insurance necessary. 

Apply at 

402 N. Seymour 

Mundefein 

gQgggggggygggg 



Rotlaurant 

Cooks, Servers, HoauHcalmat, 
Butwr*. Lrg. co In quaint Long 
Grove vllags (she of historic spe- 
cialty shopsjoponlng now restaurant 
In lato March. Hvy voVhlgh traffic 
area. Interviewing staff who are 
bright, aware ft customer oriented 
Exp. helpful Must work days, Comp 
starting pay&ens ft employee disc. 

Call {70&) 459-3100 «L 135. 



Village ol 
Round Lake Beach 

b accepting applications for 

LIFEGUARDS 

for the summer season. 

RED CROSS 

CERTIFICATES In CPR 

and Advanced Lite Saving 

& Water Safety a musl I 

Apply at 911 Lotus Dr. 

Public Works Dept 



if 



'TEACHER 
♦VAN DRIVER 

needed for Round 
Lake area day care 
center. Full and part 
time hours. For more 
information, call Tina at 

708-546-3383 



Data Entry 
General Office 

$8.50 per hour 

Growing Vernon Hills 
company seeks loam play- 
er with pitch in attitude 
for largo, friendly depart- 
ment. Duties include 
alpha & numeric data 
entry. 40+ wpm accurate 
typing, faxing, photocopy- 
ing and light phones. Any 
word processing experi- 
encc helpful. Contact Ms. 
Campbell at 

708-634-6622 



AD AGENCY 



POSITION 



Creative North Shore 

design group is now 

accepting resumes for 

a sales sharpshooter. 



SDL I %ou 

DESIGN,! CR flft 

9 7Q8.yi6.wi 






1 RETAIL/ 
WHOLESALE 

lender seeking experi- 
enced loan officers with 
a following to. .service 
one of our 4 offices. We 
offer Conventional, 
G o v ernmenl, 
Commercial & equity 
products. We will match 
or better your present 
commission structure. 
Full Benefits available. 
We wilt assist you In 
making the transition. 
Please call for an 
appointment. 

(708) 356-0001 

Ask for Don , 

We are on Illinois, Indiana 
m and Wisconsin Mortgages . 



1 



I 



RECEPTIONIST 

Long term cane facility 
seeking Receptionist 
for 7am-3:30pm and 
weekend shifts. Apply 
in person to: 

NORTH SHORE 
TERRACE 

2222 W. 14th St. 
Waukegan, IL 60085 

equal opportunity employer 



8 

L 



CUSTOMER SERVICE 

$$$$$$. Bilingual Spanish a +. 2-3 yr. experience. 

Fast-paced environment Offers great benefits 

708*244-OOl6 



* flair Stylist 1 * 

Full Time for salon 
in Long Grove. 

Tuesday thru Saturday 
Hours and Salary Negotiable 

Manicurist 

Full Time, must do acrylics 
and gel To rent space 
OR work for salon In 
. Long Grove. 

Call Tues-Sat 
(708) 634-1035 

L Ask for Debbie _ 

8 

eel 




perior JLersonnel 



STAR PERFORMERS NQW BEING 

HIRED AT WACCAMAW FOR THE 

POSITIONS OF FLORAL DESIGNERS, 

AND FOOD SERVICE ASSOCIATES 

• ■**•••••••••• 

Applicant must provide superb customer service by acknowledging the 
customer and offering assistance in a friendly, sincere and helpful man- 
ner. Applicant must nave a desire to be involved in a fast-paced home 
decor retail environment. Ability to stand 95% of the day, lift, bend, 
reach, move merchandise and fixtures (1 0-60 lbs.) 
Applicant needs to be flexible, Monday • Sunday and evening hours. 
Benefit Potential. Enjoy 20% discount on your purchases 
Apply 

WACCAMAW 

Gumcc Mills - (708) 855-0480 x 263 

EOE 




McDonald's 

NEW STORE OPENING IN GURNEE 

NOW HIRING 
ALL POSITIONS - ALL SHIFTS 

Interviews at McDonald's 
Grand & Dilleys Road 

Friday, March 11th 1:00 pm - 4:00 pm 
and Saturday, March 12th 6:00 am - 1 1 :00 am 

For more information ask for Shawn 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
rail-Time 



Retail/Sales 
Long Grove Confectionery 
(Chocolate Co.) has several 
FT/FT positions open In their 
NW Sub. locations. Rex hrs, 
days/evesAvkends. Training & 
employee discount. Call Pat 

(708) 459-3100 «Ct 335 



TEACHERS 

Full and Part Time 

Must have 60 hrs. of col- 
lege credit with 6 in early 
childhood. Good benefits, 
including free chlldcare, 

(708) 395-6494 
-Apply in person please- 

PEPPERMINT STICK 

848 Main St.. 

Antloch, IL 

I HI11III111III11I1IIIII1IIIIIIII11IIIII1I 

PRODUCTION 
WORKERS 

Due to tremendous 
growth, Deoorel, Inc., a 
leading mfgr. of picture 
frames and framed art, 
has immediate open- 
ings available for 
Production Workers on 
1 st & 2nd Shifts. 

Apply in Person . 
Mon.-Fd. 8 to 10 am 

DECOREL, INC. 

444 E. Courtland 
Mundefein, IL 

EOE 



WAREHOUSE 
SUPERVISOR 

Wo turva a GREAT oppty.ln the 
Lake Bluff area for an. Indrv, 
w/honda-on axp. and If you hava 
exc. communication akllta, 
Prevloua reapontlbHIry for follow- 
ing up on productivity goola. 

- Send resume to: 
Attn: Personnel 
050 North Shore Dr. 
Lake Zurich, IL 60044 



HIRING 

Full & Parr, time 

Lube technicians. 

Apply At 

LubePros 

Round Lake Beach, IL 

Mallard Creek Shopping PUza 

(near Wal Mart/Omni) 



CNCMill 

• Set-Up/ 
Operator 

Minimum of 5 years 
experience preferred, 

DYNAMIC 
IPRECISIONI 

401 S. Washington Blvd. 

Unit #2 

Mundcloin, IL 

(708) 949-4469 



Cooks 

Full-Time 
GookSs Needed. 

Contact 
Vol Johnson 

Mount St. 
Joseph 

(708) 438-5050 



Customer Service 

$9.50/HR & UP 

Our temporaries tell us it's 
the recognition' and support 
we give them, along with 
our interesting assignments, 
top pay rale and benefits that 
make Olsten the place to bet 
6 positions available. 

If you arc a flexible, people 
person with accurate data 
entry skills, Don't forget, 
Olsten is the place to be. 
Coll: 

OLSTEN 

STAFFING SERVICES 

Liberty vllle 816-8707 

Northbrook 272-0700 

Wheeling 459-1600 

equal opportunity employer 



PRODUCTION ASSEMBLY 

FIRST SHIFT - $8.00/HR. 
SECOND SHIFT - $8.72/HR. 

Effective today - 40 new openings with major Fortune 500 com- 
pany in Liberty viHe/Vernon Hills area. Outstanding opportunity. 

CALL US FOR IMMEDIATE CONSIDERATION!! 
EXPRESS 

(708) 816-8422 
WOMEN AND MINORITIES ENCOURAGED TOAPPLY\ 



Part Time/Full Time 

SALESPEOPLE 

Self-motivated, people oriented, friendly & hard 
working.. Building product knowledge helpful. 
Apply In Person 



Rt. 83 



WOLOHAN 
LUMBER 



Grayslake, IL 



An Equal Opportunity Employer 



CERTIFIED MINORITY 
TEACHERS WANTED 

The Kenosha Unified School District No. 1 wishes to employ 
an increased number of minority teachers in accordance with 
employment goals as stated in its Affirmative Action Plan. 

Employment opportunities for 1994-95 may be available in 
a number of subject areas including, but not limited to, ele- 
mentary, special education,' math, science, foreign language, 
nurtery/pre-ldndwgarten, and home economics. 

Candidates desiring to explore the possibility of relocating 
to a proactive community seeking to attract minority teachers 
are encouraged to meet with Kenosha Unified employment 
representatives at the Ramada Inn, 200 No. Green Bay Road, 
Waukegan, Illinois, oh Tues., March 15. Interviews will be con 
ducted m Room 277 from 5 to 8 pan. 

Evidence of certification and teaching references are 
required prior to finalizing any offer of employment. 
Competitive salaries and benefits are in effect 

Candidates unable to attend may submit letters of interest, 
transcripts, and credentials to the Division of Personnel 
Services, Educational Support Center, 3600-52nd St, Kenosha, 
WI 53144. 

An «pial opportunity en* ucator/cmployer 



220 


Help Wanted 

1 Foil-Time 



220 



Help Wasted 
FctlTtoe 



GENERAL OFFICE 

Full time position available. 
Computer experience preferred. 
Good starting salary with bene- 
fits. Hours 8:00 am - 4:30 pm 
Monday-Friday.. 

Call Peggy 
Walmark Corp. 

(708) 546-0400 
Round Lake Park 



LOVE BABIES? 

A mall order catalog Co; fea- 
turing quality baby products 
needs FT7PT day & evening 
customer service & telephone 
order reps; Order entry exp. 
Exc. communication eWla & 
problem solving abilities 
req'd. Ideal opportunity to 
grow with young Co. in Lake 
Bluff area. Call Ann 

61 5-211 



V 



58 



P0NDER0SA 

NOW. HIRING . 

ALL POSITIONS 

Flexible Hours 

APPLY AT: 

2915-Belvidere Rd. 



Waukegan, IL 



3rd SHIFT 

Midnight to 8:00 a.m. 

FUSTIC INJECTION 
MOLDING FOREMAN 

Full time with overtime, 
benefits. 

Apply In Person 

JAMES 
INJECTION MOLDING 

300 Pfingsten Road 
Northbrook, IL 



BANKING 

We have Ihe following posh 
tlora available tor Individuals 
with stable work background. 

VAULT 
ATTENDANT 

Full Time Waukegan, Mon., 
Tues., Thurs., 8:30am - 5pm, 
Fr., 8:30am • 6pm, sat., 
8:30am • Noon. Assist cus- 
tomers with safe deposit 
rentals, access, billing and 
miscellaneous duties for the 
Operations Department. 
Clerical experience, typing 40 
wpm plus, detail oriented, 
organized, good Interpersonal 
ills and ability to work with 
minimum supervision required. 

BANK OF NORTHERN 
ILLINOIS, NA 

. Ph. 708-623-3800 

for Interview appointment 

equal opportunity •mp!oy«r WF 



Immediate 
openings for 

Fun Time 

Certified 
Lifeguard 

to work with severe 
dcvclopmentajiy disabled 
women, Contact Gail 
Becker. 

Mount 
St. Joseph 

(708) 438-5050 
lake Zurich 



^raSc^SmSSSSSS^^ 






Learn and Earn! WI train $&50$7.KMir+ benefits. Upbeat environ. 



perior JCersonnel 



i 




How To 

Survive 

The Job 

Search 

By Nancy Sakol 

Ql I have been employed with the same company for the past 
eight years. I go to work each day on lime, I do my job well 
and take as little time off as possible. The hours we are 
required to work are 8:30 to 5:00 Monday through Friday with 
one hour for lunch which is very reasonable. My employer has 
always operated his company on the "honor system" meaning 
that we do not punch in or out for work or lunch breaks. We 
do, however, fill out our own time sheets weekly. In the past 
four months we hired a few new employees who seem to be 
taking advantage of not being on a clock. They come in late 
yet never get caught by the boss, they extend their lunch 
breaks to a point of ridiculous, and are ready to leave to go 
home IS minutes before the clock strikes five. The worst part 
about it is that since they have been getting away with it, many 
of the other people in our office are starting to follow their 
lead. I know this is taking clear advantage of our employer as 
he is paying these employees in good faith for a full day's 
work. The employer only sees time slips which always show 
perfect attendance, of course. The employer is such a nice fel- 
low, but doesn't realize he is being ripped off. I feel I should 
inform my employer and explain that his "honor system" is 
turning into a "dishonor system". I have kept my mouth shut 
until now but feel guilty just knowing it is going on. What do 
you suggest? D.W. - Libertyville 

Al A timeclock! First, I would ask your employer if he could 
find some time after work to speak with you. Before you do, 
be sure that you know exactly what it is that you want to say, 
that you are speaking in a professional manner and that you 
are not going to point any fingers at anyone in particular. Let 
him know that you wish your conversation to remain confi- 
dential. Let him know that you value your job and have always 
been loyal and a team player. Most importantly, convey to him 
that you are proud to work for a company that shows trust in 
their workers. Then begin to explain the situation that you see 
escalating... (no names).., and that while you are not coming to 
him to "slam" fellow co-workers, you feel you can offer your 
opinion on how he can correct the situation. Keep in mind that 
employers have so much more on their minds that often these 
problems may slip by unnoticed. Many employers appreciate 
the input and rely on key employees to be their eyes and ears. 
Since your department has.no acting supervisor, perhaps you 
will want to mention that you feel that the department is lack- 
ing just that, and after eight years of dedicated service you are 
willing and capable, Good luckl 

Note: Nancy Sakol is a licensed personnel professional 
and President of Superior Personnel in Gurnee. 
Letters can be sent to Nancy at 5101 Washington St., 
Gumee,IL 60031. 



•>^r 



.-■"•* 



-rt<- ■■' i ■ 



. J. V,»:» " **f ■ 




j] CLASSIFIED UVeUncJ Newspapers M*«ch 11, 1994 







Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full -Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 


Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 

Full-Time 



BURGER 

KING 



In 
Fox Lake 

NOW HIRING! 

CLOSERS 

Call 
(708)587-1414 

To Set Up Imervlow Tlma 



*********** 



JMedlcaMnsldeSaIes$ 

•low to talk on 
tbepbone? 

•P/TorP/T 

•Recognition 
Advancement 

•Base + Commission 

•No exp/Pa\ training 

Call May 
(708)918-9116 
fa 



* * * * * 



HOUSEKEEPING/ 
FLOOR CARE 

Health care facility in 
McHenty County has a full- 
time position available. The 
hours will be 3:00 p.m. 
11:00 p.m. Must be reason- 
able and dependable 

Will train 
Call 

(81$) 344-2600 



Orthodontic 
Assistant 

In a progressive 2 office 
practice. McHcnry/ Long 
Grove. Experience pre- 
ferred. Must be mature, 
dependable and flexible. 
Full or part time 

Call Chris 

(815) 344-2840 



Full or part time expert 
enced ealoeporson for 
on end off premise sales, 
we wilt train, salary & 
commission negotiable. 
Groat opportunity with 
locally owned company 
Horticulture experience 
helpful. 

WRLlf: 

20765 Grass Lake Rd. 
Lake Villa, IL 60046 



ACTIVITY 
ASSISTANT 

Our activity depart- 
ment has a Full Time 
position available Tor 
an Activity Assistant In 
our long-term Health 
Care facility located In 
Long Grove. Ability to 
work with the elderly 
preferred. 

Call Chris 

438-8275 

Mon.-Frl. 

8:30 am - 5:00 pm 



Substitute 

Bus 

Driver 

Immediate openings, 
class B-CDL preferred 
but not required. Starting 
salary 59.00/hour. paid 
training. 

Apply in Person 

Round Lake Area 

School District #116 

District Service Center 

81 IN. Sunset Dr. 
Round Lake, IL 60073 



Priming 

OFFSET PRESSMEN 
2ND PRESSMEN 

FEEDERS 

Flotd Container, a loading Inde- 
pondenl manufacturer of lowing 
cartons, has immediate and excel 
lent opportunities for prosspeopto 
with experience on large and 
medium sized shoolfed olfsoi 
presses. Royal Zenith, Pianola or 
Mtohlo and/or folding carton expe 
rlonco a plus. We oltor a vory com 
pothlve salary, a unlquo 3 1/2 day 
workweek schedule and lull com 
pany benefits Including medical, 
denial, 401K and pension. II you 
are looking for a rewarding and 
challenging job with a successful 
company, please call 708/956 
3224 or come to tho personnel 
office between 8:30am and 
1230pm, Tuesday, Wednesday or 
Thursday. 

FIELD CONTAINER CO. 

1500 Nicholas Blvd. 

Elk Grove Village, IL €0007 

EOE M/RV/H 



ttiminirr 



Assembly & 
Packaging 

•Libertyville Location 
Clean Manufacturing 
Facility 

*Long Term 

1st 4 2nd Shift* 

*30-45 HouriiWeek 
With flexibility 

'Great Opportunity 



Call today for Imme 
diate consideration. 

MANPOWER 

708-918-1200 



a- 



1IWWWU 



Restaurant 

WE'VEGOT 
A LINE ON 

FUN&FLEMBILnY 

Red Lobster, America's num 
bcr one full-service seafood 
dlnncrhousc, Is reedy to lure 
r 'ou In with one of the rollaw* 

ng positions: 

•Walters/ Waitresses 
•Hosts/Hostesses 
•Lino Cooks. 
•Bartenders 
•Alley Coordinators 
•Food Production 
•Dishwashers 

Red Lobster 

900 Lakehurst Rd. 

Waukcgan 

700-473-3500 

We are an equal opportunity employer 

RED LOBSTER 



YOU ALWAYS HIT 
THE MASK WITH 

THE CLASSIFIEDS 



Landscape 

Delivery 

The area's leading 
Interior landscape 
company has a full 
time, year round 
position for Interior 
landscape delivery, 
Responsible for deliv- 
ery of plants and ser- 
vices for commercial 
accounts. Medical, 
dental, profit shar 
Ing. and 401-K avail- 
able. Apply In person 
to Rentokll at 855 E. 
Aptaklslc Road In 
Buffalo Grove. 

For directions call 

(708) 634-4100 



W ..rehouse 

LIGHT INDUSTRIAL 

What Are You Waiting For? 

Wc have excellent paying 
warehouse positions avail- 
able for conscientious, hard- 
working individuals. 

1st SHIFT $8.00/hr 
2nd SHIFT $8.72/hr 

You will be working for a 
leader in the cellular indus- 
try. We have 125 openings ! 
Don't wait another day, call 
now. 

LlbcrlyvWe 816-8707 
Northbrook 272-0700 
Wheeling 459-1600 

OLSTEN 
STAFFING SERVICES 

equal opportunity employer 



S GENERAL OFFICE 

A OPPORTUNITY & VARIETY GALOREI 

ft Light typing 

I (708) 244-0016 



I ___>uperior JterionneL__ — — "; 



1 

8 



Check this 

Section Each 

Week!! 



VyvVMyNN^W'- 





Med. Opportunities 

PHYSICAL REHAB AIDE 

Whitehall North It seeking a 
Physical Rehab Aide to loin our 
rehab teem. Assist with Transport, 
Monitoring, Health Clubs, 
P.R.O.M. & Ambulation. Flexible 
part-time hrs, Mon.-FrL For more 
information please cell: Maureen 
Miller at 708-945-4600 

Whitehall North 

300 Waukegan Rd. 

(ne*r Uk» Cook Rd) 

Doorflold, IL 

Equal Opportunity Employer M/F 



Ami: UN's 

Our long-term care facility currently has a full time 
opening in our 3pm - 1 1pm shift Strong communica- 
tion and supervisory skills preferred. We have a 
warm caring staff, pleasant surroundings and resi- 
dents who lead enriched lives due to care givers 
such as yourself. Interested parties should contact 
Linda Montgomery A.D.O.N. 



610 Peterson Rd. 
Libertyville, IL 
(708) 367-6100 



DAY SUPERVISOR 

OF NURSING SERVICE 

Our intermediate 

skilled facility located 
in Long Grove is seek- 
ing an energetic R.N. 
with sincere interests in 
Geriatric . Nursing. 
Supervisory skills pre- 
ferred. Good benefits & 
competitive salary. 
For info call 
Marilyn at 

(708)438-8275 

between 10-5 pm 
- Monday-Friday - 



Certified Nursing 
Assistants 

Long-term care facility Is now accepting applications tor 
Full & Pan Time positions. We have a warm, caring staff, 
pleasant surroundings and residents who lead enriched 
lives due to care givers such as yourself. Interested par 
lies should contact Linda Montgomery A.D.O.N. 

UBERTYVILLE MANOR 

610 Peterson Rd. 
Libertyville, IL 
(708) 367-6100 




a 



MOUNT SAINT JOSEPH 




< =5=^ r 



Immediate 
openings for 

Direct 

Care 

Workers 

Evening and 
Weekend hours 

only. Full or 

Part Time. 

Willing to train 

for positions. 



CARE 

NIGHT 
SHIFT 



|>lli U.I 



RN/LPN 

Immediate Part- 
Time opening 

11:30am - 8 pm 

and Saturday 

Contact 

Candy Sabay 



Mils! [III lll< 

uvi-UciicK 



il ■ r I v li I inlr. I 






THE RESIDENT IS 

AT THE HEART OF 

ALL WE DO! 



FUat* contact Call Btektr 

(708) 438-5050 




tSt. Rose Dominican Hospital 
l02LUImNmtOtt*'Hm*mmn.NM9QlS 

SKILLED NURSING 
UNIT MANAGER 

St. Rose Dominican Hospital, a division of 
Catholic Healthcare West, one of" the largest 
Catholic health care organizations in the United 
States. We're located in Henderson, Nevada, a 
family oriented community just outside Las Vegas, 
where residents enjoy a healthy economy and ho 
state Income tax. 

Opportunity knocks on the ground floor of a new 
in-house Skilled Nursing Unit. Be a part of 
developing a dynamic program while working 
with professionals in an atmosphere of compassion. 



QUALIFICATIONS 



BSN or Bachelors Degree in Health Care or 
Related Field 

Knowledge of Gerontological Process 
2 - 3 Years Experience in Acute Based or 
Long-Term Skilled Facility Required 
Working Knowledge of Medkare/McdicalcL 
JCAHO, & Federal/State Regulations 
2-4 Years Leadership Experience 



Excellent Benefits/Competitive Salaries 
Contact: Juanita Claridy 
Human Resources 
' (702)564-4657 eoe/mp/h/v 



220 



Help Wanted 

Fall-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
FuU-Tlme 



We are currently 

seeking a 

Developmental 
Trainer 

Immediate 
full Time Opening 

CONTACT 
GAIL BECKER 
(708)438-5050 

Mount 
St. Joseph 

Lake Zurich 



DATA ENTRY 

En try* Level 

We ato a modern clflca with pleas- 
ant working conditions and oxecp- 
ilonally-good benefits, needing to 
Increase our prosenl stall duo to 
our oxpandlng work load. ' 

Requirements lor- this position 
Include computer familiarity with 
spreadsheet oxporlonco and 
knowlodgo ol WordPeilocl. 
Previous oxperlonco In scheduling 
or production control would bo 
exlromety helpful. 

Wo offor a good starting wago plus 
bonoliis including health, dental, 
101k, etc. Send rosumo or call: 

Lance Nelson 

MID-WESt 

AUTOMATION 

SYSTEMS, INC. 

1400 Busch Pkwy.. 
Buffalo Grove, IL 60089 
(708) 541-3570 ext. 313 

An equal opportunity omptoyor mnVd 



- ASST. BRANCH MANAGER =* 

Thin person should have supervisory experience 
as well as experience in both teller and customer 
service areas. Strong organizational skills and 
self -motivated. Strong computer skills are a plus. 

FULL-TIME TELLER 

Teller experience strongly preferred. Cashiering or 
cash handling experience will be considered. 

Suburban Bank Lake County 

(708) 913-0900 

Apply in person at 

1 17S Corporate Woods Pkwy. 

U Vernon Hills Jfl 



BBBBBHBHHHBBHHBnnHBHBBHHnB . 

I GENERAL | 
E FACTORY 3 

1st & 2nd Shifts ci 

B Transformer mfgr. needs men & women for assem-CJ 
Bbly, inspection, and packing assignments. We needU 
Ejenergotic, sell-starters & team players! L* 

•4 Day - 40 Hour Work Week, Mon.-Thurs. j g 
•Life, Health & Dental Benefits ... rj 

•401 K Retirement Plan rj 

•Paid Vacation & Holidays a 

Apply in Person To: U 

ACTOWN ELECTROCOIL S 

C 2414 Highview St. Spring Grove, 1L-60081 O 
V (815)675-6641 

EHHQaUSHSBQSBHBHBHBHBauaBa. 



n 
n 

c 

B 
D 
C 
D 
D 



Professional 
Sales 

Call on area business owners to interest them 
in our barter network of over 1,000 companies, 
Trading brings them new business and great 
savings! We are in our 11th year; well estab 
lished. Our client list would surprise you. 

If interested in a dynamic new field with sig- 
nificant earning potential, call Mrs. Hacker, 
V.P. Midwest Trade Exchange 689-2300. We 
offer training salary, commissions, and excel- 
lent benefits. : 



SECRETARY/ 
ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT 

Decorel Is Ihe world's largest Independent manufacturer of picture 
frames and framed art. Fast paced, pleasant working 
environment. We currently have three openings Ion 

(1) Manufacturing Admin. Asst: Work directly for our V.P. ol 
Manufacturing. 

(2) Marketing/Sales Admin, test: Work directly for Director of 
Marketing & V.P. National Accounts. 

(3) Distribution Secretary (Entry Level): Work dlrectty for Director 
ol Distribution. 

Strong PC (WP 5.1, Lotus 123} and communicallve skills 
required. Competitive compensation/bonus package. Send 
resume with salary history and requirements to: Dan Marquez 
Human Resources, 444 E. Courtland St., Mundeleln, IL 60060. 
EOE. ' ' 



225 



Business .. 
Opportunities 




Business 
Opportunities 



BUSINESS FOR SALE- 
COMBINED WHOLESALE/ 
RETAIL *No vending 'Serv- 
ice Established Retail Ac- 
courts 'No soliciting •PT/FT 
•$1 1.50O Investment. 

1/600770-7007, 

SUNQUEST WOLFF TAN- 
NING BEOS. New commer- 
cial- home unfts. From 
$109.00. Lamps- Lotions). 
Accessories. Monthly pay- 
ments low as 910.00. Call 
today Free new color cata- 
log. 1/800-462-9197. 



TERRIFIC PAY! INTER- 
ESTING Work! Assemble 
products at home. Call 
(513)244-9709 Ext. 2009, 
recorde d message. 



240 



Child Care 



ANTIOCH MOM HAS 2- 

openlngs In our home. 
Meals, snacks and many ac- 
tivities are provided. Before 
and alter school care also 
available. Any age welcome. 
(700) 630-0042. 




MaicMI, 1994 UIceIancJ Newspapers CLASSIFIED 




1 fl GdbdVRimtarc 



240 



Child Care 



240 




BABYSITTING SERVICES 
AVAILABLE 6am-Gpm, Lota 
ot toys, teaming acilvHIos 
and meals. Roasonablo 
rates. Call (615) 676-3705. 

BABYSITTING. CARING 
MOTHER of 1, will babysit In 
my home, either shift. Refer- 
ences. Reasonable rales 
(414)654-0115 

CHILDCARE NEEDED FOR 

2yr,otd boy. In our Waucon- 
da home, Mon-Frt. 7:30am- 
5:30pm. Experienced. Non- 
smoker. Car and references. 
(708) 4B7-O031 , altar 7pm. 

CHILDCARE NEEDED IN My 
Grayslake home for 3/chlb-- 
ren, 1or2 days per week, 
2pm-9pm. Own transporta- 
tion necessary. (708) 
546-6139. 

DAYCARE PHOVIDED IN 
Mundeteln home by Licens- 
es Practical Nurse with Syrs. 
experience In Early Child- 
hood. Working with 20yr.old 
assistant wtlh 3yrs. experi- 
ence In Early ChHdhood. 
Plenty of stories, art projects 
and other planned activities 
dally. (708) 586-8372. 

CNA/MOM,has openings for 
childcare, In my Fox Lake 
home, ages, 1+up. Meats 
provided. Years of Expert-, 
ence. Reasonable. Alter- 
school available. Off Rollins/ 
Ingle side station. (708) 
587-5211. " 

EXPERIENCED DAYCARE 
MOM, Has 1 /full-time open- 
ing (full or part-time) In my 
safe, non-smoking; pet-free 
homeLots ol TLC and funl 
Excellent references. Round 
Lake Beach. Near Rte.83/' 
Rollins (708) 740-0924. 

GRANDMA WILL BABYSIT 
(n my Round Lake Beach 
home, meals, snacks, & home- 
made goooles provided, pten-' 
ry ol toys & TLC. Sam- 5pm. 16 
months & Up. (706)740-0306. 

INFANT CHILDCARE NEED- 
ED In my Lake Zurich home, 
tun-time, beginning April 25.. 
Non-smoker. Own transporta- 
tion. References required. 
(708)726-1820. 



MOM HAS OPENINGS In 

her licensed Graystake home 
Man-Wed. Ages Gwka. to 
4yrs. Lots of Fun, TLC, acl^ 
ties, and toys. Reliable- 
Great references. Call Kalhy 
(708) 548-1238. 

MOM WILL CARE lor your 
child in my Licensed child 
care home. Ages 2-1/2 and 
up. Country Walk Subd. Call 
Dobbio (708) 265-1514. 

MONDAY MORNING MOM'S ' 
OFFERS Rejiable quality 
care for Infants- Preschool- 
' era, Insured monitored. (706) 
497-4MOM (4666). 

MUNDELEIN MOM WILL 
provide . worry-free ,chHd care. 
Excellent references. .Many, 
years experience, huge play- 
room, fenced yard, Infants 
welcome; (708) 049-6184. 

MY WAUCONDA HOME off- 
era . Experienced and Excel- 
• lent care lor your. newborn to 
Syrs.old, Mon-Frt. until 
4:30pm. (708) 526-0109. 

NEEDED: NURTURING PER- 
SON for 5/day, a week care, 
2/daughters ages 4&6, In 
our Graystake home. Must 
have own transportation. 
Please cal (708) 680-751 1 . 

SE SOLICIT A UNA persona 
para cuktar una infante y 
una nlna 3-1/2 altos, de 
Lunes a Jueues. Referen- 
clas • necesarios. Teletono: 
(708) 497-4904. . 

DAYCARE- ISLAND LAKE- 

Christian home. References. 
Insured. 18yrs. experience. 
(706) 526-4662. 

LICENSED, STRUCTURED 
IN-HOME Childcare. "Daily 
activities, games, meats pro- 
vided In clean Grayslake 
home.** 2-Openlngs for 
children ages i/up. Call 
(708)223-3006. 

WANTED- BABYSITTER- for 
good natured 8-month' old, 
3/days per week In our Ver- 
non H|hs home. Non-smoker. 
Transportation required. Eng- 
lish speaking. (312)609- 
4254, days or (706) 
549-6005, days or eves. 



314 


BuUtteig Materials 



HARDWOOD FLOORING- 
BRUCE Woarmaster, acrylic 
Impregnated, classic cocoa 
(maple) 3/8*x3inch, 150sq.ft. 
A 51,200 VALUE. Sacrifice 
$700. LENNOX GAS forced 
air down How furnace, 
82,0O0Btu, $200. All Prices 
Firm. Call Anytime (708) 
223-4710. 



318 


Business/Office 
Equipment 


BUSINESS COPY MACHINE- 
Uke new. Many features. 
Cost $2,200. Sell . $550. 
(708) 729-3630. 


OFFICE DIVIDERS, SIZE 

72x48 Must sell. Excellent 
condition. Best offer (708) 
501-4944. 


320 


EfcctronJcs 
Computers' 



386 SX COMPUTER, color 

monitor, 24-pln printer, ■ 
mouse, Windows, WordPer- 
fect and Many more. Pro- 
grams. $1,l00/best offer. 
Call Shayne (414) 

694-1162, leave message. 

COLECOVISION VIDEO 

SYSTEM game, with base- 
ball Joysticks, refer controller, 
expansion module 1&2, and 
20' cassette game tapes, 
$75/best offer. (708) 
395-3799, after 5pm. 

COLUMBIA COMPUTOR 

with printer, IBM compatible 
Viewer printer. $450. (414) 
877-2884. 

COMPUTER- 66068 CPU 

640k Ram in desk-top case, 
CGA ■ display monitor, 40 
Megablte harddrive, (1)low 
density 3-1/2' floppy drive, 
(1)Low density 5-1/4' floppy 
drive, harddrive, some soft- 
ware loaded, most books 
and disks Included, good 
working computer, $400. 
Best otter (708) 395-0731, 
after 4pm. , 

FOR SALE- MACINTOSH 
SE computer, 2-1/2 MB mem- 
ory, 20 MG harddrive, key- 
board, cordless mouse, pro- 
grams, modem, CD Rom. 
$995.(708)395-7096. 



STATE- APPROVED SMALL 
WONDERS GROUP DAY- 
CARE HOME, has openings 
for children 6wks to 12yre. 
6yrs. teaching experience In 
daycare and a background 
in early childhood education. 
Nutritious meals provided. 
Discounts for 2 or more child- 
ren. Call Cathy, (708) 
356-5993. 

ISLAND LAKE MOM wHI care 

for your child full-time. Lots 
of TLC. References. Lunch 
and snacks provided. Experi- 
enced with all ages. (708) 
487-0418. 




CDL QUALIFIED IN 3- 
WEEKS. Weekend Training 
Available. Job placement as- 
sistance. Call NOW 1/800- 
332-7364, Diesel Driving 
School, Sun Prairie, Wl. 



ALL WELL SEASONED 
HARDWOOD. Free Imme- 
diate Delivery. Free Stack- 
ing. $6S/face cord. 
5180/iull face cord. (615) 
477-4666.' 



Check this 

Section Each. 

Week!! 



• 



330 



Gauge 
Rummage Sale 




301 


■ Antiques 




Grayslake 

Antipes 

& 
Collectibles 

Lake County 
Fairgrounds 

Grayslake, Illinois 
Illinois 120 & U.S. 45 

8:00 a.m. • 4 p.m. 

SUNDAY 
MARCH 13 

ADMISSION *3.00 



t 



STACK ABLE WASHER 

DRYER UNIT. Good working 
order, remodeling, do not 
need! $150. Fox Lake 
area.(708) 973-2309. 



AFTER YOUR BIG Sale, and 
you st II have things that Just 
did not go.... Call LAKE- 
LAND Newspapers and run it 
under the 'FREE/Givea- 
ways' section, at No Change! 
(708)223-8161. 

MOVING! 6171 GOLFVIEW 
Dr, Gumee, oft Hwy 21 and 
Gages Lake Rd. Fri-Sat-Sun. 
9am-5pm. Furniture, patio, 
toys, TV;s Misc. Good 
STUFFI 




310 



Bazaars/Grafts 



FAIR S? 
BAKE SALE 

NORTH WOOD 
MIDDLE SCHOOL 

IN WOODSTOCK NORTH OF 
TOWN ON HIGHWAY 47 

OVER60CRAFTER3 
■ RAFFLESRAFFLES-RAFFLE3 

QaitwidonaklWnifor 

dr swing •vwy M minute* 

SbntAuefon 

ItoflitdorulKlbyNWMS 
lacutty/famliei 



338 



Horses ftTacks 



HAY, ALL KINDS, grass and 
artalla. $2.£O-$3.O0/bale. 
Straw, $2.7S/bale (708) 
395-6459 or (41 4)843-3630. 

TRAILER WANTED: HORSE 

or Stock. Bumper or Goose- 
neck. Any. oondltlon. Also 
looking lor Trail Horse. 
CASHI (414) 593-804B. . 



10yr.old THOROUGHBRED 
Bay Mare, 16.2H, smooth 
and true hunter/)umper. 
Good Intermediate horse. 
$2.500. (708) 740-4241. 

9 YEAR TB, Chestnut mare, 
lumper, 16.3H, needs experi- 
enced rider, $2,500. 
(7081438-2458. 



■J 



340 



Household Goods 
.'. Furniture 



EASY CHAIR, SOFA, and 

Loveseat. Blue, mauve; and 
cream tones. Excellent con- 
dition, MUST SELL! $550. 
(708)548-1048. 

QUEEN ANNE STYLE bed- 
room, complete $1,100. Din- 
ing room set, $1,700 Cherry. 
ALSO Sleigh bedroom set, 
$1,745. All In PERFECT con- 
dition. ' MUST . SELL) 
(708)548-1045. 

10-pfeee PTT GROUP; Mens 

leather Jacket, size 42. Call 
after 5:30pm, (815) 
385-4451. 

ANTIQUE ROUND OAK ped- 
estal table, $450. Set ol 
5/presa back chairs. $425. 

(414)534-6539. 

BEAUTIFUL BRASS AND 

glass contemporary wall unit ■ 
for stereo, TV, etc. Originally 
$1,100 asking $350 Alter 
7 pm (706) 566-2565. 

BLUE AND WHITE Bunk- 
beds with dresser/slide. Like 
new. Must sell $400 (708) 
526-1187, leave message. 

BRASS BED, QUEEN with 
orthopedic mattress set, un- 
used, stll boxed, cost $1,000 
sell: $325. Delivery available 
(706) 449-7106. 

CONTEMPORARY 2-plece 
Sectional with queen bed, 
$300 (3)piece (rontroom set, 
$350. Mlnrture Pool table 
$75; Mlnlure Air Hockey set, 
$100. Evenings . (708) 
566-3719, or Days (708)949- 
2800. 

COUCH, VERY VERY good 
condition, Must seel $75. 
(708) 587-6254, alter 5pm. 

DAYBED- WHITE IRON 
and Brass, with 2/orthopedic 
mattresses, AND pop-up trun- 
dle, unused, stlli boxed, cost 
$800- sel $325. Delivery avail- 
able. (708) 449-7108. 

ESTATE SALE 
EVERYTHING MUST GOD 
222 E. LINCOLN, LIBERTY- 
VILLE. HOUSE AND ALL 
CONTENTS!! FRIDAY and 
SATURDAY, March 11th, 
12th from 8:00am till?? 

HANDCRAFTED L-SHAPED 
WOOD bar with 4/stools 
$350 Whirlpool air condtlon- 
er. $125. (708) 223-61 53. 

(2)PAIR ACCOUSTIC, Home 
stereo speakers $150; Excel- 
lent condition. . (815) 
477-3605 or (815)477-8533. 

MODEL HOME CONTENTS, 
Sola/Loveseat set, Hunter 
Green and Cranberry, new 
$595, other sets plaids etc. 
Dining room set 10 piece, 
$1,595. From Builders 
Model Home. (708)329- 
4119. . 

OAK TABLE FOR BEHIND 
couch with glass top, 
$75foest. Stereo cabinet 
with glass door, Lift-up top 
for CD player and 2/sherves, 
holds complete stereo sys- 
tem, (708)785-0140, leave 
message or after 5pm. 

PANASONIC TWIN POWER 
microwave, works great. 
$175mesl offer (708) 
546-8806. 



304 



Appliances 



FRIGIDARE ELECTRIC 

STOVE, excellent condition,- 
$90. (708) 356-6265. 




BALED 
iSHAVINGS 

''aj^L^S y*» Delivery Available 
if ^ \fo.Hay, Straw & Horet F* 





Feed 



Plus Much More 



(414) 887-28213 

Mon.-Frl.8-5 Sat. 8-3 



PANASONIC TWIN POWER 

microwave, works great. 
$200A)est ofler (708) 
546-6806. 

QUEEN SIZE 6-DRAWER 
WATERBED set. Chest of 
drawers, Dresser with mirror, 
ntghtsland.v Everything 
goes, including sheets, com- 
forters. SSOOAest offer (708) 
623-4764. 

REC ROOM SALE- 'Cres- 
cent* shaped wood/ leather 
bar with shelf light and 
6/matching stools; Authentic 
Guitar shaped - Miller Beer 
neon sign; Hamms fluores- 
cent bar sign, Moosehead 
Beer plaque, Vee-Ba-Rova 
Vodka wall . clock, 

(2)numbered prints beautiful- 
ly framed. All In excellent 
condition. (414) 279-0714. 

SOFA, 2/chalra, matching 

cocktail tables, Imported 
from Italy. French Provincial 
oil-white wood, handpalnt- 
ed, carved, cream .velvet, 
crystal glass top tables with 
Inlaid onyx, lamps. Value: 
$12,000 -sacrifice $4,200 
(708) 394-6654. 

SOLID CHERRY' CHINA 

CABINET, 6350/beal. offer. 
(810) 459-0208, 

STORE CLEARANCE! FULL 
size freezer $120; Daybed 
with 2/rnattresses, $150. 
Dressers up to $80. Sofa 
bed, $75; Recline r sofa and 
matching love seat $175. 
Bar stands $25-550. And 
MUCH MOREI Everything 
mum GO by March 27th. 
CALL U.S.T. GOODS- (706) 
623-4811, leave message. 



344 



Jewelry 



MUST SACRIFICE! Lades 1/3 
carat soltalre diamond ring.slze 
6. $350. (706)740-3871. 



348 



Liwo/Gudea 



ARIENS 2stage 8hp 24-inch. 
•now blow* r, Perfect condi- 
tion. $575/best offer (708) 
526-6157. 

BEAUTIFUL THICK SCOTCH 

Pines. We tag., or come out 
and tag your own. Starting 
March 1st. Taking orders for 
spring planting. (I0)or more 
trees delivered and planted, 
4ft-5fl. $65/each. 5ft.-6ff. 
trees $85/each. (815) 
338-3348. 

CHAIN LINK FENCE 

55.25/llnear foot Installed. 
Custom wood available. Re- 
pair service available. (815) 
344-4007 

FOR THE SERIOUS GAR- 
DENER ONLYI Heirloom to- 
mato plants, exotic melon 
plants, new and unusual 
vegetable plants. For 
something different In your 
garden call for our 1994 var- 
iety list. (815) 385-3162, 
after 4pm. _T_. 

GARDEN TILLERS- REAR- 
Tine Troy-flltt Tilers, at low 
direct from factory prices. For 
Free Catalog with prices, 
special Savings Now In Ef- 
fect, and Model Guide, call 
Toil free 1/600-922-4600, 
dept.4. 

SNOWTHROWER, JD„ 

387INCH fls tracktor Models 
130-185, like new, manual 
available. $350. (815) 
943-4774,. 




(2JCHICAGO HEALTH CLUB 
memberships President Plus 
$500 each or best offer 
(708) 395-9338. 

(2)CHILDREN ELEMENTA- 
RY SCHOOL desk with 
chairs, $20; Nintendo with 
10/tapes, $100; 4/tires with 
aluminum wheels, fair 
shape, size P215/60R14, 
$200. Paid $900. (708) 
546-4263 

ADVERTISING A REC 
ROOM SHOW. Beer signs, 
slot machines, pinbalb, Coca- 
Cola, Much morel Sunday 
MARCH 13th, lOam-Spm: 
Serb Hall, S101 W. Oklaho- 
ma, Milwaukee. Info 
414/246-7171. 

1994 ENCYCLOPEDIA SET. 

Major Brand. New, still In 
box. Originally $1,200. 
MUST SELL1 $295. (708) 
660-0585, 



350 



Miscellaneous 



350 



MlkeUaaeoo* 



410 DOUBLE BAREL shot- 
gun; fberglass cap with spit 
windows; pair snowmobile 
jackets. B.Menarok. (414) 
652-7579. 

MOVING SALE! ELECTRON- 
IC water pump, $125. Go- 
Karl Honda. Z250 Mini trail 
bike, $475/each. Garden 
tools, , Leaf blower, ' chain 
saw, (70S) 740-6622 after 
5pm. 

MUST SELL! PIANO- Henry 
Miller $700; Snowbird Snow- 
blower $100; Power Pack ex- 
cerslze equipment, $75; 
Shower door 22-5/8 x 25-3/B 
x64-3/4\ stin In box $100; 5- 
plece white (win bedroom 
set, needs repair $50; Light 
fixture, never used, $100. 
(708)402-4556 days or. alter 
6pm (414) 694-6835. 

NEW AND USED ITEMS! 
Priced lower than Resale 
Stores. Housewares, cloth- 
ing, toys and misc. Kerns. I'll 
come to You! (706) 
244-2959. 

NEW SPAS CUSTOM BUILT 
5 to 7 person. Wholesale 
prices. Must seel (708) 
304-5337. . 

PAN BRAKE 5FT. hand, 12 
gauge capacity wflh dies, ex- 
cellent condition, $3,500/rirm 
(414) 653-0212. 

PELLA atl. SLIDING door 
with screen, great condilon, 
$500 (706) 249-2329; 

PRECIOUS MOMENTS: 

Rsvfon perfume cosmetics: 
50% OFF; Comic Books; 
Grandfather c!ock, $600; 
1971 Bulek Riviera, $600 
(81 51 477-4027 



■EEBEEEEBHBg 

S NEW SPAS g 

g . 5-7 PERSON B 
B WHOLESALE PRICES H, 

g (708)304-5337 g 
g l-flOO-772-0020 g 

■EEEBBBEBEEB 



354 



Medial Equip 
Supplies 



COMMODE FOR SALE BY 
MEDICARE, Wll sel for $50. 
(706) 587-1279. 

WHEEL CHAIR $50; WOOD 
Ramp 2 sections 45*x202* 
$1 Softest offer (706) 
526-6464, 



358 



Musical Instrument! 



ACCORDtANS: 3/ROW BUT- 
TON accordlan, also 4/row 
burton accordlan. (706) 
662-2610. 

HAMMOND CORD ORGAN, 
Plays great, Mahogany fin- 
ish. $200. (706) 497-9343. 

MUSICIANS. 8-plece Tama 

Drum kl, wfth ZWjlan cym- 
bals, $1,500 Peavey 4-chan- 
nel lOOwatt mixer, $250. 
Marshall Mosfet 100 watt, 
amp with 4-10 cablnats. 
$300 K-1-11 synthesizer, 
$300 (615) 344-4310.' 

PIANO- CONN, EXCELLENT 

condition, $950. (414) 
654-2527. 

WURLITZER SPINNET 

PIANO Mini condilon, hardy 
used. 6yrs. old. Asking 
$850*est. (615) 943-3256, 
anytime. 




S09 


Builders 



S72 



Professional 

Services 



STEEL BUILDING 
FACTORY SPECIALS 

1,200 -10.000 sq.ft. 
Limited supplies. Must 
sell by 3/29. Call Peter 

(815) 943-2243 




MEAN MAIDS- WE Hate and 
Terminate Dlrtt Will clean 
Navy quarters, guaranteed 
to pass Inspection, also 
house cleaning. References. 
(706) 726-2041 .call Tlly. 



S42 



Landscaping 



CHOICE BILLING SERVIC- 
ES Professional, Accurate, 
Prompt Invoice Preparation 
and Receivables manage- 
ment Call Sherlynn (708) 
546-5656 

Sewing- ALTERNATIONS 
AND DRESSMAKING SERV- 
ICE- Experienced. Fast Pro- 
feeaional service. Reason- 
able. Call (7 06) 669-0563. 

****** ** %* ** ** «*** *• 

** PIANO-ORGAN-* 
< ACCORDION 5 

*> Teach In your home jt 
*J All Ages 5 

**. Professional Teacher * 
$(706)336-7778 $ 

**%***************** 



AN EARLY OPPORTUNITY 
TO JOIN The Areas Premier 
Lawn Malntalnce Service. 
Great Prices. Free Esti- 
mates. LAWN PROS. (815) 
477-4669. 





BATHROOM AND KITCHEN 
REMODELING. Specializing 
In cultured marble and tile. 
Complete, total remodeling 
of bathroom and kitchen, 
loyrs. experience. FREE Es- 
timates. Reasonable rates. 
DAVE (708) 567-7643. 



MOVING? RENT A STOR- 
AGE on WHEELS Moving 
Van. Short tern rental, pack- 
ing, and boxes available. 
(708) 395-8544. 

MOVING?? CALL BOB The 

Mover. Furniture; pianos; 
safes; restaurant equipment; 
Light machinery. Lift gate 
van and smal crane trucks. 
PACK RAT Enterprises. 
(708)662-1956. 




J.F. ENTERPRISES- Com- 
plete Tree Care Service! 
'Specializing In Dangerous 
Tree Removal, Trim, Stump 
Removal Tree Planting 
'Custom Landscaping 'Re- 
taining Walls 'Rock Gardens 
'Rock Sea Walla Top Soil 
'Bob-cat Back Hoe Service, 
1706) 638-1177. 




TYPING SERVICES, A/P; 
A/R. Mcintosh background, 
own Lazer printer. Any. size 
Job. Call Loretta 

(708)223-6072. 




TREE & STUMP 
REMOVAL 

Land Clearing 
Seasoned Hardwood 

Nordstrom Ttee 
Experts Co. 

(Fully Insured) 
708-526-0858 



SUMP PUMP SALES and 
SERVICE. We also Install 
the Protector back-up sys- 
tem. Emergency Service 
Available. (706) 973-0935. 



S99 



Miscellaneous 
Services 



Check this 

Section Each, 

Week!! 



/ 



*T.* 



> 



BOTTLED WATER COOL- , > 
ERS LEASING Agent has 
coolers for sale as low as 
$95. Fun Guarantee. Ask for. 
Greg. (615) 675-6430, for in- 
formation. 



w M't«v*« t.^jm. 



■» / . .M.Wf^ir ^ i » .r ».^..«n* i« ji *.-.»- ■■ 



p ^~*'*»iii* ...... 



«. ,nf. 



<M 




CLASSIFIED UkdANd Newspapers MarcIi 11,1994 









PetsA 

Supplies 



8-month old Vietnamese 
Potbelly Pig, very friendly, 
great temporment, inter 
trained. Asking $150 (708) 
487-1702. 

AKC LABRADOR RETRIEV- 
ERS, black or yellow, shots, 
dewclaws, females, males. 
Starting at Si SO. (414) 
763-2948. after 6pm, 

AKC SHELTY PUPPY, 1/Ie- 
malo, dewclaws removed, 
1st shots. $275. (708) 
223-5990. - 

AQUARIUMSI 20 GALLONS- 
$20; 55 GALLON- $55. ALL 
FIRSTS, NOT SECONDS. 
SECONDNATURE FILTERS 
S12AJP LARGEST VOLUME 
DEALER. FLYERS SENT TO 
YOU I AQUATIC WORLD. 
(414)567-7339. 

BICHON FRIESE AKC, 

shots, wormed, $150/up. 
(815)726-0424. 

Boarding- RESPONSIBLE 
ADULTS WILL cam tar your 
dog or puppy. Excellent ref- 
erences. Call for detail*: 
(708)968-6319, Florence. 

DALMATtON, FEMALE, TO 
GOOD HOME With fenced-in 
yard, without chldren. few or 
no other pets. 4yrs.otd. Not- 
spayed. Purebred with pa- 
pers. (708)223-8150, Rob 
after 6pm. 

DOBERMAN, AKC, BLUE fe- 
male. Wonderful temper- 
ment, 3yrs. old. Good with 
kkfa, $200. (708) 566-9540 

ENGLISH SPRINGER SPAN- 
IEL pups, black/white. Par- 
ents on premises. AKC, Only 
$250. 3/lemales. (815) 
338-0133. 

SIAMESE KITTENS. Male 
and tomato. Chocolate Point 
OR Seal Point. Ready Now! 
Call (70S) 438-3306, after 
Bom. 




GREAT PYRENEES PUP- 
PIES, lather extra large. 
GENTLE GIANTS. $300 
(815) 522-3520, or (708)546- 
3312. 

PARROT- YELLOW NAPED 
Amazon, great talker, with 
floor cage, $90QA>eat offer. 
Allor 7pm (708) 623-1 106. 

POODLE PUPS- AKC, TOY, 
TINYS, Calm disposition, 
homo raised with TLC. Col- 
ors. Health guarantee. (608) 
524-3669 of (414)843-3656. 

AKC PUPPIES- LHASA 
APSO Schlpporke, Spitz, 
Cotlle, Pomeranian, 

Keeshond, Schnauzer, 

Blchon Frtese Dachshund, 
Basset, Akfta, Rottweiler, 
Fox Terrier. Some mixed 
breeds. More coming. 
(708)249-5444, Off708) 336- 
5444. 

PUPPIES- AKC LABS, 9 

4tolack, $225/each. 1 /yet- 
low, $275. Had shots. Moth- 
er on premises, have pa- 
pers. (708)746-1857. 

RARE MIX- TiMtan Mastiff 
and Rottweiler puppies. Par- 
ents on premises. $250. 
Going fasti (708) 395-4557, 

after 5pm. 

ROTTWEILER PUPS, AKC, 

(4)males, (4)!omates. Ready 
NOW! Both parents on prem- 
ises. Cal alter 2pm Mon-Frl. 
Anytime Sat. Sun. (708) 
546-5662. 

SHELTIE PUPPIES AKC, 

shots, wormed, family raised, 
blues, Iris and sables. Great 
dispositions. $250-$300. 
(815)948-2001. 

SHIH TZU PUPPIES, regis- 
tered AKC & WWKC. Dew- 
claws, wormed, shots. Par- 
ents on premises. Home 
raised. (414) 857-6615. 

9 SIX WEEK OLD PUPPIES 

available. Call (703)570-0548. 



I HELPED SAVE A SMALL LIFE TODAY! 

The Assisi 

Animal 
Foundation 

ONE CAN 

MAKE A 

DIFFERENCE... 

TOGETHER WE'LL 

MAKEAMIRICLE. 

GIFTS ARE 

TAX DEDUCTIBLE. 

NOT FOR 

PROFIT... 

VOLUNTEER 



We don't destroy homeless 
animalsl They live their full lives 
uncaged il not adopted. We spay 
and neuter, conduct a dynamic pet 
visitation/therapy program for the 
elderly, provide education 
programs (or young people and 
oiler a special "pet retirement" 
program. THANK YOU FOR 
YOUR HELP! 



I Address 



I 



I City, St 

I Zip Code 

'individual Membership $15 - 

■Family Membership $20 Donation $ 

Please mail to: Assisi Animal Foundation 



I 

.P.O.B. 143 Crystal Lake, IL 60014 (815) 455-9411 J 



364 



Restaurant 
Equipment 



370 



Wanted To Boy 



ATTN: RESTAURANT AND 

BAR OWNERSI Tepco 
Smoke eater air Ionizer also 
removes dust, motd and pol- 
len. Ideal for tavern or res- 
taurant. Only $750 (414) 
534-2666 Ask for Gtenrt or 
Dale. . 



370 



Wanted To Buy 



GUNS- LICENSED GUN Col- 
lector wll buy your oM gun or 
not so ok) guns. Wll pick up. 
(708) 623-2300 or 
(706))244-8166. 

Slot Machine* WANTED- 
ANY CONDITION- or Parte. 
Also JUKE BOXES, MUSIC 
BOXES, Nickelodeon and 
Coke Machine*. Paying 
CASHI Call (706)985-2742. 



PIANOS: CASH FOR ALL 
TYPES. OLD UPRIGHTS 
ALSO. WE PAY FOR THE 
MOWNa (414) 248-6491. 

WANTED TO BUY- Small 
portable dishwasher, eve- 
rything working, reason- 
able. (414)857-2127. 

WANTED- USED ALUMI- 
NUM MARTIN HOUSES. 
(414) 857-2619 or 

(414)654-8492. 



P 



^ 



OLD ORIENTAL 

RUGS WANTED 

Any size or cond 
Call free 1400-553402I 




500 



Homes For Sale 




}T|J Homes For Sale 



2-BEDROOM BRICK RANCH 

ON Wsukogan's north side. 
2. Scar dclnchod garage, 
spacious living room dining 
roomcomblnallon. Largo oat- 
In kitchen with pantry, 
plaster, hardwood floors, lots 
ol closets, large dry base- 
ment with partial bath and 
tons ol possbilltkts. A Roal 
Value at $05,0001 CaU (708) 
362-7336. 

4-YEAR NEW 3-Bodroom, 2- 
lulllbaths, 2. 5 car garage Trt- 
lovel. Fully finished base- 
ment, fenced In yard, duck, 
central air, $110,900 Round 
Lako Beach. (70S) 
740-3622. 

ANTIOCH- 3-BEDROOM, 
2.5bath Colonial located on 
quiet cul-do-sac with SOIL 
Irontago on small lake, not 
channel. 2yrs. new. Exposed 
basement, 2car attached ga- 
rage, ((replace, central air, 2- 
story family room. Enjoy wil- 
dlife Including deer, geese, 
and bass fishing. 1111 
Edgewater. $225,000 (708) 
395-7029. 

BEAUTIFUL 3-BEDROOM, 3- 
BATH Raised Ranch with 
huge Great Room, attached 
garage. Way too many up- 
grades to llstl 300ft. from 
Long Lake with lake rights. 
Dead-end street, no traffic. 
Great for raising chlldron. 
$145.900 (708) 546-6948. 

BY OWNER, 4-BEDROOM 

home on 2/tots in unincor- 
porated Lake County. Extra 
large newer garage. 
$58,000. (708) 546-0356, 
(708)740-2131, Bob. 



PRAIRIE GROVE/CRYS- 
TAL LAKE- 1+ acre, new 
constructln, 2,000 sq, ft. raised 
ranch, 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2- 
M2 car garage, cathedral cell- 
ing, air conditioning, wood 
deck, oak cabinets, flooring 
and appliance allowance. 
Choose your own colors. 
$140,000. Tynlo b«!!dcs. 
(815)477-9741 or (815)344* 
1160. 



WAUKEGAN, BY OWNER. 
Quiet neighborhood 
$86,900. N»wiy decorated 
4/bedroom 2-batht, dining 
room, kitchen. Fencad 
backyard, full basement. 
508 Pine, Waukegan. (708) 
549-9400. 

SPRING GROVE CEDAR 

with brick ranch 3-bedroom, 
1.4 ac. Full basement, 2- 
bath, 2-car garage, fireplace. 
$179,900 (815)675-2168. 



FOX LAKE- LARGE Deluxe 

Cedar/Brick 2-story With Eng- 
lish basomont on 1 -acre + 4- 
bedroom, 2.5balh, Jacuzzi, 
fireplace, 3-cor garage. TOO 
MANY UPGRADES TO LIST! 
Low near-completion price. 
Financing available. 
$259,900. DEAL DIRECT 
WHh BUILDER and SAVE. 
(708) 526-8306. 

ROUND LAKE BEACH, 3- 

bodroom house, fenced-in 
back yard, large deck, 
$69,900. (708) 395^910. 



GET CASH NOWI For Mort- 
giges, Trust Deadi, and 
Land Contracts. FREE qu- 
ote- Private Investor. 
(708)396-0415. 

GRAYSLAKE, LIKE NEW 

Duplex with garage, 3 bed- 
rooms, 2-batha, ak condMon- 
Ing, 5900/monih -futilities 
+$i,ooo security deposit. No 
pelst (708) 587-6503. 

PRIME LAKE ZURICH Loca- 
tion, 4-bedroom colonial on 
wooded lot. $265,500 (708) 
438-3944. 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION 
OF REAL ESTATE 

Merchandise National Bank vs. Ke Hung Kim, et al. 

Case No. 94 CH 626 

On May 9, 1994, certain real estate commonly known as 
2826 Summit Avenue, Highland Park, Illinois 60035- 
1 134, will bo sold at public auction as is to the highest 
and best bidder for cash: 

The property consists of: a single family residence. 

CONTACT: Donald Newman, Plaintiffs attorney, 2 N. 
LaSalle Street, Chicago. Illinois, (312) 641-6693. The 
property will not be open for inspection. The judgment 
amount is $14,603.53. This is a foreclosure of a junior 
mortgage. Pursuant to Section 15-1 507(c) of the Illinois 
Code of Civil Procedure, no information other than the 
information contained in this notice will be provided. 

Forma! Notice of this Judicial Sale of Real Estate will be 
found in the Legal Notices section of this newspaper 
with the above case number. 

SALLY D. COFFELT, CLERK OF THE 

19TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT COURT 

WAUKEGAN, ILLINOIS 




SPRING GROVE 

New all brick 2400 sq, ft. home on 3/4 acre comer lot. 

4 bedrooms, 2 1/2 baths with whirlpool, dining room, 

family room with fireplace, full basement, 3 car garage, 

concrete driveway, paving, brick sidewalk. $209,000. 

Shown By Appointment . 

2307 Elk Dr., Oak Valley Hills 

Spring Grove, IL 

(414)321-8692 



IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT 

FOR THE NORTHERN DISTRICT OF ILLINOIS 

EASTERN DIVISION 

Mldflrat Bank, State Savings Bank 1/k/a 
Mldflrst Savings and Loan Association, 

Plaintiff, Case No. 93 C 5078 



VS. 



Judge Moran 



Jeffrey A. Lasky, State ol Illinois, Genera] 
Motors Acceptance Corporation, Century Park ' 
Condominium Association, Vernon Hills 
Condominium Association, Cynthia S. Engel, 
Fred Engel and Lorraine E. Engel 
Defendants. 
NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE 
QUJUEILEJJQ, Z5S45 
(IT IS ADVISED THAT INTERESTED PARTIES CONSULT THEIR 
OWN ATTORNEYS BEFORE BIDDING AT FORECLOSURE SALES) 

Public Notice la hereby given pursuant to a Judgement 
entered In the above entitled causa on December 2, 1993. 

I, Max Tyson, Special Commissioner (or this court will on 
March 25, 1 §94 at the hour ot 9:00 a.m. at the front door ol Lake 
County Courtbouse-Waukegan, Illinois, sell to the highest bidder 
for cash, the following described premises: 

20 Echo Court #3, Vernon Hills, IL 60061 

The Improvements on the property consist of condominium, 
brick constructed, three story dwelling. 

Sale Terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 
24 hours, certified funds. No refunds. The sale shall be subject 
to general taxes and to special assessments. 

The property will NOT be open for Inspection 

The judgement amount was $64,670.96. 

Upon the sale being made the purchaser will receive a 
Certificate of Sate which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed on a 
specified date unless the property Is redeemed according to law. 

For Information call the Sales Ofllcer at Plaintiff's Attorney, 
Fisher and Fisher, 30 North LaSalle, Chicago, Illinois. (312) 372 
4784 from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Under Illinois law, the Sales 
Ofllcer is DOlrecjulred to provide additional Information other than 
that set forth In this notice. 



Alt real estate advertising in 
this newspaper is subject to 
the Fair Housing Act ol 1968 
which makes it illegal to 
advertise any preference, 
limitation or discrimination 
based on race, color, 
religion, sex, handicap, 
familial status or national 
origin, or an intention to 
make any such preference, 
Imitation or dscwrtinabon. 



IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT 
FOR THE NORTHERN DISTRICT OF ILLINOIS ' 
EASTERN DIVISION 

Federal National Mortgage Association, 

Plaintiff, Case No. S3 C 5079 

VS. Judge Andersen 

Kenneth J. Blackman and Sandra A. 
Blackman, Scott Blackman, Harris Bank 
Barrington, N A and Rumpf Improvement 
Association o/k/a West Shoreland Corporation 

Defendants. 
NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE 
our file no. assaa 

(IT IS ADVISED THAT INTERESTED PARTIES CONSULT THEIR 
OWN ATTORNEYS BEFORE BIDDING AT FORECLOSURE SALES) 

Public Notice Is hereby given pursuant to a Judgement 
entered In the above entitled cause on January 6, 1994. 

I, Audrey Natcone, Special Commissioner for this court will on 
April 8, 1994 at the hour of 8:30 am at the front door of Lake 
County Courthouse, 18 N. County. Waukegan, Illinois, sell to the 
highest bidder for cash, tho following described premises: 
■ . ■? 26839 N. Highway 83, Mundeleln, IL 60060. , 

The improvements on the property consist of single family, 
wood frame, one and a half stories with a separate garage. 

Sale Terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 
hours, certified funds. No refunds. The sale shall be subject to 
general taxes and to special assessments. 

The property will NOT be open for Inspection. 

The judgment amount was $100,661.73. 

Upon the sale being made the purchaser will receive a 
Certificate of Sate which will entitle the purchaser to a Dead on a 
specified date unless the property Is redeemed according to law. 

For Information call the Sales Officer at Plaintiffs Attorney, 
Fisher and Fisher, 30 North LaSalle, Chicago, Illinois. (312) 372' 
4784 from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 pjm. Under Illinois law, the Sales 
Officer Is noj required to provide additional Information other than 
that set forth In this Notice. 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION 

OF REAL ESTATE 

Superior Bank FSB et. al. 

VS 

Lasalle National Bank 

as Trustee et. al. 

Cause No. 90 CH 745 

On March 21, 1994, certain Real Estate 
Commonly Known as 1200 Kenosha Road, Zion, 
IL 60099 will be sold at a Public Auction as to the 
highest and best bidder for cash; 

The property consists of vacant property. 

Contact Attorney Phillip Rosenthal, 7337 N. 
Lincoln Ave., Suite 290, Lincolnwood, Illinois 
60646 (708)677-5100. This property is not open 
for Inspection. 

The foreclosure Judgement is In the amount of 
$1,420,399.80. 

Pursuant to Section 15-1 507(c) of the Illinois 
Code of Civil Procedure, no information other than 
the information contained in this notice will be pro- 
vided. 

Formal Notice of this Judicial Sale of Real 

Estate will be found in the Legal Notices Section of 

this newspaper with the above cause number 

SALLY D. COFFELT, CLERK OF THE 

19TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT COURT 

WAUKEGAN, ILLINOIS 




overall auyistoNS: ts-tr x tav 
UVMCManiquamiMi 

OUlAflE; W tquax Kcl 



TRALEE 



The Tralee b a small single-level home, that doesn't feel the least bit cramped Inside. Halt-circle 
trim nestloa under front-facing gables. Pailadlan-styte garage door windows echo (Ms eye-catching 
ctelaU. This single-level plan Is well-suited to the needs of singles, empty nesters and families with 
young children. 

The (rent porch Isn't large, but If you tike porch swings, there's room for one. Passing through the 
front door, you enter a huge room with a high vaulted celling. Entry, Irving room, dining room and 
kitchen flow together and the entire apace Is richly Illuminated. 

In the living room, wide expanses of glass offer views In three directions. Windows flank a brick 
or llle-heatihed fireplace creating a bright, attractive environment no matter what the time ol year. 
Facing the front, a wide muttkiuned window provides a view of the street. At the rear, another large 
window lets you gaze across tie deck to the rear yard. 

In the kitchen, an L-shaped Island adds cupboard and counter space while doubling as an eating 
bar. Counter space b generous enough for two or more cooks to work together. The dishwasher Is 
rabed to ease back strain. A garden window In Iront of the sink provides yet another view ol the back 
yard. 

Pantry and linen closet are large lor a home thb size. The walk-in pantry has face-frame doors 
for easy access to frequently used items. 

Soma people like their washer and dryer near the kitchen while others prefer It close to the bed- 
rooms. Both tactions get what they want In this plan. Outfitted wtth cabinets, counters, a foW -down 
Ironing board and a deep sink, the utility room Is directly accessbto from the garage as wel. 
Basement stairs and a long work bench are in the garage. 

Luxuries In the vaulted master suite include a walk-in closet, an extended vanity with two basins. 
and a separately enclosed toilet and shower. 

For a study kit ol the TRALEE (333-290), sand $9.00, to Landmark Designs, P.O. Box 2307 
LP60, Eugene, OR 97402 (Be sure to specify plan name & number). For a collection of plan books 
featuring Landmarks moat popular home plans, send $20 to Landmark. 



I 



*\ 



■<!-....' , 

IS -tW;, 





March 11,1994 UkctANd Newspapers CLASSIFIED 





504 



Homes For Rail 



BY OWNER 

4-bodrooms, 
aero. Now 
deck, near 
Oak Grove 
vlllo high school. 
Leavo messago 



LIBERTYVILLE- 

2- bath 3, on 1/2 

kitchen, huge 

forost preserve, 

school, Liberty- 

$176,000 

OPEN 



HOUSE SUNDAY 1-Spm 
1S396 Clovir Lar». 

BY OWNER- WINTHROP 
HARBOR- 4-bodroom 2-1/2 
car garago, attached la-Law 
apartment, hot tub, 1-acro 
lot, fenced-in backyard. 
House can be viewed at any- 
time. Just call (708) 
872-B945. $150,500. 

NEW EVERYTHING. BY 
Owner. 2-1 /2yr otd Raised 
Ranch, '3-bedroom, 2-car ga- 
rage, $124,900. Corner of 
Grass Lake Rd. and Forest. 
(70UJ 073-1024. OPEN 
HOUSE- SUNDAY 1-4pm. 

NEW HOME- GURNEE 
AREA. 3/4 bedroom, 3/balh, 
3+ car garage, vaulted call- 
ings, fireplace, basement, 
wooded lot. $189,900. Will 
Build to' Suit. (708) 
540-0788. ' 

OPEN HOUSE March SJ. 6 
and 12 4 13, 1-4pm, 131 
Knlghtsbrldga Dr., Cam- 
bridge West Develop- 
ment, Mundelsln. 2-story. 
Large eat-In kitchen, 1 5baths, 
3-bedroom, large family room 
with fireplace, dining room, liv- 
ing room. 2-car garage. 
Hawthorn schools and Uberty- 
ville High School. Cafl Tom 
(708)816-1127. 

SAVE $1,000's I LAKE VIL- 
LA. •■ Stunning new home. 
Price reduced! Job Transfer. 
3-bedroom, 2.5bath, vaulted 
ceilings, basement, much 
more. OPEN HOUSE SAT. 
MARCH 12th, SUN. MARCH 
j13th, ,10ahV4pm. For direc- 
tions call (708) 356-8006. 

SILVER LAKE- BY OWNER. 

1 ,500sq,f 1 . 3-bedroom 

LSbaih, double lot, 1-car at- 
tached garage. $80,900. 
(414) 889-4268. 

GARDEN HOME, 2 bed- 
room, 3rd possible, kitchen 
and bath redone, full fin- 
ished basement. A/c, slider 
to deck and pool, 2.5car ga- 
rage, totally updated electric. 
$89,000. (708)336-9558. 

SPRING GROVE TRI-LEV- 
EL. Buy before brokerage 
fees are addedl This 4-bed- 
room, 2-balh home Is priced 
to sell. 2-car attached ga- 
rage Is a real plus. $119,900' 
(708) 567-9327, Owner Is li- 
censed real estate broker. 

SPRING GROVE- COLONI- 
AL 4-bedroom 2.5bath. At- 
tached garage, 1st floor 
laundry room, stone fire- 
place, Oak trim, centra) air, 
large cedar deck. On beauti- 
ful landscaped 1/acre. Brok- 
ers O.K. $179,900 (615) 
675-6594. 

THINK SPRING! 3-bedroom, 
l.5bath, waterfront house 
with designer upgrades, In- 
cluding pool and fireplace. 
(or will decorate to suit) 
* 147,500 (708) 587-0085. 

WAUCONDA- NEW 2-BED- 
ROOM, I.Sbalh house tor 
Sale or Lease. Full base- 
ment, central air, attached 
garage. Choice location. 
(708) 526-2457. 



WHEN YOU 
SEE THIS. 

| Spacious deck overlook-! 
|lng this quiet fenced back| 
•yard you'll fall in love wilh, 
I this 3-bedroom ranch, I 
(attached garage, bathi 
•and a half, sunken living' 
Iroom in ■■ one of Foxl 
[Lake's nlcost neighbor- 
[hoods $114,900. 

RE/MAX 
ADVANTAGE 

Michael Lescher 

"Your Link to the Chain" 
708-395-3000 



LAKE GENEVA- RETIRING- 
MUST SELL1I 2-bodroom, 
I.Sbalh, l/tpOaqJI.' Condo. 
All appliances, fireplace, 
pool, garago. Quiet wooded 
area. .. Walk to town. 
$110,000. (414) 246-4731, 
leave message. 
LINOENHURST- BY OWN- 
ER. 4-bedroom raised ranch, 
large family room, den,' 
1-3/4 bath, laundry room. 
Cathedral callings In foyer, liv- 
ing room and dining room.. 
Central air,- (8)celllng fans, 
stove, micro- wave, dishwash- 
er. Freshly painted, move-In 
condition. . Large beautifuty. 
landscaped corner lot, 
fenced backyard, wtth deck, 
2.5 car garage. Near park. 
Great schools. A lot of TLC. 
$159,600 Lakewofid Subdr/V 
slon. (708) 3S6-8ig9. ,__. 

MCHENRY- 3 BEDROOM 
Ranch, full basement, 2-car 
garage, deck, fe need-yard, 
freshly decorated, new car- 
pet. $102,900. (708) 
705-8972. 



McHENRY- RAISED RANCH. 
2-bodroom wtth lower level 
possibilities! 2-car garage, 
fireplace, deck, energy effle- 
clent. Many upgrades! River 
rights. DEAL DIRECT With 
BUILDER, $129,900. (708) 
526-8306. ■ 

By owner- BEAUTIFUL 3- 
bedroom 2.5bath home. 
Vaulted celling, central 
air/heat, large family room, 
2,Scar garago. Celling fans, 
fireplace.. 5/appllances In- 
cluded. Many upgrades. 
Beach rights. $172,000. Van 
Woods Subd. Twin Lakes. 
(414)877-4240. 



504 



Homes For Rent 



2-bedroom Naw Home. 813 
Portens Rd„ McHenry. 
1-1/2mlles southwest, of Is- 
land Lake water-tower. 
$700/monlh. Country Living 
near Fox River, (708) 
516-«951. 



S-BEDROOM 1.6 BATH full 
basement, ' shed, carpel 
throughout, new appliances, 
Grayslake school . district. 
$850/month 4security. No 
pets. (708) 546-3720. 

CUTE 2-BEDROOM HOUSE, 

1.5 car garage, Round Lake 
Beach, $685/morith. (708) 
973-0832. 

CUTE REMODELED, ZION, 
SMALL 2-bodroom, applianc- 
es, mlnules from Base. 
$575/month. (708) 

672-0200. __^ 

FOX LAKE- 2-BEDROOM 2- 
bath, living room dining area, 
No yard. $600/month. 1yr. 
lease. (708) 567-2622. 

GRAYSLAKE AND AVON 
SCHOOL DIST. 4-bedroom, 
2-balh home wtth 2-car ga- 
rage, newly redecorated. 
$885/moritrV +$1,000 securi- 
ty deposit. References • re- 
quired.- 515 Heather Terr. 
(708)680-0211. 

GURNEE- 4-BEDROOM 

2.5BATH, full basement, 3- 
car garage. Brand New con- 
struction in Ravlnla Woods. 2- 
story foyer, huge master bed- 
room and bath. Long term 
lease available. April 1st. 
$1,650/monlh (708) 

634-6311, evenings and wee- 
kends. 



imtricah Orean^ 




Gttforctdiirhtat 

Ptschtrw Inmihrttd meal dad ermines door 
TMnnsl wood MnonM wfi msintinanoi irea 
exterior dad wrappings. 



TO OVER 90,000 
FAMILIES 



Prioi doss not Inckjdf pwrnlk, sunny sad snoj^ 
ntarinQ btdtarfng ttwer and water or ttpu? 
and wsfl, outvMtt, dtwewtyi, vadtt, hndKap* 
fng or fnindng (Thee* and other m Inonmr 
msnts avakbh. Lower tomk on BUtvet* ind 
TiHw«bratlnahid). 



COUNTY LINE BUILDERS 

21 6 Janet Drive Island lake 
708-5264306 



TRIPLE "fl" BUILDERS 

34390 N. Rle. 45 Lake Villa 
708-223-7900 



504 



Homes For lot 



GURNEE DUPLEX- 1-bed- 
room $550. 2-bedroom 
$775/ month. 3-bedroom 
CS7fi/Month. Some Include 
bawnenls and garage. NO 
sociion 8. NO pets. (708) 
623-7519. 

LONG LAKE/ 1NGLESIDE 
WATERFRONT 2-bedroom 
house. Eat-In kitchen, porch, 
deck, dock, basemont. 
$695/monlh ^utilities. (708) 
945-3442 or (708)480-5760. 

Mc- HENRY/ LAKEMOOR- 
Ront/Buy Option. 4-bad- 
room, 2-bath, Raised 
Ranch. 2-car garage, deck, 
energy efficient, carpeted. 
No pet a. DEAL DIRECT wtth 
BUILDER $1,275/monlh. 
For Details call (708) 
S26-8306. .. . 

ROUND -LAKE BEACH, 3- 

bedroom ranch. All applianc- 
es. SBOO/monlh -futilities. 
FREE COLOR TV wilh 1yr. 
lease. (70S) 949-7100, Jen- 
nifer. ' 




STOP FORECLOSURE- ARE 
YOU FACING BANKRUPT- 
CY- DIVORCE- PROBATE- 
UNEMPLOYMENT. We Buy 
Houses. We Loan Monay. 
All Cash or Terms. Fast 
Settlement. Scott: (708) 
945-8235. 



514 



CondaTown Homes 



ANTtOCH- 3-bedroom town- 
house, 1.5 bath, full base- 
ment, ulittles not Included. 
No pets. $675/month. (414) 
662-2712, atter 6pm. 

FOX LAKE- ON Plstakee 
Lake. 2-bedroom, 2.5bath 
townhome. Fireplace, centra] 
air, 'ceiling tans, all applianc- 
es, security alarm system, at- 
tached garage with opener. 
Boat slip. $155,000. (70S) 

796-3144. 

■ 

GRAYSLAKE- QUAIL 

CREEK TOWNHOME. 2-bed- 
room, finished basement, 
. 1 ,5fcaih, excellent condition. 
$84,900. AH clubhouse facHr- 
ty. By appointment only 
(708) 223-1975. ; 

ISLAND LAKE TOWNHOME 

4yrs. new. 2-bedroom, 1- 
baih, 1-car garage, front 
room, master bedroom with 
cathedra] ceilings, skylight In 
bath, central air, all applianc- 
es stay. Ready to move Inlol 
$85,000 By appointment. 
(706)289-0721. 

LAKE ZURICH- LARGE brick 
lownhouse, 3-bedroom, 

3.5bath, living room, dining 
room, full finished basement 
wilh wet-bar. Clubhouse and 
pool. $155,900 (708) 
436-8210. 

------------al^MIJiaa>-----WVa^il^il^il^il^MMalaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaM 

TOWNHOME IN FOX LAKE 
2-bedroom with den, 
Ijbath, Tri-level, recently re- 
flnished. Good for Investor or 
first time buyer. $59,900 
(708) 973-2329, after 7pm. 

TOWNHOUSE FOR SALE- 

Round Lake Beach, 3-bed- 
rooms, 1-5 car garage. 
$82,000 (708) 526-2527. 



514 



Condo/Town 
Homes 



WAUCONDA CONDO BY 
OWNER, End unit, 2-bed- 
room, 2-balh, laundry room. 
1/car garage, fresh paint, 
constructed In 1992. 
(708)487-1647. 



OWNER FINANCING 

Wauconda Inkofront condo 
Immaculate 2 bd, 2 bth end 
unit w/2 balconies & fireplace. 
Pool, beach & more. S 99, 600. 

Call C-21 
K»lth Schauar 
708-381-9100 



518 



Mobile Homes 



14x60 2 -bedroom, front 
kitchen, shingled and vlnyled 
2-6 walls. Stove, refrigerator, 
centra! air, washer, dryer, all 
2yrs. New! Set In small park 
rent- $220/month Ready to 
move . Inlol $l7,900/own 
(706) 662-1965. 

3-BEDROOM 1. Snaths. All 

appliances Included, (like 
new) Carport, shed, window 
air conditioner, ceiilng fans, 
water softener, quiet Wan-en 
Township neighborhood. 
$12,500(708)263-8186. 

GREAT GETAWAY- 14x70 
Modular home, newly remo- 
deled, 2-bedroom wilh fire- 
place; patio doors to large 
front deck, large driveway, 5- 
mlnutes from Lake Geneva. 
Asking $22,000/best offer 
(414)249-1129. 

Baaaa^i^Hi^i^HiMiMiBVii^Ba^BBaaBaaaaaaBiiiaaHBH^BBi 

MOBILE HOMES- SINGLE 
and Doubles. 2-3 bedrooms. 
Lake County and Kenosha 
County. Bank loans and ap- 
praisals., (7 0B> 662-1965. 

MOBILE HOME: 12x60, 2- 
bedrooms, I.Sbalh, vaulted 
living room, bull-In china cab- 
inet, bay window, celling Ian, 
central air, wood cabinets, 
quality carpeting, appliances 
indudeing washer and dryer. 
$9,900 (706) 590-5412. 



SPRING USTINGS AT 
PIONEER ESTATES 

1991 SKYLINE Country 
kitchen with BAY window. 
Central Air, 2/2, Well main- 
tained, on beautiful outside lot. 
$31,800. . 

1991 SKYLINE 16x80 3/2 
with Central Air. Shed, appti 
ances, Very Clean. Mid 30's. 

1990 ROLLOMOME 16x80 
3/2. Jim Listed! Home vacant, 
owner MUST SELL. Many 
quality features. Newly painted 
and ready for occupancy, 
Central Air and Shed. Call for 
details! $36,500. 

1990 ROLLOIIOME DOU- 
BLE WIDE!! Spacious 3/2 with 
attached 2 Car OARAGE 
Thermopanc windows. Stereo 
system and appliances. LOW 
TAXES $52,500. 

EASY FINANCING. 
CALL TODAY! 

PIONEER 
ESTATES 

Lake Geneva, VVI 

414-248-3831 



518 



Mobile Homes 



MOBILE HOME, 2 bed- 
rooms. Senior Citizen Park. 
Call (414)694-2428. For Infor- 
mation. 

«j1/ \j/ %j> »Jj \j>*JL/*il/ \jy Klf \1* \lf si* 

| USED- * 

*mobile homes* 

* FOR SALE * 

iff: Call for telection # 

% 414457-2891 | 

* Rainbow Lake -* 
% Manor * 

^^ ^Y*^f*^^ ^^* ^^ *^^ ^T* ^^* *^^ ^^ ^P 



HURRY IN 

OR YOU'LL 

MISS OUT 

Our Final Phue HI ii filling 
fast. Slop in and choose your 
NEW HOME white selection 
is best. Many 'models, all 
sizes! I Enjoy AFFORDABLE, 
ECONOMICAL living in Lake 
Geneva's Finest Community, 

Pioneer 
Estates 

(414) 248-3831 

2 mi, south ofLk. Geneva 
on 1 1 wy II 



520 



Apartments For Rent 



TWIN LAKES AREA, by own- 
er, 3-bedroom Cape Cod on 
1/2-acre. 2-story foyer, huge 
kitchen, 1st floor laundry, 
screened porch, country set- 
ling with good schools and 
easy commute. $155,700 
(414) 537-4725. 

YOU CAN OWN YOUR OWN 
HOME! No Oownpayment 
on MILES materials, attrac- 
tive, construction financing. 
Call MILES Homes today 
1/800-343-2684.6x1.1. 

WINTHROP HARBOR- 3 
BEDROOM, 1-baih, 1.5 car 
garage,' partial basement, ex- 
client area. Great for raising 
children. VA assumable. 
Cheaper than Rent! 222 Col- 
lege Ave. $71,500. (706) 
872-0925. 

WOODSTOCK BY OWNER- 

3-4 bedroom ranch boasts 
'"need yard, large deck, fin- 
ished basement with bar 
ana study. Close to schools. 
$110,000. (815) 338-8213. 

GURNEE- SUNDAY 1-4pm 
$108,900. 18575 W. Wood- 
land Terrace. 3-badroOi.i 
Ranch, remodoled Mtciian, 
I.Sbalh, wooded fenced cut- 
du-sac yard. (708) 
356-6564. 



APARTMENT COMPLEX 
MANAGER- To live-In and 
maintain building. Must be 
personable, articulate and re- 
sponsible with people and 
technical skills. Couple pre- 
ferred. Call (706)615-9717, 
' (815)385-1155. 

FOR RENT- SMALL 1 -bed- 
room apartment, upstairs 
unit, partially furnished, 
570/week. 1-1/2 mites south- 
west of Island Lake water 
tower. (708) 516-9951. 

FOX LAKE, VERY large 2- 

bedroom Apartment, well- 
managed, Laundry facility, 
heat included, $595/month. 
(708)973-1830. 

HARVARD AREA- APART- 
MENT COMPLEX MANAG- 
ER- To Mvo-ln and maintain 
building. Musi be honest, 
personable, articulate and re- 
sponsfcle. People and tech- 
nical skits necessary. Couple 
preferred. Call (815) 
36S-1155. ' 

ISLAND LAKE- 2-BED- 
ROOM, 2-bath apartments. 
Large eat- in kitchen. Starting 
al $625/month (708) 
304-6786. . 

LAKE BLUFF- 1AND 2-bed- 
room apartments. Pool, rec 
room. $540-$660/month. in- 
cludes heat. (708) 615-9717. 

LAKE BLUFF AREA- 2-bed- 
room apartment In security 
building, off street parking, 
storage. $525/monlh. (708) 
669-0557. 

LAKE BLUFF- AVAILABLE 

3/1. 1 -bedroom overlooking 
pool, 5610/month; Includes 
heat. Very quiet property In 
woods, with pool. (708) 
577-3636. 



LAKELAND MORTGAGE MARKET 



(A Service Of Mortgage Market Information Services And Lakeland Newspapers) 

MORTGAGE HOTLINE FOR DAILY MORTGAGE NEWS. UPDATES AND TODAY'S MOST COMPETITIVE RATES 976-8500 i75c/mtn.i 



1-800-MMIS-LOAN 

I ■ B ■ 6 6 4-7362 

NATIONAL CONSUMER 
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Rates By Fax 515-5626 
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lo chanoe without rwlcn Survey Dolo: ^7/94 lnlo7mation Indopordanlry compitad by Morisaija Markal Inlormalion Services, not attainted wilh any financial Irtttftutol 07 isal oitale group, and Is believed lo be accu- 
rale but not watranled. G70-B500 »eventy-rrv« cents per minute C Copyright 19B7, 1S68. 1889, 1900. 1991. 1992. >933, 1094. LENDERS CALL ROBIN FOR INFORMATION 708-834-7555. 



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CLASSIFIED L\I<eIancI Newspapers Maich 11,1 994 




«..** 






<-i 



518 



Mobile Homes 



520 



Apartments 
For Rent 



STUDIO APARTMENT- FOX 
Lake, $400/month. Swim- 
mlng, golf, tennis, 24hr. se- 
curity. For appointment call 
Jim (708) 973-1454. -_ 

UNION GROVE, Wl. 2-bod- 
room apartments. FREE 
heat. New carpet. Celling 
Fan. Mini blinds. Close to 
schools. No pets. From 
$490/month. (414) 
878-^809. 

WAUCONOA- 1-Badroom 
apartment on Bangs Lake, 
sand beach, pier and boat 
slip, NO pets. Private en- 
trance and parking, 
5650/month. (70S) 
487-6161. 

WAUKEGAN- 142 BED- 
ROOM aparlments. Victorian 
selling, good location, Avail- 
able now $435-$600/morrth 
(706) 336-0144, 

WAUKEGAN- MODERN 1- 
BEDROOM In quiet well- 
managed security building. 
$425/month. (708)623- 

9850, or (708)615-9717. 

WINTHROP HARBOR, (1)2- 
BEDROOM. Beautifully main- 
tained brick building. 
1-1 /2b locks west of Sheri- 
dan Rd. 3550/month. (1)1- 
bsdroom, all utlllilos paid, 
$450/month. (70S) 

731-3597. 

ZION, 2-BEDROOM ALL 

brick building, clean, new 
paint laundry In building. 
5550/monlh +securlty. 

(708)731-3597. 

ZION- SPACIOUS 1-BED- 
ROOM aparlments available 
now. Laundry, off-street park- 
ing, $425/monih Includes 
heat. (708)615-9717. 



Ingleside 

$499.00 

pays 1st mo. rent + deposit 
on One Bedroom 

•FREE Heat 

Lakeview 

Apartments 

708-587-9277 

'qualified applicants, f yr. lease 



LARGE 2-BEDROOM 

APARTMENT, all new ap- 
pliances, central air, garage 
available. On beautiful 2/acr- 
03 In rural Round Lake. 
s $675/rnon1h _+securtty and 
mutinies. Security and roler- 
ence3. (708) 546-0531. 

NIPPERSINK LAKEFRONT. 
HOUSE-LIKE apartment, 
available April 15. Small neu- 
tered pets OKI $62S/month 
Includes heat. (708) 
587-1615. 

NORTH CHICAGO- LOWER 
level elfleclency, furnished. 
Utilities paid. SlOO/woek or 
$400/month. Dttuxe1-bed- 
room, stove, refrigerator, car- 
pet furnished. Utilities paid. 
5540/month 1710 Lincoln. 
ALSO Rooms for rent. $75- 
S90toeek. (708) 578-971 1 . 

LAKE VIEW TERRACE 

APARTMENTS. Large 1+2- 
bedroom apartments. Lake 
Villa. $525 and $650/month. 
Heat water, air Included. 
(708)356-5474. 

2-badroom UPPER flat. Utili- 
ties, cable/Showtime. On 
20/acras overlooking Water. 
S 525 /month ^security (414) 
889-8400. 

BASEMENT APARTMENT- 
SHARE bath. On 20/acres. 
Utilities Included. Ca- 
ble/Showtime $240. Security 
+reterences. (414) 

889-8400. 

if LUXURY £ 

3 LAKESIDE J 
% APARTMENTS & 

^ . 'Mlcrowaw Ovens %.• 

J •Dishwashers ^/ 

K 'Washers & Dry en ■£ 

Jt •Vaulted Celllngt * 

/jv -Patios or Balconies /£ 

v* •Convenient Lccalbn 
% (708)3564600 

3f 705 Waters E<fg8 Dr. 

> Lake Villi, IL 

On Route 132 (Grand 
Ave.JJuitBjtstof 

Route S3 it the toutfi 
sldo of Deep Lake 



4» mtmgtdby 9 

/ <CS MiMgwMnl / 

f V«e*Ec&e| 







Saving Big at 

Deep Lake Hermitage J 



* 
•> 

* 



ff eMte m t&2 Mm fta, mm D**pLsk* 

# Free Gas Heat & Cooking + 

m Wall to Wall Carpeting * Air Conditioning e> 

jkSecurity intercom acceee f> 

^bTennia, Basketball Court, Tot Lot & More * 

149 N. Milwaukee Avi. J 

Lake Villa, IL J 

(70S) 356-2002 1=1 J 




Tis Spring Pickins' 

A JJk here at 
Pebbleshire • Phase I 

Spacious, modern 1 fc\ 2 bdrm apts from $573. 

FREE heat & cooking gas. 

JpLUSH CARPETING -MODERN APPLIANCES 

%LAUNDRY FACILITIES IN EVERY BUILDING 

♦MINUTES FROM HAWTHORNCENTER 

708-367-4504 

695 Westmoreland Dr. 




520 



Apartments 
For Rent 



LAKE VILLA, LARGE 2 bed- 
room apartment, laundry 
facility, beach rights, heat In- 
cluded, $620/month. 
(708)356-9112. 

(1) 2-BEDROOM AND (3) Ef- 
ficiency Apartments In Wtnth* 
rop Harbor. StariHe Apart- 
ments. $100-$175 Weekly 
plus security deposit. 
(700)B72-O469. 

LAKEFRONT APART- 

MENT. Enjoy swimming, 
boating, and fishing In your 
own private studio cottage on 
Long Lake (near Ingleside/ 
Round Lake) Rustic, natural 
stone-mortar fireplace, knotty 
pine Interior, solid oak bar, 
your own sand beachpler, air 
conditioned. FREE wash- 
er/dryer, and all kitchen ap- 
pliances Included. Stunning 
vlewl Ultra private. No pets. 
$500/month (706) 398-5481. 
Available 4/1/94. 



WAUKEGAN 

"MOVE-IN SPECIALS" 

lbdrm. S485-S510 
2 bdrm. from $580 
■1/2 month Free Rent 
•1/2 month Security Deposit 
move* you in I Luge units, all 
appliances. Military clause. 

KEY INVESTMENT 
& MANAGEMENT, INC 

708-260-2900 



WESTWINB 

Village 
Apartments 

12200 Lewis Ave., Zionl 

]l 4 2 bdrm Heal included [ 
[Appliances - Hinds • on-sltej 

Manager - No pets 

\CaU Manager to view at\ 

(708) 731-1804 or 

Bear Property 
Management 

(414) 697.9616 



Water's Edge 

Apartments 

•FREE gas heal, 
cooking & water 

•Spaciously 
designed apis, 

•Picture window 
kitchen with 
coordinating 
appliances 

•Balcony or patio 
•Central air 
•On-site 
management & 
maintenance 

•Security intercom 
access 

•Scenic country 
selling 

•Minutes from 
train, shopping 

For AppL ft Viewing Call 

(708) 587-6888 





528 



Apt/Homes 
To Share 



FEMALE SEEKING RE- 
SPONSIBLE roommate to 
share apartment In Anlloch 
area. (414) 857-2533, leave 
message. 

NONSMOKING ROOM- 

MATE TO SHARE large 3- 
bedroom, 2-bath house win 
attached garage. Family 
room, fireplace, largo yard, 
basement, $400/month In- 
cludes unities. M/F; (708) 
740-3916, 



528 



AptyHomes 
To Share 



ROOMMATE TO SHARE 3- 

bedroom townhouse In Gur- 
neo. 5325/monih Includes 
utiRles. Call Tanla days (708) 
689-9090, 0X1.135, 

WANTED ROOMMATE- 4- 
BEDROOM House, Linden- 
hurst, 2-bath, 2-car garage, 
lake view. Available now. 
(708)356-1815, (708)938- 
0541. OfC. 



530 



Rooms For Renl 



AIR CONDITIONED- LAKE- 
SIDE Private entrance (rom 
only 590/weok. (708) 
358-2747. ' 

FOR MEN ONLYI Room For 
RENTI S350/month. Utilities 
Included. No-drinking or 
drugs. Includes cable. (708) 
473-9396. 

ROOM TO RENT. LAKE 
VILLA HOME, whiter garage 
parking, $400/monlh Non- 
smoker. Laundry available. 
(708) 356-7480. 

SLEEPING ROOM NEAR 
LAKE BLUFF, Llbertyvllle 
area. Furnished and carpet- 
ed. Warm. Private entrance. 
(708) 367-0093, 

UNFURNISHED ROOM tor 
rent, Ingleside area. Phone 
and food not Included. 
5300/monlh. (708) 

546-9244. 



534 



Property For Sale 



LAKE COUNTY 

APARTMENT 

COMPLEX 

Touting 36 units in 2 
buildingi. Most 2 bed- 
room units with balconies 
and palioi, brick construc- 
tion and pitched roofs. 
Well leased with possible 
owner financing lo quali- 
fied buyer. Recently 
appraised at $1,225,000. 
For further information 
please contact 
Ralph DcPasquale 

^- . GIUIBB & 
I \ ELLIS 

BltP 



538 



Business Property 
For Rest 



24x41 BUILDING, Zoned 
commercial. No automo- 
tive. Approx. 1,150aq.n. 
1530 N. Cedar Lake Rd., 
Round Lake Beach. 
(708)5464355 dr (708) 
546-3600. 

ANTIOCH STOREFRONT. 
PRIME Main Street location. 
I.OOOa.f. New carpeting, 
3/separate rooms. 1/2 base- 
ment. $900/month. (708) 
395-3101. (414)662-2321. 

ANTIQUE DEALERS- 1020's 
Victorian Type Farm house, 
recently renovated. 2- 
HaMhre upstairs, use 1st 
lloor as display apace, Route 
173 Wadsworth, 
$1,500/month. Mrs. Kelly. 
(70S) 336-0670. 

ATTENTION CONTRAC- 
TORS: 20,000 sq.fi. Inside 
storage, drvidable. Near Rts.' 
120 and. 12 (Voio). Reason- 
able price. (708)272-0888. 

NEAR WADSWORTH- COM- 
MERCIAL STORAGE BUILD- 
ING. 2,500-5,000sq.t1. 14ft. 
overhead doors, skylights, 
celling tans, many extras. 
Call tor rates & terms tor 
lease. (708) 680-1635. 



538 



Business Property 
For Rent' 



COMMERCIAL BUILDING- 
IN Fox Lake, 100x50tt. wtth 
office and bathroom, 2-serv- 
Ice doors, {2)1611. electric 
overhead garage doors, . 
lenced-ln outside storage 
100x250. 51,700/morth. Util- 
ities included. References re- 
qulrod. (708) 587-6068. 

FOX LAKE OFFICE Rental! 
Center ot Downtown, utilities 
Included. Side off-street park- 
ing. Call (708)823-4485. 



540 



Investment 
Property 



*3 -Gurnec Lots* 

Priced to Sell 568,900. Zoned 
ncsldcntial/Multi-unit or 
commercial potential. Seller 
Super Motivated! 

•Newer Waukegon* 

■1-unit, built In 1908. Great 
rents • separate utilities. 
Coin laundry • beautiful 
park location. 

Cornerstone Realty 

Ask 4 Uremia 
700-072-0998 



560 



Vacant lot/Acreage 



SMCRES, HOME, CONT- 
ENTS and other buildings, 
Cfty water +wel1, on soft. 
highway In Lynn, Arkansas. 
5/mllos south of Lake Cha- 
rles Stale Park, 3/4-mlles 
north . of downtown Lynn. 
$20,000. It Interested write: 
C.Q. Fosco P.O.Box 322, 
Grayslake, IL 60030. 

LAKE GENEVA, HEATHER- 
RIDGE SUBDIVISION. 15 
acre house lots. Beautiful hill- 
top view. Minutes Irom shop- 
ping and city. $44,900/each. 
(312) 327-0993, or 

(312)262-2074. 



Red Carpet 
Welcome Mat Realty 

Lot for Mle, approximiiely 25 
acres near Voio Bog. Plenty of 
lre« and privacy. $1 09,000 

Contact Bob Kula ■ 

Red Carpet 
Welcome Mat Realty 

(708) 395-8600 
(708) 973-1012 




ResorVYaolioo 
Rentals 



SAN DIEGO VACATION 
CONDOMINIUMS Ocean- 
fronl, Panaramlc views, 
beautifully furnished. Great 
location Id attractions, excel- 
lent restaurants and shop- 
ping. Dally, weekly, month- 
ly rates. CAPRI BEACH AC- 
COMODATIONS (800)542- 
2774. 



568 



Out Of Area Propertj 



FRIENDSHIP, WISCONSIN. 
BEAUTIFUL 11.7 acres near 
Wisconsin Dells with Creek 
running thru property. Asking 
$22,800Vbe&l otter (608)339- 
8272, after 5:30pm, 



WA.-45 mln. No. of Portland. 
Low Crime. Peaceful 200' 
waterfront on Columbia River, 
view ol Oregon Mtn's. 
Sportsmans Paradise. 4500 
si. exec home, 3br, 4bths, Ir 
rec rm, 3 car gar., huge shop. 
552SK. Owner 

206-423-5302 



SOUTHEASTERN ALABAMA 
FOR SALE 

18 Hole Golf Course & Country 
Club. 25,000 rounds, 12,000 
so. ft., clubhouse. $1,350,000 
full price for quick sale. 
GREAT PUCE TO RETIRE. 
(404)493-7013 ■ 



568 



Out Of Area 
Property 



GA-Exec. Retreat 

REYNOLDS PLANTATION (On 
Jack Nlcklaus Goll Courao). Groal 
waters, lum, 5br, 3 IflHJMjea* 
(ill vlow ol Lakfl Oconoo. S275K. 

COLDWELL BANKER 

LAKE OCONEE REALTY 

Bob Murray 

1-800-532-7203 



ARKANSAS, HARDY 
OZARK MOUNTAINS 

By ownor. Price roduced on (1) 
acre with Lako Front on Lg. Pvt. 
Lako. Excol llshlng. door/iurkoy 
hunllng. Ulllillos. Rosort & rollro- 
monl area. Pavo Rd. LotB ol 
Exl/asll Area lor private) boat dock. 
VCR Mm lor only serious Inqu!rlo3 
501-758-9 822, Hopkins Roaliy 



ARKANSAS 

42.5 AC Horse/Retirement 
Property In Mena, nat'l forest 
taxes $332. 1 1/2 hra. from 
leading airport, $197,500. 
Bill Larsen, Owner/Agent. 
501/394*7358, Dorothy Allen 
Really 501/646-7315 



OKLAHOMA- 

Lake Tenkiller 

Gorgaous Lake view, 4b r, 3 
i/2bih home, lumlshsd, frplc, 
bsmt, asphalt drive, only 
$159,900. Boat dock avail, 
$22,000, Call Donna, Wright RE 

1-800-364-1016 



GA-Blue Ridge 
Lake's Best View! 

5BR, 4bth. log cedar 3 level home 



w/283' tromaae, 3 car gar., great 
rm sun rm, frplc, patio, skylight, 
exposed beams, ir dock. S375K. 



Owner 615-496-3241 days, 
706-374-2618 eve. 



QA/TENN/NC BORDER- 
MOUNTAIN RANCH 



Horse prop, corp retroat, youth 

mp, high adventure outfittli 
sorvlce. Passive or acirvo panndr 
w/$250K lo invest (Investment 
secured by property). 

706-492-2277 

EAGLE ADVENTURE COMPANY 



IO-Approx. 6000 s.f. 2 story 
colonial 6+ ec, 5br, Sbth, den, 
ram. rm., pool, cabana, lighted 
tennis court, view of mtn's, 
S769K ($1.5 million In Chicago 
mkt). Mary Ellen Tonne 

CENTURY 21 AA REALTORS 
208-376-6065 



OREGON 

Central Coast 80 acre working 
horse & cattle ranch. 2 barns, 
1700s! modern ranch hse, 30 
acre fenced pasture*, 50 acre 
timber, $700K by .owner. 
Plumbing business also avail 

503-336-2204 



OKLAHOMA 

Horseman's Dream. 25 ml. 
No, of Tulsa, OK on 99 acres, 
4200 sq. ft. rock ranch home, 
4br, 4 1/2 bth, swimming pool. 
S395K. Shanklin Farm & 
Ranch Realty, 918-467-3411. 
Call Dick Allen, 312-421-0335. 



MISSOURI 

553.5 Acre* In Iron County (No 
Flooding Harei). Good hunting. 
tfshlng or carte farm wSh tots ot 
eprlngi/craek water, house, 
pondi, barn* & ihed. (Would 
make a groat Corp Retreat). 
$2SQ/acre, By Owner. 

314-598-3382 



OKLAHOMA 

100 ac ranch In the heart of the 
beautiful Klamlchl Mtn. In SE 
Oklahoma. Spaclout 3br. 2bth 
home with fireplace. 36x60fi. barn. 
3 spring fed ponds. Great hunting 
& fishing aval. S225K. 

918/567-2659 



MO.-663 acres, Lincoln Co. 
(Would make a great Corp 
Retreat). $10,000 CRP 
Income per year, great hunt- 
ing, recreation, panoramic 
view. 50 mln. N, of St Louis, 
$650/per ac. CANNON 
REALTY, Tom Anderson. 

314-528-5400 



574 



Hul Estate Wanted 



INVESTOR WANTS TO BUY 

Single Family Homes, any 
condition. <61S) 344-9077, 
(615)344-9650. 



578 



Real Estate Misc. 



WE BUY MORTGAGES AND 
TRUST DEEDS NATION- 
WIDE. OBELISK FUNDING. 
1708)395-1140. 




704 



Recreational 
Vehicles 



1669 COLEMAN, WIL- 
LIAMSBURG Pop-up camp- 
er.- heat, air conditioned, 
awning. Many options, Wetl 
kopt. Asking $4,S00/best 
offer (706) 662-6458, after 
7pm. . 

JAYCO J.CRANE 1988, 
28lnch, 5th wheel. Designer 
series. Excellent condition. 
Loaded, sleeps 6. 
$11,000*691 offer. (708) 
438-2244. 

TRAVEL TRAILER- 1884, 

35ft. air, self contained, 
Loaded. Custom built. War- 
ranty. NEVER USED. Origi- 
nally $18,700 sell: 512,500 
(312) 545-9039 Can Deliver. 



708 



Soowirjobtles/ATVi 



(2)1892 POLARIS SNOW- 
MOBILES, (1)650RXL, 
$4,300. tndy $3,300. Both 
have studs, carbides and 
covers and are garage kept. 
(615) 363-8863. 

(S)SNOWMOBILES FOR 
PARTS- 1977 Excler, 1981 
Llqulfier, 1987 SRV. (815) 
344-0586. 

ARCTIC CAT JAG Z, 1994, 
$3,800. Ask for Nick Alter 
4pm (414) 878-3047. 

POLARIS XLT SNOWMO- 
BILE, 1994. Only 100/miles. 
$5,ooo/best offer (615) 
728-1288. 

POLARIS, 1894 440, 1,600 

miles, excellent condition, 
$3.600 (708) 546-7984. 

POLARIS, 1884 XLT wflh 
decker pipes $4,500/bes1 
offer (708) 526-2099. ■•■■- 

SNOWMOBILE TRAILER- 
SNO-BIRD 2-place trailer, 
3yrs. New, Never used. 
$550/best offer (708) 
526-6157. 

SNOWMOBILE- 1972 RUPP 

Yankee, 25hp runs good, 
$250 Call Tom (708) 
223-6518, eves or (708)831- 
6074, days. 

SNOWMOBILE- 1993 SKI- 
DOO Formula plus 580, 700 
miles, excellent condition, 
studs, pipes, helmet, Jacket, 
cover. $4,300 (708) 
973-0Q33or (708)395-6927. . 

SNOWMOBILE- CHEAP, 
1976 Arctic Cat Jag, 340, 
Runs good, $3007?lrm. (815) 
653-6201. 

SNOWMOBILE- MUST 
SELL) 1992 Wildcat, stud- 
ded track, $4,500. 1891 
PANTERA, $3,500. Low 
miles on both. (708) 
568-6330. . 

SNOWMOBILES- JET SMS 
AND PONTOON Trailers by 
Triton. Beat price*, Dan's 
Surf and Turf H600) 
848-2744. 

SUZUKI 1992 KING Quad 
350 4x4 ATV, 47orlglnal 
miles, like new, asking 
$4,200 win plow. (414)654- 
6269 or (414) 654-3123, 

YAMAHA, 1888 EXCITER, 

5700C, hot grips, cover, low 
miles, $2,400/best (615) 
344-8111. 

YAMAHA- 1993 ATV Blaster 
very good condliloo, 
only$2,250. 1988 Banchee 
$3,000.(414)657-4421. 




31ft. South Hampton Cabfn 
Cruiser Flybrldge. Excellent 
condition. Twin V-6 MerCruts- 
ers. Like new throughout. 
$26,900 (414) 652-2525, 
(414)657-6546. 

BAVLINER, 1889-1/2 21ft. 
with Cuddy. StHI under war- 
ranty. MANY extras, mint 
condition. Asking ? (708) 
437-7040: 

BOAT LIFTS- BY TRITON 
AND SHOREMASTER. All, 
aluminum, canopys, 12 and 
IIOvoR operator. Call now 
for Pre-Season ' Prices. 
DAN'S SURF & TURF. 1-800- 
646-2744. 



*) 



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MamcITII, 1,994 UklANtl Newspapers CLASSIFIED. 





804 


Cars for Sale 



804 



Can For Sale' 



804 



Can For Sale 



BOAT SLIPS AVAILABLE 
WITH ELECTRIC SHORE 
STATION on FOX LAKE. 
CALL <70») 3S6-2747, 

COBALT 1MI. 1979, 305 VB 

228 lip MerCruteer, IBADB E- 
Z Loader trailer, $7.ooo/bost 
offer (815) 653-2812, after 
4pm. 

EXCEL, 1992 20ft. Boat, 

Many extras. (708)639-0301, 
ov&3, (708) 362-051 0.days, 

OPEN BOW 19ft. TRI-HULL 
$1,200; 1087 300-Jet-SW 
$800. (815) 344-0586. 

SEA RAY DAY CRUISER, 
1981 225, 260hp, 10, E-Z 
Loader trailer, Marine radio. 
Exlras. Stored Inside, 
$10,800 (708) 382-7040 or 
(708)934-9292. 

SYLVAN 1988 Pontoon 
boat, 24ft. Seats 12, 55hp 
Suzuki, Bknlni top, accesso- 
ries Included.. Se.ooo^MJst 
offer (708) 526-6157. 

SYLVAN 1981 Pontoon 
boat, 24ft. Seats 12, 55hp 
Suzuki, Btnlmi top, accesso- 
ries included. $6,ooo,t>esi 
offer (708* S?ft-6157. 



GOT A CAMPGROUND 

Membership or Tlmesbare? 
Welt take II America's Lar- 
gest Resale clearinghouse. 
Call Resort Sales Internation- 
al tolfree Hotirw. 1/800-423- 

5967 (24IVS.) 



720 



Sports Equipment 




EXERCISE BIKE, WESLO 

Pursuit with electronic moni- 
tor, Like new,. $100. (708) 
501-3782. 

SAUNA/ MASSAGE RE- 
DUCE STRESS, lose weight 
wlh Appha Health Environ- 
ment Capsule Ultimate In 
body and mind fitness. Port- 
able, Profitable, Affordable. 
FREE color catalog 1/800- 
68CM853. 

SPIRIT FLEX- STEP Ma- 
chine, (Ike new with timer 
and calorie counter, 
$100A>est ofler. Sony color 
remote TV needs work, $50. 
10-galon fish tank, with filer, 
rocks and heater, $75. Cal 
(708)926-9137. 

Smust'seTII 

SSoIoJIdc wild Itq ancJ btmodlyS 
KATMchMtm. New awdirioN,J 
^$700 or btsi olio?. PtRfotaMx5 
^noaiMt; nwckiNt, $25. . • . 8 

i(708) 926-0026$ 



ACCURA INTEGRA 1990. 

Power sun roof, new tires, 
1 /owner. Looks/runs Greall 
$7,000 (708) 546^1557 

BMW 1978 5304, New tires, 
clutch and battery, 
$l,500/best offer. (815) 
385-602S,after5pm. 

BUICK REGAL, 1983, ga- 
rage kept. Excellent condi- 
tion, original 51,000 miles. 
$3,495feest offer. Call af tor 
6pm. (708) 526-5936. 

CADILLAC, 1989 
SEVILLE, power everything, 
cloth top, like new, 
45,000/miles, $13,000 (414) 
657-7883, days or (414)654- 
2016, eves. 

CHEVY S10 TAHOE 1992, 
2.8IHer, V-6, 5-speed, Ratty 
wheels, Black with grey interi- 
or. 24,000/mlles. $8,600 
(708) 888-2296, Mon-Frl. 
2 :30pm- 1 0:30pm. Ask for 
Eric, 

CHEVY, 1978 MONTE CAR- 
LO, Strong running car, new 
battery, ' 305 engine. Some 
rust $soo/t»st offer 
(708)785-0140. 

CHEVY, 1984 CAMARO Z- 
28, 5.0, H.O. Engine, Red, 
automatic, am/lm stereo, se- 
curity systems. Good condi- 
tion, $2,500*e gj offer. Seri- 
ous Inquiries only. (708) 
548-2977. 



CHEVY, 1988 CELEBRITY 
station wagon 6-cytlnder, air, 
high miloago.' Very Clean. 
$3,600 (708) 395-2648. 

CHEVY, CELEBRITY, 1984 

4-door, 2,8 Rtre, V8. Runs ex- 
collent, body good, $1,300 
after 5pm. (708) 587-6079. 

CHRYSLER CLASSIC, 1983, 
Runs good. $400. (708) 
746-7908, after 4pm. 

CHRYSLER, 1984 E-CLASS 
4-cyllnder automatic, $750. 
(815)344-6087. 

DATSUN, 1983 260ZX. Ex- 
cellent condition. Silver/gray 
with T-tops. $4,000A>est off- 
er. (708) 263-9606. 

FOR SALE or TRADE- 1970 

Convert fcle Cadillac deVllle, 
Good condition, new tires, 
new front end, power wind- 
ows, steering, brakes, air. 
$5,2O0/beBt offer.. (708) 
546-7428, after 6pm. Ask 
for Mike. 

FORD, 1978 T-BIRD, Very 
good condition, $650/best 
offer. Looks and runs greall 
(708)973-1831. 

FORD, 1979 THUNDER- 
BIRD, Excellent running, 
many new parts. Asking 
$1,500. Wll negotiate. (708) 
223-8020. 



QEO, 1991 STORM, 5- 
speed, Rod, power steering, 
arn/Tm cassette, 

28,000/mHes. ■ Asking 

$7,000.(708)548-7901. 

HONDA 1985 CRX si. Sun- 
roof, blue, air conditioning, 
Sspeed, reliable, good corKfl- 
Ifon, fun. $2,600. (708) 815- 
1178/0716. . 

HONDA CRX, 1991, low 

miles, 5-speed, tinted wind- 
ows, Remington Low Profile 
tires, Epic chrome wheels 
with locks, chrome wheel- 
welts, pul-oul stereo. Lot ■ of 
Car for the Montyl 
19.200/bosl offer. (708)668- 
2770. Serious inquiries onfy. 

HONDA RED CRX, 1987, au- 
tomatic, air, 74,000/mlles. 
Excellent condition, original 
owner, . $3,800. ' (708) 
223-3420, eves.or (708)578- 
3610, days 



HONDA, 


1986 


CRX, 5- 


speed, 


arn/Tm 


cassette. 


Good 


condition. 


$2300 


(708) 249-2447. 





JEEP, 1983 WAGONEER 
LTD, GREAT CARI Full 
power equipment, automat- 
ic, In-line 6-engine. trailer 
hitch, driven less than 
9,000/miies per year. Brakes 
Indudlng master cylndor ktst 
redone. Many other new 
parts. The NADA says 
$3,800. Priced at $2,900. 
Ask for Chuck, (708)816- 
6900, days, (708) 

680-1657, eves. 



FORD- 1988 THUNDER- 
BIRD, Turbo Coupe, full pow- 
er, 38K, black. $6,500. 
(414)652-1288. 

LINCOLN MARK VI, 1681, 
fully loaded, Arizona car, 
high mileage, very very 
clean. Must seal $2,200. 
After 6pm call (70S) 
636-0009. .. 

MACH Z, 1994, Excellent 
condBlon, studs, cover, very 
low miles. Must sell (815) 
455-9130. 

MAZDA, 1989 626 U air, 
power steering, power lodes 
and windows, 5-speed, 
am/lm cassette. $5,000. 
(708)356-6608. _. 

NISSAN 1987 STANZA. 
1-owner, excellent condi- 
tion. Automatic, low miles, 
service records available, 
new tires. (708) 374-4331. 

NISSAN, 1986 MAXIMA SE, 
5-speed, 2nd owner, 4-door, 
air, sunroof, fully loaded. .Im- 
maculate condition. $4,995. 
(708) 356-7524. 

POLICE CAR- 1983 Dodge 
Diplomat. New complete 
brake system, new muffler, 
Ittle rusl, needs some woric 
Dependable carl $600A>est 
offer. Large steel, top open- 
ing . Ferret/Rabbit CAGE, 
S50*est. (708) 680-0435, 
leave message. 

PROJECT CAR 1978 CUT- 
LASS SUPREME, runs, has 
extra parts. $250. Jeff. (708) 
395-4612. 



PONTIAC 8000 LE, 1988 

station wagon, 9-passenger, 
excellent condition, 

100,000/mlles. $4,000 (708) 
540-8148. 

PONTIAC- 1984 BONNE- 
VILLE 4-door, $1,200 (708) 
740-3508. 



• U.C. Us First* 

We Buy All Makes 

Cars, Trucks, Boats 

RVs and Motorcycles 

Consignments 

Good Credit? Bad Credit? 

Bankruptcy No Problem! 

Buy Here/Pay Here 

•91 Toyota MR2 i $13,499 

'86 VW Seirocco -$4995 

'S3 Cutlass Siorra $12,995 

'90 Geo Storm LSI „„_.$799S 

'88 Cadillac Seville $8995 

'89 Nissan Pickup $5995 

W OWs Custom Cmber -$2995 

*92 VW Ootf OTI ^49995 

•91 Dodge SpIrH $7995 

•92 Jeep Rang tor $11,995 

•91 Ford Probe $8995 

'89 Chevy S10 Pickup ^$5995 
"90 Bonneville SSE „.„$7995 
'89 Volvo 740OL w ^t0,995 
'89 VW Jettl -„. .„$4995 

Marquordt 



On fll. 41-at 

Washington St., East exit . 

Gumee, IL 

• (708) 249-1300* 



Your Tax Burden 



'Ounce of prevention' also works with tax planning 



I'm sure each of -you are familiar wlth^ 
tHat bid adage" "an ounce of pfeveh-' 
tlon Is worth a pound of cure." When It 
comes to our personal health, our 
homes, or our cars, we seem to make a . 
real effort to. keep ahead of the game. 
In talking to many of our customers after 
a tax problem has developed, I sug- 
gest you consider a little preventive 
maintenance for your taxes as well. 
Here are a few suggestions: 

• File receipts and records as soon 
as you get them. This Is particularly Im- 
portant for orie-tlme things such as ad- 
ditional Income and of taxes withheld 
(during the year) on sources such as 
gambling winnings, or backup withhold- 
ing amounts taken from Interest pay- 
ments. 

• Keep a list of your employers during 
the year, and be sure to get a Form W- 
2, "Wage and Tax Statement," from 
each before filling your tax return. Per- 
sons with numerous employers can In- 



advertently exclude an Income source 
oh their returns, which could result In ex- 
pensive penalties and Interest charges. 

• Keep pay stubs. They are Important 
In reconstructing Income and tax with- 
holding if you have a problem getting 
your Form W-2 earnings statement from 
a former employer. 

• When banking for a child or de- 
pendent adult, be sure their social se- 
curity number appears first on the ac- 
count. Otherwise, their Interest Income 
may show on your tax account. 

• Tax records should be kept for at 
least three years after filing a return or 
two years after the tax Is paid, 
whichever Is later. It Is usually a good 
Idea to keep major financial records, 
such as those for the sate or purchase 
of a home. Indefinitely. 

• Keep a copy of your tax return. You 
would be surprised how many people 
forget to keep a copy and need one 



for 'refinancing, applying for educa- 
tional assistance, or other reasons. 

It Is also a smart Idea to plan ahead 
for the coming years. As you gather 
your records, decide how you are go- 
ing to keep them (In envelopes, folders, 
etc.) and set up your system for 1994 at 
the same time. Then, as each record 
comes In during the year, you can file It 
away so next year your taxes will be a 
snap. 

When you finish your tax return, you 
should also take the time to complete a 
new Form W-4, and give It to your em- 
ployer. This Is especially Important If you 
had to pay more than you expected or 
received a larger than expected re- 
fund. By changing your W-4, more taxes 
will be withheld If you owed this year; or 
If you received a huge refund, more 
money will be In your check each pay- 
day. 



If you retire during the year, you may 
need to have withholding taxes taken 
from your pension or to make esti- 
mated tax payments quarterly. We 
don't want to have your retirement 
dampened by a large tax bill. 

If you were eligible for earned In- 
come credit for 1993 and expect to be 
eligible for 1 994 as well, be sure to give 
your employer a Form W-5, "Earned In-, 
come Credit Advance Payment Cer- 
tificate." That way the advanced credit 
can be added to each of your pay 
checks. There Is no need to wait until 
next year to get the money you need 
today. 

Publication 910, "Guide to Free Tax 
Services," provides a list (with descrip- 
tions) of free IRS publications that cov- 
ers many of the above tax matters. To 
get a copy of this or any publication 
and form, call 1-800-829-3676.— by 
MARILYN W. DAY, IRS district direc- 
tor for northern Illinois 




ROBERT K.WEGGE 

Enrolled Agent 

INCOME TAX 
PREPARATION 

Federal & All States 
Electronic Filing 

265 Center St. 
Grayslake, IL 

(708) 223-0777 



MONKAM. O'CONNOR 

CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANT 

708-223-5547 

INDIVIDUAL AND BUSINESS 

INCOME TAXES, ACCOUNTING 

& CONSULTING 

AUFEimLANDCTATCROTNS 
•NOW ATCENTER STREET SQUARE 

GRAND OPENING SPECIAL: 

FREE ELECTRONIC FILING WHEN 
WEPREPARE YOUR RETURN. 



PRIORY 

INCOME TAXI 

SERVICE 

we of ten. 

MIELECTRONIC 
£* TAX FILING 

Individual & Business Returns 
Enrolled lo Practice Before IRS 

FRAN PRIORY 

(708) 395-7444 

404 Lake St, Antioch 




ROBERT H. F 
OGILVIE 

Certified Public Accountant 

INCOME TAX 
PREPARATION 

Federal & All States 

4606 Old Grand Ave. 

Gumee, IL 

j (708) 249-0336 ffll 



ROGER EIDE 

Cert. Public Accountant 

■Income Tax Returns - 
Personal and Business 

•Business & Tax 
Consulting 

•Accounting Service 
Member of AlCPAJSCPA 
200 S. Greenleaf, Suite J 
Gurnee, IL 60031 

(708)336-0121 



a 






ELECTRONIC 
TAX FILING 

A paper check is mailed to your home in 
approx. 3 weeks after filing with 

ANTIOCH INCOME TAX SERVICE 

Direct deposit to checking or savings account 
within 10 to 14 days with federal returns. 

ATS 906 Ma,n street 



•ttfi** 



Antioch (708)395-3131 *»*£ 



neiv 



Robert Ritzwoller 

Certified Public Accountant; 

•Individual 'Small Business 
•IRA's/Annuities 

(708)587-4552 



TAX PREPARERS: 

You can reach a potential 200,000 customers 

by advertising in this weekly feature running 

now through April 9! For information call 

(708)223-8161 

Lakeland Newspapers 




CLASSIFIED UkelANd Newspapers MahcN 11, 1994 




Wmm 



804 



Cars For Sale 



VOLKSWAGON GOLF GTI. 
High miles. $2,000 or boat 
off or. Portable tennis string- 
er. S250. (708) 662-0753. 

VW FOX QL, 1989, burgun- 
dy metallcAan velour Interior, 
air conditioning, 4 speed, 
sunroof, arn/lm/cassette, 
new tires, battery, CV Joints 
& much more, bocfy/mechan* 
leal great shapo $2,800. 
(815)337-2702, John, eves. 



810 



Cuusic/AotiqueCus 



ATTENTION VW BUG 
LOVERS, 1971 semi-custom 
Bug: 1973 stock VW Bug; 1984 
full custom show car. All cam 
priced to sell. Lei's talk. 
(815)344-0626. 

BUICK SKYLARK, 1972, 
350 rocket, 2- do or, sunroof, 
whole or parts. (414) 
657-1582. 

FORD MUSTANG, 1966, 
Coupe. California car. Origi- 
nal 289 automatic. Needs 
paint and minor body repair. 
Drive-train good condition. 
$3,500/best offer (708) 
578-1920, evening hours. 



814 



Service & Parts 



(4)CHROME FIVE-STAR 
PRIME rtrns, 4-lug boll pat- 
tern, universal, Paid $550, 
sell : for 4300. (708) 
546-7518 or pager (708)461- 
5780 ask tor Michelle. 

CHEVY, FORD PICK-UP 
BODIES. Factory new, guar- 
anteed from $1,300. Doors 
from $89.00; Fenders from 
$50.00; Beds from $800; 
Bed-liners $169. BUMP- 
ERS, GRILLS, REPAIR PAN- 
ELS, PAINTS, ABBRA- 
SIVES, WINDSHIELDS, RA- 
DIATORS. Delivery. MARK'S 
21 7-824-61 B4. 



SNOWPLOW LIGHTBAR, 
AMBER, 270 Flashes per 
minute. Federal Brand $95. 
Stobe light. (414) 886-2830. 

TIRES • MAYJR TIRE. New 
& used. Mounts, balancing, re- 
pairs. 400 S. Shertdan Rd„ 
Waukegan. (708) 244*555. 

TRANSMISSIONS- REBUILT 
TRANSMISSIONS, 

12/montti or 12k mile warran- 
ty. Instated wholesale to Ihe 
pubic. Clutches also. Cal for 
quote. (708)623-6665. 



824 


Vans i 



(8) PASSENGER DODGE 
VAN, 1986,. $3,000. 

(615)344-0586. 

CHEVY CARGO VAN, 
1985, 68,000 miles, 1 ton sus- 
pension, all weather radiate, 
running boards, 4 speed stick, 
anVtm stereo A tape, $2,500. 
(708)945-4356. 

FORD 1982 XLT, Window 
van, 351 V-8, automatic, 
heavy tow package, tinted 
pop-outs, new tires, brake 
Job, care, etc. Very mechani- 
cally sound. $2,000/cash. 
(70B) 272-2437. 

FORD 1989 CONVERSION 
VAN. Low miles. $8,300 or 
best offer. Sharp! (708) 546- 
0907. 

FORD • CLUB WAGON, 

XLT- 1987, 351 engine with 
trailer towing package, high 
well malnt. miles, excellent 
condition Inside/out. 56,000. 
(815)385-4224 days, 

(815)385-4541 evenings. 



FORD, 1987 ♦ 88 F-350 
CLUB WAGONS, With 
wheelchair INI in each. ALSO 
3/wheelchalrs and - parts. 
(708)740-4051. 

FORD- 1979 CUBE VAN, 
55,000 original mites, asking 
$4,200. Phone (414)654-5653. 



824 


Vans 



PLYMOUTH VOYAGER 

1987. New rebuilt engine, 
under 500 mites, all electric, 
many extras. A Must Seel 
$6,000 (414) 889-8412, ask 
for Kathy or George. 



828 



Four Whcd Drive 
Jeeps 



4X4 EDDIE BAUER EX- 
PLORER, 1993, 15k, fully 
loaded sunroof, double visors. 
$21 ,800. (708)680-7362. 

FORD 1988 BRONCO II. 

Loaded, Western plow, recent 
transmission and tires. Asking 
$5,500. (708) 223-0675. 

GMC 1993 JIMMY 4X4. 
MINT CONDITION, LOW 
MILEAGE. CALL (815) 943- 
3459. 

SUBARU BRAT, 1986, 61K 

miles, very clean, $2,000 or 
best offer. (414)862-6060. 

TOYOTA 1992 4X4, V-8, 5 
speed, air. $10,500. (414)539- 
2718 after 5:30pm. 



834 


Tiucfcs/Tnilers \ 



GMC 1-TON 1977 pickup, 
Mechanic owned, S950*es1 
Offer. (708) 740-3269. 



834 



Trucks/Trailers 



FORD- 1984 F-150 shortbed 
XLT package, 351m, runs, 
great, must seel Many op- 
tions. $3,000 (708)215- 
8526, leave messa ge. 

GMC, 1-TON 1988 dump 
truck with plow" $8,00u7best 
off or. (708) 526-2099. 

TRUCK -TERRIFIC RUNNER 
(Black Beauty) 1985 GMC 
S15. Like new. New tires, 
sun visor, new paint. 
$2,995/best offer (414) 
857-7777. 

1975 INSLEY H-S60C; 
1977 GMC 6500 5-6 yard 
dump truck; 10-ton Dynawekf 
tag-a-tong trailer; 1982 GMC 
3/4-ton van; 1978 FonJ F-250 
pickup; 1973 Ford F-350 utHh 
ty body truck. (708) 546-1474. 
Mon. thru Fri., 6:30 - 4:30. 

CHEVROLET 1985 SUB- 
URBAN SILVERADO, good 
condtlon. Asking $4,750 or 
best offer. Call Joe at 
(414)694-0406. 

CHEVY SUBURBAN, 1978. 

Good condtlon, 350 wflh aJr, 
Runs good, $1,i50/best off- 

er. (706) 546-6229. 

CHEVY, 1989 1S00 SILVER- 
ADO 4x4 wlh 3-door topper 
and ladder rack. Excellent 
condition, $7,800/best offer. 
After 6pm (708) 740-3305. 



834 



Trucks/Trailers 



CHEVY, 1992 S-10. Garnet 
red, 4,500/mlles, 2.5 5- 
speed, I4lnch aluminum 
slots on front, 15lnch alumi- 
num slots on back. Crager 
center kits, bedllner, 
$8,oooreest. Extras Includ- 
ed. (708) 949-8723, leave 
message on machine. 

CHEVY SUBURBAN, 1983, 
4wd, 5.7L, full power, dual 
air, cruise, till. Clean. 
90K/mllos. Asking $5,500. 
(708) 540-9040. 

DUALLY 1985 FORD Crew' 
Cab, Diesel 70,000/mltes. 
Excellent condition. Perfect 
for towing. $6,850 (414) 
534-2686, eves or wee- 
kends. 

FORD 1993 RANGER 
SPORT Pick-up. New, white 
with liner, power steer- 
ingforakes, aluminum wheels. 
$9,500. FORD 1990 RANGER 
Pick-up. White with Iner, low 
miles. $6.500. (708) 815-1 178. 

FORD, 1986 F-250 Pickup, 
new motor, new complete 
frontend, new brakes, asking 
$3,950. New 4-door toolbox 
cap, also available. $350. 
(708) 438-9275. 

FORD-1992, F-150 Cus- 
tom, automatic, air, 6-cylnder, 
dual tanks, 48,000 miles, 
$10,500. (708)395-1508 after 
4pm. 



838 


Heavy Equipment 



1989 MODEL 200+ Brush 
Bandit Chipper, 116hp, 
Cummlngs dlesel with 
1,400/hOUrs, $8,500. 1989 
Vermeer Model 630B 
Stump ' grinder, 22/hours. 
$8,000. Will sell bolh 
$15,000(708)566-9372. 

BOBCAT- OLDER MODEL 
with bucket and fork. Runs 
Great. 4-cyllnder gas. 
$3,500/cash. (708) 

587-6889. 



844 



Motorcycles 



1989 HARLEY DAVIDSON 
14,700 Original Mites. 
LOWERS. $11,500. Call 
(708) 913-9689, ASK FOR 

PHIL 

MOTORCYCLE FOR SALE- 
1993 Honda Nlghlhawk, 
750CC, wRh windshield. Good 
condition, less than 2,500 
miles. -Asking $3,700 (708) 
740-2989. 

SUZUKI, 1988 SAVAGE, low 
mileage, $2,500/besl offer. 
(414) 889-8412. Ask for 
Kathy or George. - 



848 



Wanted To Buy 



WANTED: CORVETTE 

1968-1988. Any condition., 

Reasonable. Also buying Vette 
parts. (708)265-0455. 



Lakeland Newspapers Is Your 





T & C METAL CO. 

We recycle aluminum cans) 



Wo also buy 
•Copp«r • Brass 

•Aluminum Siding 
•Auto Radiators 



Buyers of non-ferrous metals. 
Industrial accounts welcome. 



•Insulated Wire 
•Lead 'Stainless 
•Batteries »Zinc 
•Catalytic Converters 

378 Prairie St. 
Crystal Lake, IL 



815-459-4445 



Hours: Mon.-Frl. 8-5; Sat. 8-1 



1 Block S. of Hwy. 176 
Behind J & L Gas Station 



r e^3 i 

J Decorating i 

m •Wallpaper Hanging H 
j •Int/Ext Painting I 
J FREE ESTIMATES I 

* All work insured &. I 
n guaranteed I 

2 (815)344-8612 g 



CAKY'S 



Interior and Exterior 
Painting ft Wallcovering 

"For a clean neat >eb 
at the right pricer 

16 YEARS EXPERIENCE 

(708) 587-6211 



Custom Residential Design and Construction 



• Beautiful custom homes of all sizes 

and styles, for all budgets. 
•Designed and built for you, 
•Build NOW, Super-low 

interest rates. 

Call for a Free Design 
Consultation and Estimate 




G- A-B U ILDERS (708)623-1 535 



THE MOST PORTABLE SPAS IN THE WORLD! 

J ^Jfot Uubd \ 
(708)746-6110 

•Softub Goes Anywhere' 

■Easy to Operate 

•Easy to Move at Only 45 lbs. 

•Easy to Care For 

•31 Designer Colore 

•We Service What Wo Soil 

•Polybond Technology Means Durability 

•Family-Owned and Operated 




k© 



Sdkub 

"Tie Spa of Infinite Possibilities" 



LAKE SHORE 
INTERIOR PAINTING 

•Complete Interior & 

Exterior Painting 
•Reasonable Rates 
•Quality Paints 
- •Free Estimates 
•Fully Insured 

20% off thru the Holidays 

"We care for your Property as 
if it were our Own' 

(708) 890-6140 



BIAND HOME SERVICE 

Bathroom Specialists 

Handyman Service 

All Types Flooring - Repairs 

Bath Overhauls - Basements 

"Call Us And Ask" 

ESTIMATES ALWAYS FREE 

(708) 487-4331 



t 




P&D Decorating 

Total Service Company 

Call Dean for 
Professional Estimates 



Unni?' 



■Commercial 
■New Construction 
-Personalized Services 
■Reasonable Rates 
■Fully Insured 



•Residential 
•Excellent References 
•Dry Wall 
•Paper Hanger 
•Full Finishes 



We Do Everything 
Office 526-T4Q9 



HOUSE CALLS 
CLEANING SERVICE 

Too busy, no lime, but still 
need a clean house? 

WE CAN HELP! 

Let us do the work. 

Affordable, efficient home cleaning 

BONDED • INSURED 

FREE ESTIMATES 

(708) 740-9480 




Licensed 

Insured 

FREE 

Estimates 



SIDING & TRIM 

'SEAfcCESS GLITTERS 

WINDOWS- DOORS 

DEGKS ♦ AWNING 

Repair & Insurance Work 



Quality 

Craftsmanship 

Guaranteed 




• 



1 



% 



^1** iN.no ^W 

"fio AJiomn.mi stum, ho mittHG*C*>\ 

BUSINESS PLANS -RESUMES AND MOh\E 
CALL FOB ADDITIONAL SIR VICES OfWEMED 
WE IHE PEOPLE BUSINESS CENTER 
\^ (708) 548-1300 J 



***************** 

* * Hum's Inside Summer I 

* Storaoe Special * * 

J Any size boat trailer -or- * 
2 snowmobiles on trailer J 



p«r month * 

S (708) 587-9100 J 

* Private Affairs Banquet Hall * 

* Located on Long Lake * 

* Parties of 75-200 * 
***************** 



CPA Services 

Preparation of Individual, 
partnership, corporation 
& trust income tax returns 
Small business accounting, 
tax & consulting 

Reasonable rates 

(708)680-2599 



TAX PREPARATION 



Robert Ritzwoller 

Certified Public 
Accountant 

•Individual 
•Small Business 
•IRA's/Annuities 

(708) 587-4552 






"jjT W W ailW t U »» >*«*» ilr mr -vf^* 



5* W0P2M iBfUW+L**!" 



m 



- ...... m . "■•_-.. 



wmmm 






M*«cli 11, 1994 LaIceIanc) Newspapers CLASSIFIED Hfl 



HwatrSM' *?.**-* 



Lakeland Newspapers Is Your 



TO PLACE 

YOUR AD HERE 

CALL 

708-223-8161 



□□S 



-To These Fine Lakeland Area Business & Services 



i , 




THE PAINTERS 



► PROFESSIONAL W<W AT 

REASONABLE PRICES 
•FULLY INSURED 

•ALL MINOR REPAIRS DONE FREE 
•WINTER SPECIALS 
CALL FOR A FREE ESTIMATE! 

tom suba 223-255* 




Project Manager/Estimator. 




E & A HOME 
•ROYEME] 

Kitchens • Baths • Decks 

Room Additions 

\ NO JOB TOO SMALL 

{free estimates! 

(708)526-3976 



*\\m&A, 




English riding lessons 

BRIGHT INDOOR ARENA 

PRIVATE INSTRUCTION 

. GREAT SCHOOL HORSES 

865-O907 









»s 

MAINTENANCE 

No Job Too Small. I'll Do It All, 

•Remodeling 

HitchemJathwom&Hec Rooms 
•Painting And Wallpapering 
•Flooring 

(All Types) 

•Siding And Roofing 
•Carpentry 

Decks & Additions 

Ml Work hq Will Bono 

fill ESTIMATES, CALL 
(414) 537-2439 



(\1T- 



Distinctive 



I NORTH AVE - ANTIOCH, IL 

(708) 395-7217 



R.A.W. Construction 

Specializing in Carpentry 

•New 

Construction 

B. •Remodeling 

» »Homc Repairs 

Free Estimates - 

Insured 

ROY 
708-740-1447 



FKUPYOURHOUSE 



We' II paint rooms, 

build closets, 
shelves or whatever! 



BRIAN'S HOME IMPROVEMENTS 



J708) 816-0190 



Builders 

• Custom Homes 

• Room Additions 

• Quality Remodeling 

PersohalAffenfion To 
Quality Assurance 

Call for a FREE estimate 
(708)215-1934 

Design Services Available 



OPTIMUM 

■Expntln In all wall canrlngt. 

fine Decorative Painting •AAikkolored spray 

• ■ 'Slaining 
•DrywalRapalr 

> teat Serf Wad ion It My Baifows" 



708/263-1504 



FfM «tiimlM*lnuia*Gradua*a d 
U,S.Sehoo) of Prafculonal Paparhan0ng 
1WUUMMII 



bcu 




J 



DONT THROW AWAY 
THAT OLD LAMP, 
BRING IT TO OUR 
LAMP DOCTORS, 
FOR REPAIRS. 



I WARREN ELECTRIC INC. 
I 33261 N. Highway 45 
I Wildwood, IL 60030 
I (708) 223-8691 




HEATING & 
COOLING 

LENNOX 

• HIGH EFFICIENCY FURNACES 
AND BOILER REPLACEMENTS* 

• 10 FT. EFFICIENCY CHECKS * 
•HUMIDIFIERS, AIR CLEANERS* 

•WATER HEATERS* 

(708)526-6286 
(815) 459-2300 



*«u« 



•^ Serving Your Community 
It SALES- SERVICE 

An Independent Lennox Dealer 



For 25 Years 
Locally over 40 years. 



Financing 
Available 



24 Hour 
Service 



FRKKKS II MAILS 

INTkRHtR &7i\l . 1AIKK1DK 
RlAII>l-.NTlAlyfuM.\U.R(L\l-INl)l S1RIAI 

WKI 1 DI-.M A\> hsUMAII.m 1 4 

HAI.VI INC. P\l'h-.R|.\(i .V |1 )W|.R V, .\s|)]\(, 

WK ARK HIM I.NM Kl I).* 1 h !.NnI IK* 

ai i v.i mm is ii 1 1 v i,r \r\.n 1 1 1 D 

»*«■ t'Al I I S |l i|)AV 



Discover 
Renting 

You can do it yourself 
(708) 740-8800 

Round Lake Park 



©IED 
RENTA 



RENTAL r»c. 



fsPORTSrSOAPS! ^SCOPES!! 



I 



^ HEY ( SPORTS FANS! k- | 

Mf T.V. SOAP OPERA LOVERS!! -m i 
ZODIAC STA1GAZERS1H r ^ ' 

I 
I 
I 
I 
I 



DECKS PLUS 

CONSTRUCTION 
GENERAL CARPENTRY 



WHO? WHAT? WHEN? 

where? winr? wmi whom? 

SPORTS NEWS, SCORES. 
' POINT SPREADS, TRIVIA- 
UPDATED EVERY 15 MINUTES 
DAILY SOAP OPERA REPORTS.. ~* 
■ ASTROLOGICAL-HOROSCOPE FORECASTS 
I SPORTS.- SOAPS- CELESTIAL HOTilNE- 
1-900-884-9204 
r£XTENSION«21I2 

SZ99 PER MINUTE 

| 24 HOURS -MUST BE 18 YEARS OLD I 

I PROCALL CO. 1(602)954-7420 j 



■ sports.: 

\0 



■tp\ 



• Custom Decks 'Porches 

• Room Additions • Basement Remodeling 

• Bathrooms - Kitchens • Custom Carpentry 
p] (J f\ * Improvements & Repairs! 




INSURED & BONDED 
FREE ESTIMATES 

(414) 889-8442 

Pleaao Call Gary Kolkau 




sA§trolofff q^eorfings 



Cfcesy^ntey 



insured Tree I Shrub Pruning 
aiul Renio\nl 

Sau'tuur trees bv root feeding 



I7(W)5K7-I)5Xij 20) can Ii xp. 



Mrs. Ashley was born with a Spiritual 
psychic ability to help those who are In 

need of help to restore Love, Health. 
Contentment and Peace of Mind, and 

Can Remove all Unnatural Influences 

that are holding you back from your 
full potential In life. 

Spiritual Psychics 

Specializing In Tarot Card Readings 

Aura & Crystal Rock Readings 

Rt. 60 on Rt. 45 

MUNDELEIN 566-20191 



J DECK SAVERS + J 

jl, Pressure Washing 

Restoration - Staining J 

■ •Decks •Siding *9* 

J •Fences •Docks ^ 

•^ Pressure Treated Wood Is tje 

4P4 Not Weatherproof! jl 

A .INSURED 

J (708)395-8428 T 

************ 

AAilAiAAAIAiAA 

J CW LANDSCAPE CO. INC. J 

A LANDSCAPE DESIGNERS & CONTRACTORS 

* Serving Lafo County Since 1960 

* •Computer Design •Seeding 
4 •Flagstone Patios 'Sodding 
A -Stone Walls 'Planting 

* 'Texture Gardens 'Grading 

a (708) 746-8953 

ttiiitlttllMt 



Piano Tuning 

& Repair 

'30.°° 

Call John 

(708) 548-1403 



A 
A 
A 
A 

A 
A 
A 
A 

A 




fXBL 



CIEAN, FRIENDLY GROWING PUCE, 
GREAT VmWING ROOM. ECO BEDDING. 

WOOD FIBER FOOTING. 

BOARD 0ZZS.B9 
265-0907 




Custom 
^ ; ^Printing 

Camera ready artwork 
B&W and Color - 

One of a kind and small lots. 

Business-Presentation 

Packages, 

Need something special ? 

Gemini Presentations 
708-550-84 14 



COFFEE MUG SPECIAL! 

11 oz. White Porcelain 

with 1-color imprint 

as low as $.99 each. 

Don't miss this special offer! 

[ Call ITEMS and IDEAS at (708) 438-7488 



-S 





iAURSEN & 
'LACKMANQ) 

Window & Door Replacement 

Service You Can Trust 
Free Estimates 

Depend 




(708) 838-5300 



FLOORS U WALK ON, inc. 



Carpeia • Hardwood • Ceramic • Vinyl 
Kitchen A Bathroom Remodeling 

Rmitdmiuimt « CemmarclaJ Imtatiaiitm 

ALLWORK CiUAIUNTC£D 

^Free Estimates 
(708)356.2500 
(708)310-5220 







V 




1 SPORTS UktlANd NwspApERS Mam* 11, 1994 



Boys 

Carmel 57, Lake Forest 61 

Carmcl : Drcnnan 7 1 1-1 18, 
Staslck 3 2-3 10, Trlllo 1 0-0 2, Glazlk 2 
5-6 9, Rose 5 0-0 10, Koscor 2 0-0 4, 
Kent 10-02, Graham 0-0 0, Ditto 0- 
0, Fritsch 1 0-0 2. Totals 22 0-10 57. . 

Lake Forest: Santa 2 10-13, Moss 
4 2-3 12, Strzalka 2-3 2, Hlggins 5 0- 
1 0, Cage 7 6-9 20, Anderson 0-0 0, 
Dassc 0-0 0, Dykstra 10-12, Kopach 
0-0 0. Totals 19 20-29 61. 
Carmel 9 10 6 30 57 

take Forest 15 13 22 11 61 

Round Lake 56, Llbertyvllle 59 

Round Lake: Wilcox 7 5-B 21, 
Knauffi 1-1 14, Bass 1 0-2 3, Swanson 
4 1-2 10, Muclleman 3 2-5 8. Totals 21 
9-18 56. 

Llbertyvllle: Mcldman 10 13-15 



Prep BAskETbAll ResuIts 



37, Lee 2 0-0 5, Devlne 3 0-0 8, Jurccko 
1 1-2 3, Via 1 0-0 2, Calhoun 2 0-0 4. 
Totals 19 14-15 59. 
Round Lake 12 12 13 17 56 
Llbertyvllle 15 5 17 17 59 

3-polnt baskets: Lib. Mcldman 4, 
Devlne 2, Lee. RL Wilcox 2, Knauf, 
Swanson, Bass. Fouled out: RL Zibcll; 
Lib. Via. 

Warhawks 6 1 , Blue Devils 59 
. North Chicago: Varnardo 2 0-0 5, 
Long 7 4-6 19, Whittlnglon 2 0-0 4, 
Llndo 8 2-3 18, Walls 3 3-8 10, McCoy 
11-2 3, Murphy 1 0-0 2. Totals 24 10- 



1961. 

Warren: Woods 5 8-8 19, Bradley 
2 0-0 4, Bongratz 6 3-4 15, McClcndon 
6 0-012, Dangcl 1 4-4 6, Kcl vcr 3-6 3. 
Totals 20 18-2259. 
North Chicago 17 15 7 22 61 
Warren 16 13 17 13 59 

3-polnt goals: Bernardo, Long, 
Walls, Woods. Total team fouls: NC 
19, Warren 16. Fouled out, McCory, 
Bongratz. 

Girls Basketball 
Willlamsvllle 46, Rlchmond-B. 46 

Williamsvlllc: Sommcr 7-10 2-2 



17, Langcban 11-24 2-3 25, Saglc 0-0 
2-4 2, Glossop 0-10-00. DeRosa 0-1 0- 
0, Burgard 2-4 0-0 4. Totals 20-40 6- 
948. 

Richmond-Burton: Clark 0-5 0-0 
0, Regnier 4-8 2-4 10, Bones 2-7 1-2 6, 
McNabb 3-11 0-0 9, Gambit 6-14 2-3 
15, Holian 3-8 0-1 6, Toler 0-0 0-0 0. 
Totals 18-53 5-10 46. 
WIIHaimville 13 15 13 7 48 
Rlchmond-B II U 10 14 46 

3-pointcrs: Williamsvlllc, 2-3 
Sommcr 1-1, Langcban 1-2. 
Richmond-Burton, 5-12, Clark 0-1, 



Bencs- 1-1, McNabb 3-0, Gambit 1-1, 
Holian 0-1. Fouled out— none. 
Rebounds; Willlamsvllle 15, Sommcr 
6. Richmond-Burton .11, Gambit, 
Clark, McNabb 3. Total fouls— 
Will lams villc 11, Richmond -Burton. 
Standings 
(x=scason over). 
Team W L 

Mundcleln 26 1 

Grayslakc 19 6 

Llbertyvllle 18 8 

x-Grant 17 9 

x-Warrcn 14 13 

x-Stevenson 13 13 
x-RoundLake 10 16 
x- Lake Zurich 9 16 
x-Carmel 8 18 

x-Wauconda 8 19 

x-Antioch 5 22 




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After the third weekend of the tournament, 

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George Maki 610 

Handicap .122 

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Ron Axberg ; 685 

Handicap 85 

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John Hrischuk ...'. 585 

Handicap ........: 299 

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Don Hall .....613 

Handicap . 236 

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Handicap ..93 

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2) Rob Cunningham .". .675 

Handicap .67 

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3) Joe Jilpas I ; 599 

Handicap ........127 

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4) John Walczak 663 

Handicap .......62 

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5) Dave Schneider 632 

Handicap.. .......93 

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BillSpignor ...681 

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2) Jaime Rodregrcss 2128 

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5) . Bill Spigncr .I;....".. 2082 

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Muck 11, 1994 UIccUncI Newspapers SPORTS 




Carmel's Stasiek earns all-league 




Dan Stasiek's efforts as Carmcl 
High's leading scorer did not go 
unnoticed by Cast Suburban 
Catholic Conference coaches. 

The Carmcl ; * standout was 
named to the first team all con- 



ference selection, an unanimous 
pick at that. 

"He did a nice job, He led us In 
scoring at 13.8 points a game, and 
was first in deflections which led 
to turnovers," Coach Ben Berg 



said of Stasiek. 

The Corsairs finished the sea- 
son at 8-18 after a gallant come- 
back try fell short against Lake 
Forest. Lake. Forest led by 23 
points after three quarters, but a 



CLC wrestlers plan for future goals 



In some respects, next season 
begins in 10 days for College of 
Lake County wrestling program. 

Coach Stan Paslcwicz is invit- 
ing all those interested in trying 
out for the 1994-95 team to report 
for a 7 p.m. meeting at the physi- 
cal education center. 

"We have a big job ahead of us, 
but I have talked to some solid 
freshmen. The biggest thing is to 
get the commitment from the 
kids/' Pasicwlcz said. 

The 1993-94 season was high- 
lighted with three wrestlers mak- 
ing nationals. Ben Bubcck (190 
pounds); Rick Quiglcy (167) John 
Kcaskowski (134) qualified for the 
NJCCAA in Blsmark, North 
Dakota. All lost in two matches. 

Kcaskowski at 134 came the 
closest to winning, losing 8-7. 



Bubcck finished with a 10-8 
record and was named MVP. 

"Ben was not ready at nation- 
als. He got pinned twice. When 
he controlled the tempo, he 
could beat anybody," Pasicwlcz 
said. 

Overall, the mentor was 
pleased. "Day in and day out, 
everyone gave 100 percent," 
Pasicwlcz said. 

Mike Tomasello, who -will 
attend University of Illinois next 
year, was named most improved. 
The Warren Township High grad- 
uate wrestled at 134 pounds. 

Steve Fuller, from Mundelcin, 
lost many one-point matches at 
142 pounds and just missed a 
spot at nationals. 

Brian Larscn, at 1 18, overcame 



a fractured nose but bounced 
back. 

Overcoming a much more 
serious! injury was George 
Vallach. The 167-pounder has 
one lung. Paslcwicz first knew 
him when he was in eighth grade 
at Highland in Libertyville. 
Vallach later moved to Antioch. 
"He could never get it all togeth- 
er, but he came out this year. He 
never got mad/' Paslcwicz said. 

Kcaskowski, from Round 
Lake, overcame a knee Injury to 
wrestle at 134. 

Qulglcy, co-captain with 
• Bubcck, also never quit and will 

go on to Marquette University. 

He lost his matches at nationals 
, by scores of 16-9 and 19-7. 

CLC was 3-16 in dual meets. 



Carmel rally erased all but 3 of 
those points. Lake Forest held on 
to win 61-57. 

"I was .very pleased. In the 
fourth quarter, we began hitting 
our shots. We were ll-for-39 
from the field in the first three 
quarters," Berg said. 

The comeback hit its high- 
water mark when senior Tom 
Drcnnan canned a three-pointer 
for a 56-53 deficit with 24 seconds 
left 

Drennan's 18 points led 
Carmcl and helped him finish 
with an 8 pblnts-pcr-gamc aver- 
age . Stasiek had 8. . 

"He stepped up when - he 
needed to and scored between 8 
and 12 points a game/' Berg said 
of Drcnnan. 

Berg recognized the contribu- 
tions of center Lanndon Rose, 
who averaged 1 1.8 points a game. 
"He was our leading rcboundcr 
despite being outsized every time 
he stepped on the court," Berg 
said; 

Senior Bob Glazik had not 
seen much playing time before 
this season. "He started in 24 of 



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26 games and had 4 or 5 
rebounds a game," Berg said. ; 

Senior guard Rick Koseor di- 
rected the offense well, Berg said. 

An 8-18 season may not grab 
the banner, headlines, but Berg 
was not disappointed in his first 
campaign. 

"We were very competitive in 
a lot of games and the seniors 
made it more enjoyable," he said. 

Newcomers to watch for CHS 
fans include Mike Gramm, who 
averaged between 18 and 20 
points a game for the sophomore 
team and 6-2 Brad Salata. Juniors 
are led by Matt Trillo and Paul 
Fritsch. 




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I SPORTS LaIceIancI Newspapers MarcIi 11, 1994 



Ladies strike, 

The Lake County Women's 
Bowling Association will be 
concluding Its annual 
Championship 
Tournament March 12 and 
13atRynlshLanesat 
Great Lakes Naval Training 
Center. 

Marlene Newman (left) 
of Ubertyvllle participated 
In the first part of the tour- 
nament March 5 and 6, 
There are 3,050 Lake 
County members of the 
Women's Bowling 

Association.— Photo by 
Gene Gabry 



Mustang 



From Page C32 



drawing a foul and making 
two free throws and drilling a 
three-pointer for a. 65-58 lead 
With 5:01 left. 

From then on, it was a free- 
throw shooting contest plus a few 
Kcssel and Stackhousc lay-ups. 

"I thought we had a good 
game plan. Wc had a couple of 
big buckets wc could not do it. I 
am just proud of the guys. I can't 
single out one guy. It is a great 
season." Groth said. 

Then it was Kcssel Time. The 
senior made 7 of 10 free throws in 
the final quarter and had 13 
fourth period points. "Kyle 
stepped up in the second half, lie 
came over to me twice and 



changed the play 1 had called. He 
has a better feel fore it than I do," 
Mundclcin Coach Dennis Kcssel 
said. 

"I thought they really hurt us 
Inside. Parr is an unknown. They 
hurt us badly on the boards. It is a 
credit to Grayslakc. Their transi- 
tion game was better than ours. 
Wc did not get back on defense," 
Kcssel said. 

"I was not surprised. They 
have a real good team. I knew 
they would make a run at us. 1 
was not worried, but I knew wc 
had to step up. Every game our 
team does," Kyle Kcssel said. 

"We will have to play a lot bet- 
tor if wc arc going to win.' Coach 
Kcssel said. 







from page 32 

Rams 79-73 win over 
Dcerfield for the regional final? 
Stetch had a great game in 
rebounding, Groth said. The 5-1 1 
senior said positioning is the key 
in the land of the giants. 

The March 11 sectional final 
between Mundelcin and the 
Libertyvillc-Zion-Benton winner 
will be aired on WKRS Radio, 
beginning with the prc-game at 
7:15 p.m. 

How about that Ram fever? 

One could sec more Rams 
jackets come out of the closet af- 
ter the regional title, and the 
"Dunk Punks" were in full force 
this night with signs and painted 
faces. There was ncary an empty 
seat on the Grayslakc side. 

Here's hoping that trend con- 
tinues. 

Carmel High boys basketball 
coach Ben Berg sat towards the 
top of the bleachers in the crowd 
at the Grayslake-Mundclein 
game Tuesday. His assessment of 



crosstown team Mi IS? 

"That was the second time I 
have seen Mundclcin play. You 
have to deny Kyle Kcssel the ball 
If he has the ball 85 percent of the 
time, it plays into their hands," 
Berg said. 

Giving area hoops coaches a 
Sunday night off for a change 
from the usual rounds of tele- 
phone calls, yours truely had a 
chance to sec his alma mater play 
in the Mid-Cotninent Conference 
tourney. Not only did the Huskies. 
of NIU lose 87-77 to University of 
Illinois-Chicago, but the bill for 
one person can be expensive at 
the Rosemont Horizon. You pay 
$21 by the time you take your scat 
in Section 109. 



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Newspapers and claim your prize. (Winners will 
have two weeks after the contact date to pick up 
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SPORTS LaIccIancI Newspapers MARch 11, 1994 



Sponholtz wins 'trey' battle; Seniors go out in style 



STEVE PETERSON , 
Staff Reporter 

Geoff Sponholtz's season will 
continue March 1 1 as lie will be 
firing the three-pointer in the 
sectional final round: at 
Waukcgan East. 

'Hie senior would have much 
rather traded an outside touch for 
the B-for-15 threes he made to 
edge two sectional scmlfinalists 
who made 7. 

"1 did not have any rhythm 
left for the game," Sponholtz 
acknowledged. 

. The all Northwest Suburban 
Conference player finished with 
19 hard-earned points, mostly 
inside, in an 82-74 loss to 



Mundclein. 

Mundclcin reserve Matt 
Weitzel and Nccraj Lai of Lake 
Zurich both made 7 three-point- 
ers. Sponholtz decided the prc- 
gamc contest with 4-of-5 final 
rack. Matt Langc of Lake Zurich 
earned the final spot in the sec- 
tional final round with a 6 in 
overtime shootout with 
Waukcgan's Jayson Williams. 

Sponholtz has many fine 
memories of the 20-7 senior sea- 
son. They included desiring to 
wake up early for- workouts at 
5:30 and 6 a.m. each summer's 
morning. 

Among the biggest will be his 
team rallying from 12 and 15 



point deficits against the fifth 
best team In Illinois. 

"We ran down inside more. 
We got some good buckets out of 
that. We slowed the game down 
to a half-court gamc^to get them 
out of their run-and-gun," 
Sponholtz said. 

"We could have played better. 
Some of the first-half shots did 
not drop. In some stretches we 
looked good, in some stretches 
they looked good, but they 
looked good more," Sponholtz 
said. 

Sponholtz had some key bas- 
kets. Mis baseline jumper with :5 
left in the third quarter brought 
the Rams back from 51-36 to 



trailing 56-52. 

"We worked toward this the 
whole year. We wanted to win 
conference, and then gain 
respect for teams from the 
Northwest Suburban 

Conference," Sponholtz said. 

Sponholtz is weighing college 
choices between Lake Forest 
College and University of 
Wisconsln-Oshkosh. 

. Senior forwards Mike Higgins, 
John Miller, Jason Madolc', ' 
Christian Favrc, Todd Alfred (11 
points); forward Brian Stctch (4 
points) and Jason Horvath (4 
points) exited their high school 
careers with an all-out effort. 

"Mostly, we tried to push the 



starters hard/ 1 Madolc said. 

All to get to Friday. 

"We came here all summer at 
5:30 or 6 in the morning. We 
wanted to get to Friday - Just for 
this reason. We thought we were 
going to win the game," Coach 
Groth said, referring to the sec- 
tional final March 11 .between 
Mundclcin and Ubcrtyville-Zion 
winner. 

Groth, league MVP Mcndralla 
and the rest of the Rams have a 
message for those who voted 
them the No. 4 seed: 

"We'll be back," Groth said. 

Notebook: 

Looking for a hero in the 
' See BATTLE page C30 



hi 



SPORTS 




Newspapers 



u 



THIS WEEK 

Honors 

Carmers Dan Stasiek 
earns all-league acco- 
lade. 
PAGE C29 

Future goals 

CLC wrestlers plan for 
the future. 
PACEC29 

Bowling 
tbuntament 

The Lake County 
Bowling Association 
continues tournament 
play, 
PAGEG28 



Richmond honors 'elite' team 



L 



Athlete files 

suit against 
Warren 

The track and field set-up re- 
mains the same at the Warren 
Twp. High School fleldhousc. 

"We arc waiting advice from 
our legal counsel," Dr. Pat 
McMahon, superintendent, said. 

Curt Vogel, 17, is seeking 
$30,000 in damage from the 
school due to injuries the lawsuit 
states were caused in track prac- 
tice on March 18, 1993. 

Track and field coach Ron 
Taulu and trainer Mark Fos were 
named individually by the law- 
suit. 

Vogel returned to the track 
team, school officials said. 

Gurncc Fire Chief Tim 
McGrath said there is no record 
of a call to WTHS for a track relat- 
ed injury that day. 




STEVE PETERSON 



Allyson McNabb.Natalie Gambit and Heidi Raglnler walk off tho 
court following a closo loss to WMIfamsvUlo, 48-46 that ondod their 
quest tor a state title.— Photo by Bill Carey 

■ * 

Grayslake gains respect, 
but it's a Mundelein win 



STEVE PETERSON 



Staff Reporter 

; The two moments were sim- 
ply a great way to end an evening 
which was, at worst, an entertain- 
ing night of basketball at 
Waukegan East's gym. 

' Moment I: Kyle Kessel diving 
for a loose ball, winning the battle 
with a Grayslake player, tipping 
the ball to„Scan Stackhousc who 
put in a lay-up for the final points 
in an 82-74 Mundelein win. 

Moment II: Grayslake Coach 
Greg Groth called timeout with 
four seconds to go. Not to set up 
anil -point play, mind you. 

" 1 wanted to give the fans one 
more chance to applaud this 
team," Groth said in post-game 
quic*. 

By then, it was determined 
the Mustangs would battle 
Wednesday's Libcrtyvillc-Lake 
Forest winner for the sectional 
final March 11 at 7:30 p.m. at 
East. 

Indeed, the Hams set out to 



prove they belong. Even when 
Mundelein took away, the three- 
pointer and Kessel took away the 
game with a monster fourth quar- 
ter to finish with 33 points, the 
20-7 Rams did not quit 

"We played them exactly the 
way we wanted to," Groth said. 
"That is what happens when you 
play a good team like that. Our 
five guys adjusted well. 
Mundclein is just better than us." 

"We wanted to take the ball 
inside in the second half," Groth 
said. 

The Rams were down by 12 
and 15 points, but still forged a 
56-56 tie on a basket by John Parr 
(19 points) with 7:02 left 

Mcndralla picked up his 
fourth foul with 6:45 left and the 
momentum had swung back to 
the state's fifth-ranked team. 

Kyle Kessel hit two free throws 
for a 62-56 lead. 

Sean Stackousc (25 points) 
came up with the two key plays, 

Sec MUSTANGS page C30 



Staff Reporter 

The team was 40 minutes late, 
but that did not matter to those 
who have waited decades. 

Richmond-Burton girls bas- 
ketball boosters turned their 
necks to the door and read news- 
paper accounts of a magical sea- 
son as they waited for their hero- 
ines to return from Normal 
Saturday night 

"There is somewhat of an 
empty feeling because it is all 
over," Bob Gambit, father of 
team standout Natalie Gambit- 
said. 

"They all worked together," 
Linda Italian said. 

The mother of Julie Holian 
will always recall the trip to the 
Elite Eight. 

"We. decorated our cars and 
honked the horn on the way 
down. People would look at you," 
Mrs. Holian recalled. 

"It was a great one," John 
Toler, father of Leslie, said. 

Judy Toler said the team real- 
■ ized in summer ball its chances of 
playing with Gambit, who trans- 
. ferred from Carmel. 

"While playing at a Badger 
(Wis.) basketball camp, they 
knew there was a good. chance 
Natalie would join them," Judy 
Toler said. 

Nine months later, a 27-2 sea- 
son is complete, but the memo- 
ries are beginning. Gambit, a 48 
percent field goal shooter during 
the year, was honored by the 
Illinois Basketball Coaches Assn. 
by being named second team all- 
state. 

"I did not think it would hap- 
pen. I found out this afternoon," 
Gambit said. 

"This is the yardstick other 
McHenry County teams will be 
measured by," Coach Tom Lay 
said. 

"Natalie, is a well-rounded 
player who made everyone on the 
court better," Lay said. 

It could be two, three or even 
four years before what these 
Rockets accomplished will fully 
sit in. 

This. Rocket team had four 
players who could score 15 points 
or better: McNabb, who led the 
team with 34 three-pointers; 
Regnicr, who had 25ft rebounds; 



Bcnes, -who averaged nearly 10 
points a. game and of course, 
Gambit 

; Lay, who played guard during 
his days at RBCIIS, had a healthy 
attitude during the 29 -game run, 
25 wins in a row. Even when his 
career reached total eclipsed the 
100 mark, he did 'not take any 
credit l( 

"This is for the kids; not us," 
he would say. 

Richmond players hugged 
each other in emotional mo- 
ments late Saturday night 
Perhaps they were thinking 
about , 

A 52-33 win over Genoa- 
Kingston which won the Big Eight 
Conference title by, three games; 
holding on for a 48-41 regional 
final win over Marian Central; 
Gambit's three-pointer which 
beat Westmont 47-44 and sent 
the Rockets to Illinois State 
University's Redbird Arena for 
the first time. Or erasing an 11- 
point fourth- quarter deficit to 
Williamsville in the most exciting 
game of the four Class A quarter- 
finals. Or having four starters - 
Gambit, Heidi Rcgnier, Kathy 
Benes and Allyson McNabb being 
named all-conference. 

"It has been a dream season 
for the kids and me," Lay told 
parents and friends. 

And also for. a group of third- 
graders. Players stepped to the 
podium to read letters of con- 
gratulations. 

Notebook: the Rockets join 
some elite company in teams 
which this reporter has covered 
at the, state finals. It was only the 
third time since 1977-78 season 
since yours truly has had the 
pleasure of an Elite Eight as- 
signment The first was Crystal 
Lake in 1977-78 led* by Cheri 
Bacon; the second Wancn Twp. 
High in 1987-80 led by Crystal 
Cobb and now R-B in Class A led 
by Gambit. Unfortunately, the 
record in quarterfinals is 0- 
3.... The re was one Gurnce tie-in 
to the state finals Dcldre 
Anderson lived in Gurncc before 
her father Mike took the superin- 
tendent's position at Frccport. 
Anderson scored 14 points as 
Frccport edged Ccntralia 50-49 
and went on to win third place. 



X ft 
I t'